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Zapeth

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About Zapeth

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  1.   Well I want it to be cross-platform compatible (mainly support for Linux but if it opens the road to other platforms too then that would also be appreciated) and supported by nowadays hardware (support for older hardware would be good too but its not a requirement). Also I would like to avoid making any deeper code modifications and as I said I would imagine that 3.x+ requires deeper changes.       I believe I made it clear in my penultimate post that I decided not go down that road and that the idea is pretty much "silly" but whatever...
  2. Sorry for the double post but I figured this would still fit in here.   So after spending some time with OpenGL tutorials I'm wondering which OpenGL version I should aim for porting. I read here and there that 2.x should be sufficient for DirectX 6 games, is that true?   But even if it is, should really do it or rather aim for 3.x or maybe even 4.x? The main concern I have with this is that it could end up requiring some deeper source modifications (than with an older OpenGL version).
  3. I didn't mean to update to the highest available DirectX version anyway, I just wanted to know what "the best" would be (the highest I would try to go for is DirectX 9).   And I was unsure because it seems to be harder to find reference for DirectX 6 than newer versions. But I guess it would be easier to do it directly since I also heard that updating DirectX is no easy task either (especially for older versions).
  4. I was unsure whether to post this in the DirectX section or in the OpenGL one but since I ultimately want to port the game I have over to OpenGL (I'd like to make it cross-compatible) I figured its better to post here.   So I have a source code for an old game which uses DirectX 6. And I was wondering if its better (or easier) to upgrade it to a later DirectX version and then port it over to OpenGL or just do it directly.   Also I would like to know if there is some kind of reference (like what are similar functions or what is necessary to use instead) or some useful tipps for porting? Something like this would surely come in handy since I never did such a thing before ;)
  5. @samoth: thx for the link but unfortunately my mobile internet blocks the website so I cant read the text now. maybe you could explain me anyway how it works? Is it correct if I force the game to wait until the required time has passed? And what should I do with a PC that cant keep up with the speed I want to have? @Adaline: thx for your timer code Adaline, I already had a QueryPerformance Timer working but it wasnt as compact as yours As for the question if it is good to use this timer I dont really care as long as it works with the game. And how much Milliseconds would 60fps be? edit: ok I did some more research and found this nice site where different methods of using a timer are shown and explained with their pros and cons for both fast and slow computers - http://www.koonsolo.com/news/dewitters-gameloop/ so now I have implemented the first method there with the timeGetTime() function and I watched the fps (that I display with the QueryPerformance Timer) and recognized that they are not exactly around 60.0fps. Its more around 57 - 64 fps, I assume this is because the timeGetTime() function is not as precise as the QueryPerformanceCounter? another strange thing is that he is not always at ~60fps, sometimes there are suddenly huge fps drop for a short time and sometimes he goes over the 60fps limit I set for some seconds. also the whole game doesnt run very fluid but that might be because of the just mentioned fps irregularities
  6. Hello, I am currently working on a Pacman remake (purely 2D, my first game btw so its more a try to learn some program skills than to create something fun). So now I am having the problem that the game runs with different speed on different computers and since I have read that there are different timers out there I would like to know what are the best ones (I am programming under Windows but I would like to have the opportunity to easily port the game to Linux or even portable devices). But I also need help with the principle of a timer. I know it measures (or returns) the time that has passed since the last call (or do only certain timers do that?) but what do I have to do with that information now? For my game I would like to have a constant game speed of 60fps so I think I know what I have to do with a PC that is too fast - after he is done with the update, drawing etc functions of the game, he has to wait a certain time (what would that be if I want 60fps?) until he repeats them so I simply put him on wait until that time has passed. But what do I have to do with a PC that is not so fast? For example a really slow PC that makes only 10 fps (or more drastically 0.1fps), what is that PC supposed to do to keep up with the game speed? Thanks in advance
  7. Hello, I am currently working on a Pacman remake (purely 2D, my first game btw so its more a try to learn some program skills than to create something fun). So now I am having the problem that the game runs with different speed on different computers and since I have read that there are different timers out there I would like to know what are the best ones (I am programming under Windows but I would like to have the opportunity to easily port the game to Linux or even portable devices). But I also need help with the principle of a timer. I know it measures (or returns) the time that has passed since the last call (or do only certain timers do that?) but what do I have to do with that information now? For my game I would like to have a constant game speed of 60fps so I think I know what I have to do with a PC that is too fast - after he is done with the update, drawing etc functions of the game, he has to wait a certain time (what would that be if I want 60fps?) until he repeats them so I simply put him on wait until that time has passed. But what do I have to do with a PC that is not so fast? For example a really slow PC that makes only 10 fps (or more drastically 0.1fps), what is that PC supposed to do to keep up with the game speed? Thanks in advance edit: oh sry somehow he did post this topic twice, please delete one of them
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