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timetopat

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About timetopat

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  1. After reading a thread on a gamedev subreddit, there came the topic of open source games.  The person claimed that they are less secure than their counterparts with the source code that is closed.  He said it was easier for people to see the inner workings of the server and exploit, compared to the black box approach of not knowing how the server works.  This does not seem correct to me however.   Open Arena seems to be ok and is open source.  Also if a lot of logic is done on the server side, wouldn't it be just as hard to cheat?  Are open source multiplayer games less secure?  What have I not considered? Thank you, I am very curious about this topic.
  2. Linux support Stretch goals, a little confused

    Thanks for the replies. I am looking forwards to your article MrJoshL. And those are some very good points Servant of the Lord.  I guess its not only how big the pie is but how big your slice of the pie is.  If you have a huge pie but a tiny slice that might not be as good as a smaller pie and a big slice. If anyone has anything else to add that would be great.
  3. I see a lot of game developers on kickstarter and other crowd sourcing platforms state that if they reach a certain amount of money they will support Linux desktop.  I see this generates publicity on some of the smaller tech forums I go on.  My question to the season gamedevers is did you find it important to support Linux? Some games I see that are built with cross platform tools go with Windows and Mac, but not always Linux like some unity games.   I know that there was a lot of posts on really big game news sites a while back about steam for Linux , but looking at the steam hardware survey http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey it appears that windows is around 90 percent of all of its users, if not more.   And Linux use over the last couple months fell slightly every month.   So did you find it valuable to support Linux?   Thanks
  4. I recently upgrade windows 7 to try out windows 8. I remember reading speculations about how some companies were afraid of the windows store being built into it and so I wanted to see what the modern ui/metro and the store was all about. For me metro looked cool but most of the time I was in desktop mode. I didn't use the store that often and when I did it was to purchase a game like ilomilo plus. Do you use the windows 8 store on your desktop? Or are most of the users of it on the tablets? I ask because a lot of reviews for games and applications I see mention how great it is on their tablet. And I was some what confused by this.
  5. I like to program and I am in the google summer of code. On the day of its start i got into a car accident and broke my collar bone. My left arm (my dominant one) cannot be used for at least a month while i heal. Coding with my right hand is lengthy and error prone. Is there any way I can write code with one hand in a way that would be effective? I read about voice recognition programs but some people on the ubuntu board said not to do that for programming in python. I am using ubuntu for the project i am working on. thanks
  6. Thank you for the advice. I see what you are saying and I thank you for the leads(Linear algebra,into to computer graphics,etc). The reason I brought up assembly was because I took a course on it and it was very painful for me and it was the lowest level things I dealt with. That is why I thought that if one argues to go lower level you could eventually hit assembly and eventually hit a why bother.
  7. I am someone who uses unity 3d and a lot of engines and some very high level frame works a lot. I was thinking to myself recently that I dont know how many of these things work, or in fact why. I dont know why 2d coordinates start in the top left corner, nor how 3d graphics seem to work. I just know that they do. This troubled me and I wanted to learn more. I figured as someone who wanted to specialize in software development It would be good to focus on those topics. I know a lot of java and I decided maybe I should look at LWJGL and try that library. It seems great. A way to use many gl calls in java and learn about more advanced topics. I then was reading that JmonkeyEngine used LWJGL and that it would be a better idea to use that because in the end i would be (at best) recreating that tool. This started to perplex me about how abstraction works with what I type in to how it actually works. I then thought to myself maybe it would be best to use regular OpenGL and SDL instead of LWJGL to learn. This got me thinking that you could infinitely go down the chain of lower level languages and Ideas until you got to binary. So after that long winded post, how much abstraction is good in learning about how to develop a game and its systems? Or is it best to use the highest level tool you have because one could argue," why not use assembly", and even lower level stuff. I like Java a lot and I am not a big fan of manual memory management, but is this ok if I want to learn more about how games work using java and LWJGL? Thanks
  8. I have made a couple simple android games that i like to show my friends but one problem always gets in the way and that is the controls. Some ideas I have dont always seem to work with the touch control scheme and the screen size. I was told that a tablet has more screen size to play with. In my search for a control idea I saw microsofts xna frame work and it looked awesome. I could make games for the xbox and or windows phone 7( I own an xbox but not the latter so I guess just xbox in this case). This looked amazing. I was wondering if there were any other hardware manufacturers that let you make indie games on their platform like microsoft does? I looked up for sony for example and i saw the playstation suit but the wiki article was old and it said it was outdated. Thanks
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