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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

BradyHearn

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  1. Reloadead_[quote name='Reloadead_' timestamp='1334863773' post='4932920'] I guess it kind of depends on the game you are making. If the game is trying to tell a convincing story such elements might be out of place. One thing that also comes to mind is the movie The Life Aquatics with Steve Zissou. Perhaps you can make the game character be aware that he/she/it is in a game and let it talk about specific things: "Ha, this hill is blocking my view, I bet the designers didn't want me to see what is behind it yet to up the suspense!" or stuff like that. I think this is a fun thing to think about, how you could handle such things without disrupting the suspension of disbelief if you still want to make a compelling story or anything, certainly not impossible, but might be challenging. I guess this is why some developers also add a developer commentary version of the game with their title to show how they did things though. [/quote] Totally, this would kill your suspension of disbelief in most normal gameplay, as it would in a normal film. But what if a designer made a puzzle for you to solve that they themselves didnt know the specific outcome and it would be based off of decisions [i]you[/i] made, letting the game developer actually tell you why he made you do what he did, to get the response he got out of you. I suppose the 'developer' could in this case be switched with a 'character who is creating a puzzle for you' and there wouldnt be anything special..... [quote name='NaturalNines' timestamp='1334943584' post='4933298'] I would advise avoiding it, since by placing yourself in the story you run the risk of stealing the show or focusing on yourself. A big ego can derail a story or make a character come off as a douche, and, no offense, but based on your model-esque picture my guess is you have a big ego. I always stick to using facets of personalities rather than inserting the whole person into the game to avoid that problem, since cognitive dissonance can be a bitch (I have a huge ego). This way I run less a risk of minimizing or glossing over the character's flaws. Just a thought. [/quote] Well, its just a discussion idea, I try not to offend with my picture. [quote name='peakdap24' timestamp='1334994782' post='4933458'] I don't think he has a big ego because of his picture. It's more professional than most pictures on this website. [/quote] thanks [quote name='kseh' timestamp='1334946609' post='4933310'] Closest example I can think of is [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_British"]Lord British[/url] in the Ultima series. But that's more like putting a developer's role playing character into a game than having the developer in the game as himself. Personally, I'm not so sure that I'd want an in game character or a voice over explaining to me that I can't cross the river because it's actually the at the extent of the array that holds the tile map. Or even that the rescuing of a particular character is an allegory for something or other which gives the game a whole deeper meaning. I'd rather recognize those things on my own. [/quote] Yes, but it would lead to interesting challenges in design, it reminds me of a scene In Mulholland Drive where you are watching a scene presented as part of the movie, until cameras slowly pulls back and you realize that you're in a tv studio. The deception Lynch pulls with the camera work makes the audience feel uneasy that the camera is telling them the whole truth about the scene, thus uneasy about what the director wants them to perceive, in a way, putting him in the film...
  2. Im curious, has anyone ever come to the question of whether they should put themselves into a game, or even had to make that choice? When Im working with film directors, especially with more documentary type films, but even other genres, there is always an absolute decision made on day one whether the filmmaker will be included in the film or not. For example with film, you can be asking questions to a subject(s) and only use their answers(edited answers) as the narration to the film and never show that you are directly involved. For example in game design, you could be narrating about why you are making the gameplay go in a certain direction and why you are doing what you are doing to the game player. This may all seem a little pointless, but I am curious if it has ever been thought of this deeper than I can think of it. Thanks! Brady Hearn
  3. Tim Schafer's Psychonauts is, in a way, based on dreaming, except that someone else is entering into another mind, without control over that mind, making it a very subconscious, dreamlike, experience... What would be awesome to see would be a game that is a little more 'Nightmare on Elm Street' based. Where the main character has to embattle daemons in his own mind that maybe enter through an external source... Think of all you could do with the worlds! (and the music!!) Brady Hearn
  4. Thanks so much Nate, I took care of the autoplay issue and went over to a Soundcloud widget, which is nice because it isnt flash, so people can play my reels with ipads and iphones. Im not sure if they have a volume control on soundcloud, but thats a good idea too, since Ive been limiting my music to -0.1 dB, so it does come off as fairly loud. Also, over the past 2 weeks Ive had access to Lawrence Manchester's (howard shore's mixer) studio, so Ive taken the opportunity to to bounce every stem from my reel and remix in his studio after-hours, its made a big difference because I could actually hear clearly, both the high and low ends. Thanks again Nate! Regards, Brady
  5. Thank you, this is very useful! Although I've been working on music and sound design for years, the one element Im never completely confident on is creating SFX, its a whole other world. If anyones worked with foley artist, you know how crazy they're jobs are, and how detailed their work is(i.e. filename: Stiletto_on_gravel_Left_V1, Stiletto_on_gravel_RightV7) Brady Hearn www.bradyhearn.com
  6. Thanks Nathan, thats all great advice, Im glad we have people like you on this board. I've been working on the 'getting my stuff out there' part lately to good success, if you have a sec, let me know what you think of my presentation www.bradyhearn.com Thanks again! Brady