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flangazor

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  1. Obviously, the more specific your code is, the less reusable it will be. One thing to keep in mind is that in order to reuse your components, you need to have a protocol that is easy to reuse. For example, you might think about it in terms of genericity: having a very general interface requiring too many resources to be passed to it is irritating because you end up with your resource boiler plate code all over the place. Having an interface try to take care of this stuff ends up being less reusable because it's assuming too much. To get around this requires some clever design. In my experience, it usually involves inversion of control (i.e. Strategies and Commands (or Visitors)), which I think equates to Combinators in functional languages. Inversion of control ends up giving you a combinatorial algebra which is reusable based on how you compose your code. The downside is that Java isn't very good at inversion of control (it takes a lot of faffing about/overhead code). Python and Smalltalk will do inversion of control very easily in OOP, but they tend to be slowed down by compilers not being clever enough to optimise the passed in functions with the code they are acting upon. C++'s STL is a great example of a combinatorial library that is reusable without giving you a runtime overhead (a design sweet spot). hplus is right to point you in that direction!
  2. I still don't see a reason to replace my Dreamcast.
  3. Quote:Original post by LessBread Typical causes for stack corruption are infinite recursions and large local variables, for example, screen buffers declared as local variables. The default stack size on Windows is 1 mb. I don't see any of that in the sample code. memcpy overflow onto a stack address can do a nice job of it as well. Quote: void GUIGroup::addTo(CEGUI::Window*& dest) Make that just a pointer. *& is for when you want to move the pointer as a side effect. You don't need it here since you aren't affecting the pointer itself; merely the memory it points to. Quote:This class is giving me some headache...after I create an instance of it, and then tried to quit the application, I always get the exception "Stack is corrputed" at the ending brace of the main() function. I'm using VS C++ .NET 2005.Nitage is right that you don't initialise GroupWindow_ to anything. If this code is accurate, then your destructor is deleting whatever the hell memory it likes. When is the destructor called? I am going to guess that you have allocated the CSampleMenu on the stack (not used 'new'), so it's cleaned up when your function ends. That's why the debugger is pointing to the end brace.
  4. I'm not sure what you mean by menu system here, but if you mean a data driven menu interface, please reconsider. If you have so many options to choose from that you can't be bothered to go through them all and code a proper interface for them, a user isn't going to like going through a menu! It's simply too many items! Consider a combo box that looks for the option the user types -like a URL bar in most browsers; or intellisense/omnicomplete in many editors. This way, it can be data driven AND nice to use. If you're not doing a data driven menu system, I'll shut up now.
  5. programming.reddit.com. Various mailing list archives; e.g. PLT Scheme Archives or Python list*. groups.google.com. * The incorrect dates on the Python list are from people who have their mail clients stamping mails incorrectly. I think the mailman should stamp the posts...
  6. This thread will be of interest.
  7. Dan the Automator is pretty good.
  8. Perhaps a thread isn't terminating it's own loop when the main thread of control ends. This will leave the other thread to spin away waiting for an exit condition.
  9. I'm interested. If it's not for actual money, it would be good for learning how to be a quant. If it is for actual money, you may as well get a job as a quant. Alternatively, you could see about setting up some server to a commodity market or access to FX trading. Then you could let people trade on your platform. Currently, more solutions are very expensive so only investment banks and hedge funds dare let bots on them.
  10. sanguineraven, you don't need the BBC to tell you about the poor officiating. Ronaldo appeals to ref about Rooney challenge -> Rooney sent off. England win a kick from 30 yards out at the 81st minute (Lennon brought down) and Portuguese swarm the ref. No bookings. Petit maimed Joe Cole in the 42nd minute and gets a booking when he should have been sent off (IIRC, two feet, studs up, from behind -please correct me if I'm wrong) Maniche blatantly dives in the 57th minute and the ref talks to him - no booking for outright faking. Hargreaves appeals to ref about Lennon being fairly tackled in the box in the 107th minute -> Hargreaves booked... *boggle* According to this, Rooney was sent off for the alleged stamp, despite the ref making no such gesture until Rooney pushed Ronaldo. Riidiculous.
  11. One thing that might help you narrow it down is to pop the hood and look for bloated or exploded capacitors. I once had a similar problem to what you describe and it turned out to be some blown capacitors.
  12. Quote:Original post by deffer Does anybody know what exactly happened right after Argentina-Germany penalties? There was some kind of a fight between Argentina players and Olivier Bierhoff et.al., as far as I was told, but my local sources don't know anything more, so I'm still in the dark.No one has said what the Germans did to set the Argentinians off. Some speculate someone said something to Heinze, who has a German surname. Others say it might have to do with the ridiculous card on Rodriguez when he should have been given a penalty - and Ballack not getting booked despite diving in the box. Same supposed foul - uneven consequences. At this point, I don't think any referee in this tournament will let Germany lose.
  13. I thought Brasil had Ronaldihno playing right behind Ronaldo and Adriano, effectively making it three up front.
  14. Quote:[EDIT] Having reviewed my post, I would just like to define "fair" as "playing by the same rules as everyone else". Leaving football threads alone now and staying out of the lounge for a bit.Why would you post if you're not interested in entering a discussion? First, big Phil will never manage England since he's killed his career by bandying around racist terms. EDIT: that's actually Big Ron. Who the heck calls Phil Scolari Big Phil?? IMO, England needs to sort itself out with a 433. Relying on a single striker is simply ridiculous. 442 only works when you have top players up front like Rooney and Owen, Henry and Trezuget, Podolsi and Klose, Crespo and Tevez. The difference here is that France, Germany, and Argentina have a huge amount of depth of strikers. England brought four strikers for the whole tournament (one of which was a complete joke). The others brought at least six each. For years, England has played with not enough players getting up front and relying on solid defending and scoring either from the break or from free kicks. Bringing only four strikers is ridiculous, especially when two of them were recovering from injuries on the days leading up to the cup. However, even in this limited situation, Cole and Lennon could probably play in the role along with Rooney or Crouch (who played suprisingly well today). 433 is how Brasil and Spain play and they've never been short of scoring opportunities and still do well in the midfield. It's also how I played growing up so I'm biased to it. :-P Also, check this out: World-FIFA officials at loss to explain Rooney red card. [Edited by - flangazor on July 2, 2006 9:04:36 AM]
  15. Quote:Original post by Demosthenes Today one of England's players kicked an opponent in the nuts and then procedeed to twist his leg around.If he actually stepped on his nuts and twisted his leg the guy on the ground wouldn't have immediately gotten up and continued play. He wrapped his legs around Rooney, as MDI said, and then decided to fake an injury it [again]. Personally, I think England have been poor all tournament and they aren't the best team in the world by a long shot. So no one should expect them to win the cup except through luck. That said, it ruins the game when some PoS goes to ground begging for the magic sponge because he went into a tackle with a player he knew was more physical. If he is injured it's because he's going into tackles he shouldn't since should know he's suck a softie: he's an idiot. If he isn't injured he should be booked for simulating an injury: he's a wanker. It's this kind of pansy behaviour that wins Rugby more and more fans.