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vcjr12

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  1. So I've been in this game programming process for years, and I'm not where I should be respectibly to myself and my goals. But A few months back I decided that my knowledge accumulated over the years learning C++, C, C#, and Java, that although I wondered to a point where I could make a functional game, procratination and lack of motivation killed my way. So to revive my own effort to atleast create one game after life had turned more serious for me in other aspect I decided to learn python and make a game there. This is just me showing how it will look and what I have so far. I call the game PowerC. Knowing myself I decided that a framework that sounded interesting and like something that I love would fit great with staying on task so I used the Bacon framework.   Name: PowerC Language: Python Framework: Bacon Game Engine Game Description: You are a Turrent Spaceship flying around with 5 lives that run throught the whole game. Their are level but for each level they are limited ammount of live refills that pop up. While you progress the ammount of enemies(missiles) flying towards you increase, periodically getting more intensive as the game progresses. You win by finishing 10 total level without losing all lives.   Progress: Window - Screen can display graphics, and updates   Player - Player Controller is set up can move all directions. The Turrent Follows the mouse directions, while still attached to the base.   Mechanics - Player Border, Game Logs Postions Note: It's not much, everything has been hit and miss but progress is progress way more than I did in 4 years. Only challenge I had was having to calculate the mouse location and rotating the turrent acording to follow it.
  2. DX11

    I have a quick Question currently my video card supports Directx 10.1 would a simple DirectX11 work with it??
  3. SO I searched around and I found this site [url="http://rastertek.com/tutindex.html"]http://rastertek.com/tutindex.html[/url] its looks really cool since they also have Directx 10 and 9 there just in case I wanto try those out. But I'm not sure if this would be a good way to learn SlimDx at the same part. What I really want to know is what part of the tutorials will i be taking and translating into SlimDX?? Since I can't understand most of the things there with C++, I also don't wanna spent time learning the syntax which would be complicated while learning 2 other things at the same time. Please respond
  4. I think Ill use the Tao and OpenTK . Thanks again. ps. Still open to suggestions.
  5. @Reloadead_: Thanks for the reply, will check that out. @FLeBlanc: lol, im 15 now. I get what your saying that since I quit so many times am I sure I won't lose interest again. And your question about what I trully want to do. Well my answer to that Is yes(as a hobby), and that reason for me quiting learning so many times before was becuase I had very little time, I also din't know english that well since I came here when I was 8 but at such a young age my expectations were high and my goals were to fast for my little knowledge. But like I said , now that I know what I really have to do in order to achive those worthy goal , I can progress without questioning if im going to be quiting any time soon(which im not). Hopefully that explained more on what I was trying to say. Btw when I meant any frameworks like XNA i meant what Reloaded_ suggested me which is fine. But thanks again for your reply, made me reflect in the pass alittle bit.
  6. I just recently joined (again) gamedev.net lost the password and email for my last account, I signed up on 2009 when i was about 10 or 11 and programming was something I always tried to do but din't understand that much(maybe it was my small brain [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img] ) I came on and off in learning Until I actually bought c++ books and a SDL one too. But I never got to really learn anything out of them. But what I do like about me going early into learning programming is that I know most of the concept and syntax of the language, either way its been years and I forgoten But some of the knowledge still remains. Then a year ago I got into c# I know the basics and how Object-Oriented Programming works, made it more far into learning then when i was younger but I took a break now about 1-2 months ago I got into Unity 3d, and its been great I'm now on a team working on this Pirate Ship vs Ship game and It's going good so far. But I feel like I want too advance more, not get stuck with simple programming in the Unity engine since most of the things are mostly there if you know what I mean. That it doents let you create from the beggining I understand this is a great thing if you want fast development, but I like taking the long way in things. So yesturday I gave it a try into XNA did this tutorial on making some textures apear on the screen and basic input making them move. I felt great because I dint see the old 3d views and stuff and I actually got more controll of what I was making even if it was more work which i don't care because I enjoy doing it. [b]To get to the point , I want to know are their other c# frameworks to make games like XNA, I know they are for Python and other languages like Javascript etc... Since I don't wanna be stuck in the future with just developing games for only windows and the Xbox. or are their other languages out there with frameworks that make it a little easier to make a game engine. [/b]Again Hello again to the community , and hopefully that big text block din't kill ya. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif[/img]