• Advertisement

RIESTUDIOS_176735

Member
  • Content count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by RIESTUDIOS_176735

  1. Dev team playtesting

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  2. [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

    Follow along as we revive 4-player co-op!
  3. player 4 Costume

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  4. player 3 Costume

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  5. player 2 Costume

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  6. Player 1 Costume

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  7. First stage - Spring Showers

    From the album [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

  8. 3D game dev. What do I need?

    [quote name='Shrikky' timestamp='1320920542' post='4882507'] [quote name='menyo' timestamp='1320538278' post='4880909'] Where to start is up to you, i started (and still stuck in ) C# XNA, some started in Python (you know they created Eve online with that), some in c++ (those companies you named use this most, but it's a hard and harsh language), some in java(some swear by it some stay far away from it), some use SDL or UDK other dig into DirectX and OpenGL. Well you get it, the list is endless. I like the pad i choose up to now, i have seen some amazing results. So download the programs i gave the links for and do that tutorial. You will have a moving sprite in a hour or maybe 2. Learning a single language will let you step into other with ease. You will understand basic programming principles like loops, polymorphism, etc. The syntax and the way error handling and debugging is different, thats why i think starting out in a language like c# is the best thing to do. I asked this question too, did some C++, some Java and then decided to pick C# with the XNA api. [/quote] So we can use C# and XNA for creating a 2D game n then slowly hop into 3D? [/quote] Yep. I wouldn't recommend XNA for 3D games though. If you want to keep things simple then make the 3D games use Unity.
  9. Game Designer and CEO at RIE STUDIOS LTD.
  10. Programming and best route to go

    [quote name='Jesse7' timestamp='1320401712' post='4880422'] [quote name='DarkRayne' timestamp='1320235169' post='4879630'] Hi, I am an equivalent of a junior in Devry's Game and Simulation programming degree. My knowledge in C++ is average and need to take more time to learn more. My question to all is, I reached a point in my classes where I am getting into Unreal UDK. I am really enjoying it, it looks so good. I have a few game ideas that I'd like to explore and possibly put out on an app store when I eventually get more of a grasp on it. Should I be gearing myself more to towards learning to use an engine or start from scratch like C# XNA Framework. Simple games seem to get the most attention. I just see learning C# as something that will be more beneficial because you can release something for mobile devices and make a little money at the same time. I dont see the Apple store to be very good unless you have hell of marketing and there is way too many apps to even get noticed. Just an opinion, Any suggestions/ advice from people who have been there done that ? All is appreciated [/quote] I couldn't help but notice the title of your post. The truth is there isn't really a "best route to go." If you enjoy what you are doing (e.g. programming), why would you want someone else to tell you what you "should" be doing? If you enjoy working with UDK, then continue with it. I really don't understand when someone says "I really enjoy doing this" but then they go around asking others to confirm their choices or to suggest a different choice. If you need others to confirm what you are doing then perhaps you really don't enjoy that activity and should spend more time thinking about what it is you want. I get the impression that you want to use your work as a means to make money or gain fame. There's nothing wrong with those, but there are easier ways to get them than with programming. Programming should be an end in itself--something you'd do even if no one paid you a single dime to do it or if no one ever praised your work. It sounds harsh, but that's the attitude of those who succeed in this business. [/quote] Well said. I think people often are misled to think that Game Designer = Game Programmer. This is untrue, if you're more creative (like me) and you're not all that into coding as it's own art-form; then use an engine where the code is as minimal as possible. UDK has Kismet so you're not writing anything if you don't need to and Unity has a bunch of pre-made code. That means you can focus on graphics, music, story, cinema etc... Go where your talent is and be true to yourself ;)
  11. 3D game dev. What do I need?

    [quote name='menyo' timestamp='1320538278' post='4880909'] Where to start is up to you, i started (and still stuck in ) C# XNA, some started in Python (you know they created Eve online with that), some in c++ (those companies you named use this most, but it's a hard and harsh language), some in java(some swear by it some stay far away from it), some use SDL or UDK other dig into DirectX and OpenGL. Well you get it, the list is endless. I like the pad i choose up to now, i have seen some amazing results. So download the programs i gave the links for and do that tutorial. You will have a moving sprite in a hour or maybe 2. Learning a single language will let you step into other with ease. You will understand basic programming principles like loops, polymorphism, etc. The syntax and the way error handling and debugging is different, thats why i think starting out in a language like c# is the best thing to do. I asked this question too, did some C++, some Java and then decided to pick C# with the XNA api. [/quote] menyo XNA is awesome *hi 5*
  12. 3D game dev. What do I need?

    Lol gh05t you're starting with C++ ! You're either as ambitious as the NASA Moon scientists or entering into a mental warzone! C++ is incredibly hard to master for someone new to programming. The mark of good game code is finesse. The language is nearly irrelevant. Everything just has to work intuitively and efficiently. There is a perception that C++ automatically means the code is better. Wrong! It's actually easier to write better code with the enhanced OOP features other languages have. Within the industry although most people respect C++, there are thousands of companies using other languages simply because writing GOOD code in C++ can be such a headache. You are right though, the main strength of C++ is it's low-level architecture which allows it to be blazingly fast. However, that doesn't mean every other language is going to run games at a snails pace. A well coded game in C# probably has all the speed at runtime you'd ever need without ever sniffing C++. You're a creative person, don't forget that. There's no shame there, back in the day my coding was rusty, so I had to use the easiest language possible; I ended up using Flash for my 2D games and DarkBasic Pro for my 3D games. Yeah you won't get much respect from programmers, but creatively, games players loved my work! The reason? I was able to spend less time fussing with code, and more designing, telling a great story and making beautiful game graphics. I really like your passion gh05t, you're very driven. That's awesome. What you DON'T want to do is be in over your head. You're in it for the gamers. Gamers don't really care what code you use, just make it look good and play well. Take it from me it took a long time for me to realise that. All the best! Keep me up to date with your games, I'd like to follow you on Twitter if you have one.
  13. Are you an #indie #artist, #comicker or #gamedesign person? share your talents with our a brand new hub for indies! #comingsoon RT
  14. 3D game dev. What do I need?

    Hi gh05t, First off welcome to 3D game development I think what you're after is a game engine. A game engine nowadays is a powerful program where your super-awesome 3D models and code and other assets come together. Modern game engines have real-time 3D views of your game world. This is where you can construct your levels, play-test your game but also set up your cameras, lighting, AI, particle FX emitters, and all that fun stuff. Code/Models/Audio = assets (stuff ready to be put into your game engine) Engine = where the magic happens (the game editor) [b]Great FREE 3D game engines:[/b] [list][*]Unity (this engine is *awesome face*, brilliant community support and makes stuff for Mac, PC, browsers and mobiles)[*]UDK (with love, this engine is outstanding)[*]CryEngine3 ('nuff sed)[*]ShiVa3D (haven't managed to make a game in it but it seems similar to Unity)[/list] Hope that helps you. If you get stuck there's always 2D! Trololololol.... All the best with your games!
  15. [WIP] Komodo Crunchtime

    Follow us as we revive 4 player co-op
  • Advertisement