• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

adwodon

Members
  • Content count

    2
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

100 Neutral

About adwodon

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Ah I knew I'd made a forum rookie error in that section, thanks for moving, and thanks again for taking the time to dissect my mid-crisis ramblings. I've started looking at the FAQ's and will take your advice, working on a portfolio whilst looking into more entry level jobs, I'm still young so I can chase those dream jobs once I've got a solid footing. I especially like the '10 Stupid Things Wannabes Do To Mess Up Their Career Aspirations' on your website, very enlightening.
  2. Hello everyone, An introduction is required I suppose, I'm James, I'm 25, I currently live in London and I'm doing my 4th year of an MSci Physics at UCL. My future career has always been something I've thought about but I've found it difficult to pin down, I initially wanted to be a musician and was for a few years, why I'm so late at university, however several things put me on the path to doing a physics degree with the idea of working in some kind of applied field. Then I started to learn programming and fell in love with it, odd I know, the challenge was interesting but not frustrating, unlike a fair amount of physics, and after focusing as much of my degree towards it as I could I decided I would like to do something with this as a career, being an avid gamer myself the idea of the games industry pop'd up and whilst I dismissed it at first as an unlikely dream I've been thinking about it more and more so now, today, I am here to ask some questions for the collective wisdom of the GameDev.net community. I have experience in programming languages like Java and C++ but I will not say I'm experienced, I'm an undergrad for one, I've been a gamer for as long as I can remember, I used to make maps for CS and Unreal Tournament years ago but nothing noteworthy so aside from that I have almost no direct experience related to gaming. Most of my programming experience is related to data analysis and simulations, my MSci project is titled 'Modelling the highest energy collisions in the world' and involves me taking papers (currently: [url="http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/1003.2923"]http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/1003.2923[/url]) and implementing them in the Rivet software package (C++, [url="http://projects.hepforge.org/rivet/"]http://projects.hepforge.org/rivet/[/url]) and then using a Monte Carlo event generator (SHERPA: [url="http://projects.hepforge.org/sherpa/trac/wiki"]http://projects.hepf...herpa/trac/wiki[/url]) to verify that the generator agrees with real world data. I also did a 3rd year CS course this year in computer graphics ([url="http://www-typo3.cs.ucl.ac.uk/students/syllabus/undergrad/3080_computer_graphics/"]http://www-typo3.cs....puter_graphics/[/url]) I hear a lot that the UK is a great country for innovation in gaming, we have a lot of smart and creative people, but a recurring theme I hear a lot is a lack of 'skilled' developers in the UK industry. I have briefly looked at jobs available in the UK but it seems almost all require 3+ years of direct industry experience and I've found this very disheartening. I can understand why companies want people with experience, however looking at a lot of my graduate friends, they have jobs with amazing companies who are teaching them the industry and bringing out their full potential. It also appears to me if there's a lack of talent in the industry, why isn't more being done to encourage graduates? I think this is more of a general UK trend of ignoring computer science in school and industry though, there probably isn't the incentives required from the government for companies to take risks on graduates. I would love to work for the games industry, and I want to do what I can to get a place in a good company but I'm starting to feel like my lack of participation in extra curricular projects has killed any chance. I am looking for a team for the Dare to be Digital ([url="http://www.daretobedigital.com/"]http://www.daretobedigital.com/[/url]) over the summer which I hope will give me a taste of actually working on a fully functioning game, albeit in only 9 weeks, but that still seems like nothing compared to the experience required. I also hear a lot about developers getting stuck just making rather uninteresting flash games for their career, I want to work in the really technical side, physics engines, graphics engines or whatever I find the most interesting. To give an example, I grew up in Nottingham, my dads house is about a 10-15 minute walk from Cryteks UK studios, I spoke to a friend about possibly applying there as I could live at home for a bit to save money and they seemed keen on hiring programmers with 'any' level of experience and they have an absolutely amazing graphics engine, which I don't think they work on in Nottingham... but he said not to bother as they only hire people who have done projects with their engine. There are plenty of good programming / analyst (yawn) jobs out there for people like me, even teaching is a guaranteed job with good pay and job satisfaction and in the current climate getting something that pays the bills is my no.1 priority, think we would all rather do something that accomplishes that whilst also being something we're really passionate about though, and this industry is that to me, as I'm sure it is to everyone else here. Ultimately I want to know, am I just one in many thousands who are after these jobs, but not at the top of the pile? Am I listening too much to nay saying? Does anyone have any solid advice, preferably specific to the UK industry? I can only imagine there are a tonne of threads similar to this here, but none of them really had any answers I hadn't seen before, most people seem keen on the more design and less technical elements of development or have no higher education qualification, I suppose I should ask whether or not that even matters (physics degree)? Apologies for it being a long read, but I am hoping with more detail, you can get an idea of my thought processes and concerns and I will get less general responses, which is what I'm, perhaps naively, hoping for. TL;DR Physics graduate with a small amount of programming experience wondering whether the UK gaming industry would have any interest, and some ramblings about graduate jobs.