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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

CoffeeCoder

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  1. Why are you so confused? Windows 10 isn't designed to run on just 2GB of RAM, hell even Windows 7 can barely run on that! Upgrade your RAM, that will help. RAm is fairly inexpensive and you'll probably gain a considerable increase in performance just by adding two more gigs.  Downgrade to an earlier version of Windows, that will help.  And as always, make sure your drivers are up to date. The GTX 750 also isn't the greatest card in the world and is probably also a contributor. Yes, you're running older games on it and it should be just fine, but because you're running Windows 10 on just two gigs of RAM it will slow everything down.  So, to sum up.  Buy RAM (inexpensive and available from Newegg, Tiger Direct, or even Best Buy) Downgrade WIndows 10 to Windows 7 Check drivers  
  2. Thanks for the input! Yeah, I too think the ones on the right look far far better.  I did a bit of a redesign, attempting some hills/slopes. Still needs work, plus I want to work out tiles with different slope angles. One step at a time! :D [URL=http://s226.photobucket.com/user/Yodamanjer/media/Screenshot%20from%202015-08-14%20134347.png.html][/URL]
  3. Hey guys,  I'm creating a basic tileset for a quick little game, and I'm having trouble deciding what looks best! I want to use gradients to give the game a nice unique and sleek look, but I also like the idea of making it look a little retro.  Below is a screenshot, the tiles on the right are the original, and the ones on the left I ran through a posterize filter to achieve that "lower bit" look (somewhere around the 32-bit era). What do you think? [URL=http://s226.photobucket.com/user/Yodamanjer/media/Posterized%20or%20Not.png.html][/URL] I am aware of a couple flaws in the sprite design itself, in fact I'll probably redo most of it, but before I do I want to settle on a style! Any suggestions?
  4. Ah, a double-edged sword this is! From the moderators' perspective, a temporary ban on certain topics seems a very good thing to do, until the heat of the fire cools down a bit.  I come from various other forums (particularly the forums of The Game Creators), where they have banned tons of topics with no ifs, ands or buts about it. They're just banned. Talking about them in any sense? Thread locked, key thrown away, moderators message you and say "Sorry, disallowed topic!".  So, at least GD.net has the good sense of letting us talk about the ban itself, and it really does seem to be only temporary; to give the staff a well-deserved break, and to let the community cool down a bit too.  I never participated in these subjects anyway so it's no difference to me. That being said... From the community's perspective, a sudden ban of topics is a little disconcerting. Bit I think jbadams is handling it very well, and it doesn't look to me like he's trying to start a dictatorship of any kind (not yet, anyway! :P ), so again I think a temporary ban makes sense. Gives everyone a break, and now you don't have to worry about a new thread about GamerGate popping up. :P  
  5. I upgraded to Windows 10, which promptly led me to install Linux Mint on my secondary hard drive. :P  
  6. I'm currently using (and enjoying!) App Game Kit. It lets you program in either BASIC or C++, it's entirely up to you. It's a very powerful tool. This game was made using it as well as lots of others, I highly recommend it. :)  
  7. It has been a long time since I've posted anything in this journal, in fact I sort of forgot about its existence! Won't do that again. :) I'm not sure how many people are familiar with it, but I'm using App Game Kit from The Game Creators, the same company behind DarkBASIC, to create the base engine for a really simplistic game. I won't get into too much detail about the game now, but suffice to say it should be a fun one to program! One of the features of the game is going to be a built-in level editor which will allow the player to create their own unique levels. It will be fairly easy to implement, as the editor is basically going to be its own program in a separate included file, which will store map data in an array that the main engine will be able to use. I love building level editors, but there are a few things I realized player's would want in one. A GUI System (while I'm comfortable using keys and text, players will want buttons) Undo/Redo Funcionality Both of those things I plan to work on and get operational before I start work on anything else. I'm actually working on the Undo/Redo API first as I thought that would be the most difficult. Turns out it is actually really easy! First, I'm creating a custom type to store metadata in, then declaring two global arrays based on the type. Whenever an action is performed, I call a function which will record the action into the undo stack. Whenever someone undoes the last action, it will copy the information from the current element of the undo stack into a new element of the redo stack (say all of this ten times fast, I dare you! :P ). In order to keep memory usage down, there will be a limit of 50 undo/redoes available. But the really good thing about this system will be just how customizable it is, if the user wants to record other types of data, all they have to do is add the necessary information to the custom metadata type. I know there are much better ways to handle something of this nature, but this was the best solution I could come up with and I'm sticking to it! Anybody here use AGK that might be interested in it? :)
  8. I also use gmail, Outlook is just too weird, although that account is my social/online email and the gmail is the one I use for friends and family. I had no idea 190 billion emails were sent in a day, that's insane.
  9. Yeah, no kidding. I thought it was supposed to be easy, and instead it just made me tear my hair out repeatedly. If anybody is looking for a good 2D engine, App Game Kit from The Game Creators is pretty good, provided you don't mind programming things from scratch. :) I've been using it for a few days now and it's brilliant. I can program things in there faster and more easily than I ever could with GameMaker! Another good thing to look into is Stencyl. I tried it for a few days and it was pretty nice!
  10. Ryuzaki, This is what infuriated me most about GameMaker. The same code may work for one person but doesn't work for another. I can see you were following Shaun Spalding's platformer tutorials, which generally the code from that should work. I'm not sure why it's not working for you, it might just be the version of GameMaker? I was running 1.4 until I couldn't stand it anymore and stopped using GameMaker altogether. :P The while loop should work, even though it seems like it shouldn't. Another reason GameMaker drove me nuts, it encourages bad coding habits! Anyway, I hope you got it sorted out!
  11. I usually email with my computer. I ahve two accounts, one for forums/other social sites and one that's private for friends and suchlike. Helps keep everything separated and nothing gets too terribly cluttered!
  12.    Wow.  That's some bad code.   My brain definitely just hurt itself trying to read through all of that. it's completely indecipherable, like the lost language of an unknown civilization. Comments really would have helped, but that...thing...is still very poorly designed!
  13. Apple are pretty much rendering it obsolete by replacing it with Swift, which honestly looks a lot better than Obj-C. Easier to learn as well, I imagine! I think Obj-C is still supported right now, but in a few years that may not be the case anymore. I guess you could say they're giving it a swift death *ba dum tss*
  14. That would be an amazing thing, but I'm not sure how well it would work. Light scatters and diffuses a lot over distances, so anything you would find would be fuzzy and blurry at best. However, this is a GREAT idea for something in a game! Imagine that the point of the game is to determine the location of some secret item and the only way to find it is by watching the past unfold. Could definitely be a great element! These types of ideas frequently keep me up at night :)
  15. I would actually at this point recommend a Surface Pro, if you can afford it. While I haven't personally used one, I have several friends that have one and have used it for everything, including programming. It's a beautiful display as well. If it wasn't that expensive I would get one. :P