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Commodore256

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  1. This question came to me looking at smartphone games and I noticed how most of them is $1-$6, none of them are $60. (ports of former $60 games that now cost $5 like GTA3 don't count because they already made returns on the original investment, so everything is profit) I've notice how the cheap games are the most fun you can have for $1, but the production values is nowhere near that of say Skyrim or Mass Effect. This got me thinking... What if there was a game with production values so high, in order to make a profit, they would have to sell a million copies at $1,000? (Or whatever ridiculously high number you want) We have had games with higher production values than the standard, but still sold for the standard price of Video Games, like Shinmue, LA Noire, Earthbound had a freakin' Strategy Guide and so does World of Warcrack, but they're subscription based, so the Guide is just Icing on the Cake. But, we have had a $200 Game once before, [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_Battalion"]Steel Battalion[/url], but it was only expensive because of the controller. In the 90's, we had these Battletech Pods (google it) that were Arcade Machines with full immersion, but the closest thing to we have of that now is a room with 6 Nvidia 3D Vision Projectors and a [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVKGr_J1gF0"]Warplizer[/url]. I think the most expensive game should have new technology. (or maybe old technology that's not used in consumer land) For Starters, no Polygons! It would have Voxels! (Basically, 3D Pixels! imagine [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsO23lNp_Hs"]this[/url], but enough Voxels to make a Character Model mold like Clay) Second, no Voice-Overs, realistic Human Voice Synthesis that sound a lot better than Hatsune Miku. (Actually, Miku is a real Human Voice, just autotuned with software) Third, Actual AI, I don't want to just interact with the Characters, I want the Characters to interact with Me. Fourth, I would like there to be interiors to every building with items that you would find in a house and have all of them look different. Of course, there would be good hardware needed and I would want it to be good, but what do you guys think? What would you like to see in Video Games, but they're not feasible to implement in a $60 game that sells a million copies and with a $300 Console? (or even a $800 PC, we would need custom RISC Processors with custom extensions and Co-Processors)
  2. [quote name='Bregma' timestamp='1332082638' post='4923042'] It's interesting that google came up with several step-by-step examples on the first page when I entered "mingw linux" in the search box. There appears to be many pages of results. [/quote] Yeah, but It's weird I use Mingw in Linux but there's too many hoops to jump through to try to get it to work. I spent an a whole day trying to figure it out what's going wring, but it works with windows. I guess it's not worth pursuing because it's wasting production time to try to get a distraction-free environment that linux offers. (because there's no steam on my old laptop)
  3. Right, that would be like going from Wintel Linux to Sparc Solaris. Anyway, I tried the i586-mingw32msvc-g++ and I keep on getting linker errors I'm looking for an in depth guide on using it with libraries and I don't get those linker errors when I try to cross compile, but I don't get them when I do it nativity.
  4. Update: I've found a good solution for compiling, but bad for debugging if you're using mac only Libs. [url="http://www.sandroid.org/imcross/#What_is_IMCROSS"]http://www.sandroid.org/imcross/#What_is_IMCROSS[/url]
  5. I've tried different methods, but I have no clue what I'm doing. The reason why I don't just use windows is because I'm easily distracted by Steam and my 4870 on my Desktop and I dev from a crappy Laptop.because all I can do there is use gcc and a text editor. (That's why I did more rom hacking on windows xp with 256MB of ram than my quad core, lol) Anyway, I would like to know how do the Canadian Cross with external Libraries, I can't seem to figure it out. Yes, I've "googled it" and found nothing useful.
  6. Yeah, I know what you mean. I used to be an OSX /PowerPC fan, (But I kept the avatar) but apple's going away from the geeks and going for consumers. Another thing about the "Mountain Lion King", It will have a thing like UAC Called the "Gatekeeper" and you can't install unsigned apps with it unless you click a button to allow it. Where's the Keymaster when you need him?
  7. I like PowerPC, but I heard Mountain Lion won't even support older Intel Macs. (except the Mac Pro, it supports the 2008 Mac Pro) List of supported Macs: [code]iMac (mid 2007 or later) MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, 2008), (13-inch, Early 2009 or later) MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid-2009 or later), (15-inch, 2.4/2.2 GHz), (17-inch, Late 2007 or later) MacBook Air (Late 2008 or later) Mac Mini (Early 2009 or later) Mac Pro (Early 2008 or later) Xserve (Early 2009)[/code] I think it's due to 32-bit EFI and crappy Video Cards in previous Macs. But yeah, just get a used 09' Mac Mini if you just can't borrow it from the Computer Lab.
  8. I've been looking around for iWorld (Mac/iOS) development from a minimalistic approach and I found [url="http://www.macincloud.com/"]http://www.macincloud.com/[/url] Basically, you rent a mac in the cloud starting at $20 a month for 3 hours a day and going up to $50 a month for unlimited and there educational discounts, But what's the point? If you do a little math, it would add up to a cost of a used mac mini in a year and there are people that say "FSCK the EULA" and hackintosh. I can only see this useful for college students that need a mac and didn't buy one with their tuition, but the mac lab is on a time-slot and you need a few extra hours. From that point of view, it's worth $16 for an extra 3 hours a day for a month, but other than that, it's kinda a waste :/ What do you guys think?
  9. By "looks like it's for binary hacking". I was referring to it listing all the functions in a Lib, and I can see the Wine/ReactOS developers (or game crackers) using that for figuring out how to implement a lib or for crackers to remove DRM in Games. I've used hex editors before, I remember hacking Adobe Air to open links from tweetdeck into xdg-open (whatever my default browser is) instead of firefox. That was before tweetdeck open links in Chrome. Those were Good Times
  10. lol, human error I tried the SDL_mixer.lib, but it didn't work in MinGW, but that's because I wrote the #include wrong, I thought it couldn't read the lib. If you wanna see what it is, I put in a download link ;)
  11. Dependency Walker looks like a tool for hacking binaries and it looks intimidating to use. [quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1329157244' post='4912673'] You do know that SDL_mixer is an extension to SDL, right? So if you're project doesn't use [url="http://www.libsdl.org/"]SDL[/url], I'm not sure whether it works as standalone. There are also pre-built MinGW builds of SDL_mixer. [/quote] The why does the download page offer a SDL-devel-1.2.15-mingw32.tar.gz and not a SDL_mixer-devel-1.2.15-mingw32.tar.gz ? I could only find pre-compiled [i]runtime [/i]libraries, not non-Visual C++ [i]buildtime. [/i](I can't use visual studio) I tried early versions of my code that didn't use SDL_mixer and it worked because I had the SDL and the SDLmain files ending with .a and .la, those are the Static libs for MinGW, I couldn't find a SDL_mixer.a/SDL_mixer.la for MinGW [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/sad.png[/img]
  12. Hey, I'm new here and I have issues with SDL_mixer in Windows. My problem is I HATE IDES! I My favourite IDE is GCC/G++ and a Text Editor. The UI of IDEs just gets in my way and It's easier for me to use flags than to have a menu system that's it's easy to break things. That's a problem with SDL_mixer, they only have static libs for Visual C++, not MinGW They do have a source code where it's too much BS to look for buildtime dependencies in Windows. In Linux that's easy, [code]# apt-get build-dep libsdl-mixer-1.2[/code] In Windows, I have to find out what the dependencies are, find them, find out what are the dependencies for my dependencies, find them, etc. (apt automates that stuff) So, I would like to know a solution to this that doesn't involve building dependencies or using visual studio.