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Sayid Ahmed

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  1. I think a sandbox MMO could do very well as long as it's delivered and finished properly. Eve Online has a strong following but its genre can put people off. Mortal Online is conceptually great but implemented quite badly with many bugs and bad animations. Darkfall is an imitation to Mortal Online and doesn't bring much new to the table. All of which have quite loyal followings, although varying in size. The latter two games suffer from being unpolished.
  2. I think the best way to pull this off is to have it faction-orientated. People protect each other in their little settlements, forts, stations etc and have the choice of venturing outside and potentially be hunted or ambushed. This also encourages co-operation of players. Limit the amount of carrying items and then full loot doesn't sound too bad.
  3. I think that's a good approach before committing to a big (and potential expensive) project. You'll notice that some games, such as indie MMOs (look up Path of Exile) or niche games like Minecraft which you mentioned, bloom as a result of the developers keeping in contact with their following as they watch each other develop and have fun. I think minimalism goes well with independent development.
  4. IMO: For RPGs, maybe the combat - because everything else is going to be similar or on par with each other. For FPS, probably the multiplayer features. Killing Floor is one of the best multiplayer co-ops and I've been playing for almost a year straight. For strategy games, like Total War series, probably the variety of units and functions - the more planning and thinking the better. For TBS strategy, like Civ, probably the trivia - the interesting policies, the fun diplomacy, good graphics and stuffs. But remember, this is a very subjective topic. Some indie games are loved by their communities because almost everything about them is unique. Look at Mount and Blade, as an example - what other game allows you to hire a bunch of peasant recruits and then train them up to become knights and soldiers and go claim your own little fiefdom in a feudal world full of war, bandits and trade, whilst being able to take part in the heat of battle with full customisation of your character?
  5. Try Mortal Online's mechanic. From what I understand it's basically grind less - you can prepare yourself for PvP in a week. It's more of a factor of how good you are with the action of fighting. It's also more crafting orientated; getting hold of the right metals and catalysts to create the right weapons and armour. That may not be exactly true for Mortal Online but nonetheless it's a thought. If you look at Mount and Blade, your character advances through better item capability and better companions. Skills are more important in the leadership and party management sense than in the personal development. Again, it's action based so your style of fighting > your level. Alternatively, if your game isn't action based, what you suggested above with experience being a function of time is not bad at all.
  6. This is always a tough one, how about: [b]Even Faction Size Mechanic[/b] [left]Allow players to have the choice of faction along with diminishing returns on the size of a faction[/left] [b]Summary[/b] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]Players can join an existing one or create their own small one. Joining a large one leads to more protection and item sharing, but limited responsibility or involvement. Roles within a faction, such as Marshall of War, or Minister of Treasury, can only be filled by one person, can go through cycles to create fairness but only really appeal to experienced players. Players who become more experienced and want an active role can create an off-shoot faction. To add more to the mix, maybe attacking larger factions reaps more rewards? Or requires more administration costs?[/size][/font][/color][/left] [b]Addressed player motivation[/b] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]To prevent player dissatisfaction; promote co-operation through real life friendship etc; preventing the creation of overly large factions and superpowers.[/size][/font][/color][/left] [b]Used in what game[/b] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]Not that I know of[/size][/font][/color][/left] [b]Predicted impact[/b] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]+Balancing the size of all factions[/size][/font][/color][/left] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]+Freedom of players to chose allegiance[/size][/font][/color][/left] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]+Opportunities for players to have significant roles[/size][/font][/color][/left] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]-Creation of many small factions; creation of coalitions and reversing the purpose of this mechanic[/size][/font][/color][/left] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]-Constant migration of players[/size][/font][/color][/left] [left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3]-Difficult for new players to understand; may automatically join the big factions, not knowing the disadvantages[/size][/font][/color][/left]
  7. Thank you for that detailed response.
  8. You make a lot of good points. Sorry about the NPC thing I was referring to how some games have NPCs that just sell infinite amounts of resources. I'm not making an MMO really, just a text based political, military and economic simulation kind of game thing. I'm thinking of playing Mortal Online after the new update and that is really sandbox economy PvP and bla bla driven.
  9. My reputation has gone from +6 to -4, to +4, and back down to -2, and I've only been a member for a couple of weeks. Is this normal, or am I loathed by some very sensitive people? This [url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/622081-breaking-in-help-strategies-and-critiques/page__p__4926524#entry4926524"]post here[/url] got me -2, what the hell did I do to upset someone, lol?
  10. [quote name='Stormynature' timestamp='1333035218' post='4926367'] Brakes are for ... Pocket rocket racers This is my rental Gas Guzzlers Roadhogs Petrolheads Armchair racers Backseat drivers Sunday drivers More to come but going to sleep - all the best with your game [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] [/quote] You have inspired me to conjure the following: Benzine Electric Chair Racers Frontseat & Backseat Drivers [with the slogan of 'which seat shall you take?'] Friday Drivers
  11. [quote name='Goutetsu' timestamp='1332846738' post='4925627'] I admit that your comment about making a text-based game brought a smile to my face because, while studying Computer Science in college some eleven years ago, I was instructed in the absolute basics of Turbo Pascal 6 and proceeded to use the language to construct my magnum opus, 'The Castle of Deceit', a sprawling, path-branching, and doubtlessly crap, tale of swords and wizardry that, in essence, was a 'Choose Your Own Adventure Story' in digital format. This is, as best as I can remember, the only full game I have ever programmed, though I'm now going to try to put something together in StencylWorks in a bid to get the creative juices flowing again. Thanks for the advice and good luck with your text-based adventure. I'm sure it'll turn out a hell of a lot better than mine did. [/quote] Hehe, no worries mate. It's not always about how great the product is, but what you learnt from it and how you can transfer those skills! And besides, PHP is a lot different to Turbo Pascal 6, I'd imagine. With the website, may be you want to get a more flexible/modular blog script? I've never dealt with blogs so I can't help you there, but I'm sure there's a simple solution. Good luck.
  12. An NPC only providing basic materials for crafting is almost the same as the players gathering basic materials through mining/farming/extraction for crafting. Just one has a different label and interface to the other. You're pumping resources into the system at the player's request, at some cost, albeit maybe a small cost, whether it's money or time or inconvenience. You could have a regional bias in the resource extraction, but like you say, you could also regionalise the supply chain of the NPC vendors, depending on the game. But from a net wealth balance it's exactly the same (value in - value out = accumulation). [quote name='ImmoralAtheist' timestamp='1333063577' post='4926482'] Summary: Players can sell goods to npc vendors, which will increase supply of that good (globally or in a region), which will reduce prices. Players can buy goods from an npc vendor, which will decrease supply of that good, and this will increase prices. NPC vendors should sell most types of goods available. Additionaly, the game should be made so that every item sold by a vendor, must be found or crafted by players. I do think this is a good solution for mmorpgs, and in mmort's this could be a marketplace (only individual supply per marketplace, compared to regional/global supply for npc vendor). [/quote] Mortal Online is planning to implement a broker system; an NPC waits in town and you make them trade your goods to buyers, but with a transactional fee. That way your physical presence isn't required for trade and it sinks some of the money in the game. I believe that's the same as what you're describing? [quote name='ImmoralAtheist' timestamp='1333063577' post='4926482'] In EVE Online, buying/selling goods is done by putting up buy orders and sell orders, and these are located at specific station (the goods will stay at the same station). Personally I find this a bit to much. After loosing a ship, I spent simply to long time buying a new ship and with a decent fitting, where the parts were not bought at ridicilous prices. An npc vendor/market offers simplicity. You buy and sell everything instantly and one item has one price. In mmorpg games, like WOW, you do have auction houses, but I find these very impractical. Just as in EVE, they're very time consuming. Note that for items that are very rare and expensive, direct player transactions or auction house is probably the best. [/quote] What you need to remember is that convenience isn't always great; well ok, it is good for most games, but for an economy-driven game it isn't. Sometimes you want to subtly guide your players to play one way (the barter system is an example of a harsh option). Eve Online works because its players are greedy and want to destroy each other. They think that way because they are in control of who makes profit and who suffers. Stability may be great in the real world, but in the virtual world you want boom and bust of different players/guilds at different times. Again, this all goes back to what is the endgame - I'm biasing towards an economy-driven game with lots of PvP, guild cities and all that kind of crap. A game that focuses on dungeon raids, social immersion, skill grinding, PvE etc, would probably want a very predictable, controllable and stable economy. If I was playing WoW, or Rift or any of the latter types, I wouldn't want to spend months leveling up a top character only to find that the type of weapons I've skilled up in have spiraled into high cost and suddenly my character is rendered crap because of the irresponsibility of the wider virtual society. Oh and before someone smites me, I'm not saying economic-driven PvP is the best idea in the world! It's just [i]an[/i] idea of a good MMO and it has been executed in some games.
  13. Rubber Soul Burners Racing Gadgets RPG Racing Racists Super Mega Car Racing Gadget Racing Racers Kars
  14. [quote name='Stormynature' timestamp='1332958401' post='4926075'] You might give some consideration to making money (coin) a focussed resource as well. One way in which I could see this utilised: Each country produces it's own coinage - inflation/deflation becomes the control mechanism on its purchasing power. Utilising precious metal resources to produce the coins would open up another use for the metals as well as defining a limit on how many coins could be produced. Not to mention the creation of a monetary exchange system. Backing the coin with an actual value i.e. the gold standard would tie up precious metals kept as backing for the coins value or alternatively the coin itself is made of gold..in which case if gold suddenly became very valuable would melting down the coins suddenly be viable and correspondingly forcing an increase in bartering as the amount of coin diminishes. [/quote] That definitely sounds good mate, might be hard to implement in my game but perhaps it can give a better function for the 'precious metal' resource in mine. i don't know if this has been used elsewhere. Perhaps it would be easier to have one universal currency which could have its uses in things which other resources do not, like paying wages or funding research or skills. Nonetheless I'll take what you said into account. [quote name='hustlerinc' timestamp='1332958546' post='4926076'] In this 1 transaction, the real resource of value is the copper. But the gold helps the players buy this copper. What if the buyer only had oil, a crate of oil might be worth 200 copper bars. and he only needs 5. He might not want 195 copper bars lying around. That is why currency is good. This is why we have used it for 4 thousand years. If you don't get it this time I give up. [/quote] As I said for about the 5th time, currency is great for exchanging goods. Well lets put this bluntly, hustlerinc. It is impossible for the player to profit [i]by selling to the NPC[/i] without finding a cheaper alternative, such as loot or theft or by-product of resource extraction. And what did I say before? Almost exactly that. In the case you have explained, the player [i]must sell to another player[/i] who does not have the benefit of an NPC. And what did I say before? You cannot have a good economy with just NPCs, you have to have some free market for players to make profit and here we are - a situation where the NPC cannot provide the excess of goods to the player's demand and thus another player must provide this on a private trade. And why does this mechanic control inflation? - because you're introducing a reliable exchange to convert a currency into a more hard or functional asset or service within in the game. Effectively introducing a money sink. And I wonder I said at the start when I introduced this topic? And this other stuff about resources must be useless to someone? Well, as a dev you have to design this problem out of the game. As I said... I hope we are all getting the picture now.
  15. [quote name='hustlerinc' timestamp='1332955237' post='4926057'] It's obvious, unless the player pays what the seller wants, the seller simply goes to an NPC. And you are the one to mention bulk, i am comparing same amount whatever the price. bulk of 10 could be 100 gold and 105 gold, it would be retarded to sell for less than what the NPC offers wouldn't it?[/quote] No I am sorry it is not obvious. Why would you even bother going to a player vendor to buy copper when you can buy copper from the NPC, unless like I originally said, the vendor can get hold of it even cheaper than the NPC rate, e.g. theft, loot, etc [quote name='Sayid Ahmed' timestamp='1332954018' post='4926047'] Why would the oil vendor give away something of [i]less[/i] worth? They'd be losing money. Misunderstanding me again, the oil vendor might not need 14 shovels from the shovel producer just to meet the worth of HIS oil, the oilvendor doesn't give extra items to get rid of the oil obviously that would be retarded. But every item is not useful to every player, thats why economy was introduced in the first place, the first account of currency is from 2000 B.C. Do the math, why would you want to go backwards in your game? [/quote] Of course I am going to misunderstand you if you make no sense. Why would you even put non-useful items into the game? If however, you mean, one resource is not useful from the perspective of the oil vendor, then he's not going to trade oil for that resource and the value of that resource is now reduced. Why would I want to go backwards? Sorry, but WTF does that even mean? [quote name='Sayid Ahmed' timestamp='1332954018' post='4926047'] I think the contrary will happen, players will have a difficult time getting rid of the accumulated goods without a general currency, and a economy like this is very much dependant of the community, how exactly will that community grow? dont expect to get full servers and flowing exchange in the beginning. Anyway I don't know if you misunderstand me on purpose or are too in love with your idea to understand my points. I'm not trying to change your opinion, my last posts have been trying to explain my first post. Let me know how successful your economy is once the game is released. [/quote] LOL what? Why does it suddenly have to be difficult if every player needs to either trade or fight in this game? How will that community grow? Ever heard of a mechanism known as advertising or marketing, perhaps? Don't expect to get full servers in the beginning? No, I never said I would. And why would it have to be [i]full [/i]in order to function? Too in love with my idea? What idea? When did I even propose my game idea here? I am just summarising real life economics in a basic way that can be implemented into a game! You, however, are talking crap that makes no sense to me whatsoever. Unless someone else could please clarify your points in a manner in which I am capable to comprehend, other than the idea of NPC for basic goods, everything you've said seems illogical to me. And when did I ever say I will make a successful game? I'm merely having a discussion. Whether my ideas are brilliant or absolutely stupid doesn't matter because it is the implementation of making a game in the final run that matters - we are not discussing that part of the process. You are trying to make me sound pretentious when I'm really not. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/dry.png[/img]