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alh420

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About alh420

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  1. alh420

    Do we really want science in games?

    Another note on appearance of science. Kerbal Space Program is a good example of that. It's very sciency-focused, but all the physics are very simplified (yet still detailed) and distances and forces gameified for it to become a fun game. Don't fall in the trap that it has to be scientifically _accurate_ to appeal to the crowd that wants science in their games. I don't agree with the assumption that No Man Sky mainly failed because of too little science, I think it failed because of too little game, and an experience that quickly became repetitive and uninteresting. Maybe more science would have helped to create a game, but if it didn't address the interactivity of the game, I don't think it would help.
  2.   That is a bit naive view of standards... As an example, our games run on the industry standard called "OpenGL".  Still means a lot of tweaking and testing for different platforms, and keeping track of lots of tiny differences and minor and major bugs between driver manufacturers, hardware, and OS, multiplied with the different versions of it found in the wild...   A user of your middleware would expect you to guarantee it will work on different implementations of HTML5, but you will likely always have tiny problems on some of them. Those tiny problems is what the user of the engine will have to work around to ship a product, and they can't wait for you  to fix them. It is also the reason they DONT want updates at any time, only at very controlled times, and for very controlled reasons. 
  3. alh420

    Writing Efficient Endian-Independent Code in C++

    Wouldn't this mean throwing away quite a lot of performance on all platforms that are not little-endian? Writing byte-by-byte instead of word by word can be quite a big performance loss. I'm not sure with current ARM processor, but at least in older ones it takes the exact same time to read/write a byte, as it takes to read/write a full word, so writing byte-by-byte would mean a performance loss of x4!   Making sure all your memory-accesses are aligned before pulling/pushing stuff from/to file or network doesn't really seem like that big a deal that it is worth throwing away that much performance for it.. Most of the time, the compiler handles it for you
  4. alh420

    Reducing Unity game file size

    If you use OSX, a tip for reducing the file size even further is to use ImageOptim. It's a free tool for lossless compression of png-files, which work very well! We use it for all our .png files, and it reduces the size a lot, without any visual degradation.   I've had files (with lots of transparency) drop to a quarter of the size.
  5. Very interesting! Thank you for rekindling my interest in Escher tilings!
  6. alh420

    Games Are a Whole New Form of Storytelling

    I fully agree that the most memorable moments in games have been story created by myself, in my own imagination, arising from the mechanics of the game. Everything from the goals I set for myself in minecraft, to the quick and fatal stories that evolve while playing rougelikes, to the epic stories that evolve while playing strategy games like civ and total war.   I quickly get very bored with those games that takes you through a pre-set story where I as a player is just forced to "act out" the action scenes.
  7. "Be nice to future you" isn't that wrong... The guy who will read your code the most is most likely yourself, and you _will_not_ remember how you reasoned at the time you wrote it. Doesn't matter how self evident you think it is at the time. If your code isn't clear, as outlined in the article, you will spend too much time trying to figure out what the *** you where thinking, and lower your productivity a lot.
  8. I believe he would have to compile two executables if it was decided while compiling.     Wouldn't you have to do that anyway, to support the new system? The binary has to be compiled to match the system endianness, so you should know then if you need to swap or not.
  9. Nice article!   Though he function pointers may be convenient, but wouldn't it be better if the choice is in compile time instead of runtime?   No system should change its endianess, and it should be known at compile time right? I'm not sure how to check for it though...
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