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MichaelRPennington

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  1. Unity

    Thanks a lot guys. I'll keep studying up. +1 for both of you
  2. Unity

    Well, I know basic C++, but I just don't know how to apply it to my situation. I'd really like to use C++ rather than Python... Working with Python makes me realize that I'm not a big fan of blank space. I like encapsulation... Give me the good ol' curly brackets any day [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img] Basic input would be interesting, I was wondering how I should catalog and reference commands... Should I do a string of if statements, or store them in an array, list or dictionary? My basic command structure should end up being something simple, such as '[action] [target]' like Attack Goblin, or Open Inventory, or Open Door. This seems simple enough. We can just take the input string and split it by a delimiter, such as a space or '>', so the input could look like 'attack>goblin', and then reference it with the list of commands and functions to call... My question is, what method to go about call the functions once the game realizes what command you have given... Oof, why does C++ make everything so complicated? Even something as simple as splitting a string is drawn out to an unreasonable extent... It makes me miss Java.
  3. I'm currently fiddling around with a few other ideas that will allow new and old players to experience the world they influenced.... Brainstorming...
  4. Ye have little faith, lol. For something like this, levels would be nonexistent. It would have to be good ol' skill. As far as the game content goes, why have every player experience the same things? Why not have a game have an actual living history? Expansions wouldn't have to be released commercially. You could update the game via a patching system. You could make the game a digital download and pay to play for further development. Still brainstorming...
  5. I'll think about that and try to find a way to make it work where no content is missed.... I love a challenge.
  6. I just happened to pop-in here... Check out [url="http://toolkitzone.com"]http://r[/url][url="http://rpgtoolkit.net"]pgtoolkit.net[/url]. This is wonderful software for developing 2D sprite-based games. It comes with almost everything you need. The only other thing you'll have to download is a music composition software. I suggest Anvil Studio. It already has its own built-in coding language called RPGCode which isn't difficult and has a full reference available to you. Once you have completed your game you can make it into an EXE and distribute it as you please. This software is designed for top-down RPGs, it can be used for creating a whole slew of games, including a platformer. Are you sure you mean platformer? Because the way you described the battles as 'Final Fantasy', I was thinking turn-based, which would be unique for a platformer. I just thought it would be a better solution for you.
  7. Yeh, then I guess in that case it would be a matter of, I believe it was mentioned before, removing the in-game player market. Well, at least that would be the simple solution. Another solution would be to have an in-game appraisal system that will reference what monster the item came from and the difficulty of obtaining said item, cross referencing it with current economic state, and the current Supply/Demand for that item, and setting the appropriate price for the item. Let the user toggle a 5% difference in lowest/highest current market value, down/up, but let no one go below/above 15% from the standard current market value. Just a thought.
  8. I'm not saying it would be easy by any means. Something like this would be extremely complex, and balances would have to be put in place, but as it says in my signature, nothing is impossible. You can always find a way to do something. I know the way I posted it was kind of restrictive and lack luster, but it was just an example. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img] Oof, I don't know how to make it any better for people that don't want to get involved in the game at its core... I've always been one to get immersed.
  9. I'm not sure if this could be considered on-topic, but, going off of this NPC talk we're getting into, the delivery of the quest is also important. As Servant of the Lord said, adding depth and character to our NPCs could not only enhance the player experience, but open a gateway to allow ourselves to expand upon the content of the quests and the player's immersion into the game. Most RPGs contain several cookie-cutter NPCs that look alike and spout useless information. This is an attempt to fill space; to give an illusion of life to the scene. What if we cut this out? What if we only had unique NPCs? What if we took the time to give every NPC a personality? What if we let the character get know these NPCs and grow an affection for or hate these NPCs. Then, we have created this relationship between the player and the game that will cause the quests that they give to the player have more of an impact on their emotional state while experiencing the game. The idea of creating a relationship between in-game characters and the player is by no way a new concept, but is one that is for the most part lost in online RPGs. If you could add in these relationships, then a whole new world of deep and meaningful quests (as well as relevant to the player as he/she now feels like she knows them) will open to you. I hope this rant helps [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] On the topic of player created quests: I believe it is entirely possible. This could be carried out in contracts. Simply, you could set the type of quest - Hunt, Gather, Explore, whatever - then set the requirements then the rewards, have the player post them, and then someone would come along, accept the quest, complete it, and turn in the contract. This could be easily achieved through a central hub, such as a location in your game called something like the 'Adventurer's Guild'. Anything will do along these lines. This is only one idea, I'm sure there are tons of other options to choose from if you just sit and ponder it a bit more. I also noticed you were looking for an incentive for players to provide/use the quest service. Well, you could have a point system associated with the quest system. EXAMPLE: You have a quest system comprising of quests given by NPCs. Upon completion of these quests, you are given your reward and a number of what we will call Quest Tokens (QT), dependent upon the difficulty of the quest. Once you have built up enough of these Quest Tokens, you may post a quest in the Guild's Contract Board, and offer these QT as a reward. One could trade these QT for other items from this Adventurer's Guild, or for gold, etc. The possibilities are endless.' Oh, and if you removed all story-telling elements of a quest, then it would lose its relevance to the player. There has to be a reason why the player is doing what he/she is doing. Without reason, why do?
  10. I can't say that there is a specific type of quest I'd like to see. All I look for is relevance. Nothing pains me more than walking around doing menial tasks just for the sake of progressing through a bland story. If you are going to create quests, make them relevant to the player. Make the player believe that what he/she is doing is worth it. It's basic immersion.
  11. Oh, yes, definitely. I totally see where you're coming from. A good balance for PK rushes, is, you could bring in an item, such as a recall scroll or stone or something to that effect, that will either take you back to the nearest town or to another area within a certain range, etc. Make these pretty common and plentiful. This way, it gives the player a way to avoid certain death. Fight until you have 1 hp left and zip out of their in a flash! It would be one of those 'must have' items that are so known for in great games. A thought on balancing the ranged classes - I like the reduced fire rate. Have your character set an arrow/bolt, draw the bow or cock the crossbow, and the aim and release (having to take into account wind - if you choose to have it - and drop). Not only that, but taking the time to hit the enemy in a vulnerable enough place to stop it from rushing you would be no easy task. If you ever shoot a bow, the longer you hold it drawn, the more you fatigue, and you will start to shake. A good example of this, although it can be done better and should, is Fable's archery. In the case of PvP, Melee vs. Ranged, Melee is going to be much more mobile that a ranged class (moving an aiming is NOT easy, you have to take in to account target movement as well as your own), so not only could you dodge incoming arrows, but if they didn't manage to hit you in a vulnerable spot, you could still close space and engage. Archery would take tremendous skill, but yield tremendous reward. Casting would take time and concentration. You would have to conjure your spell and then release it. If it is a sustained spell, you will have to remain immobile in order to maintain concentration on the spell; if it is something as small as a fireball, movement is possible and it has a short cast time, but you would still have to aim your shot. The possibilities are endless. If you ever decide to develop this game, I would much like to be a part of the design team.
  12. I'm just going to add a little bit to this... I don't think you'd want to make the game center around the idea of PvP, give the players something worse to fear in the PvE that will deter them from focusing on this. Another thing: make the players self-sufficient. This way, anything they have they have to work for in order to obtain, no easy way out, no shortcuts, just hard work. Make things take time, not instantaneous. Make the common PK'r think twice about what exactly he has to lose before attacking another player. I'm just saying, I like the idea, I've always liked the idea, and even thought of game designs that would follow this concept. It's a hardcore gamer's game. You'd have to search and scavenge for food, ingredients for potions, materials for your armor. You'd have to work and fight to survive, so then when you reach the pinnacle of greatness, you can look down upon the other players and say - "Yes, I actually accomplished this." But then you have to also think about the environmental aspect I was speaking of earlier. Are you likely to attack another player if you yourself are being chased by a pack of hell-hounds hot on your heels? What about a deity system, where the good are rewarded and the wicked punished? What about a reputation system that will recognize players as moral or immoral beings, and alert guards and such of your intentions? Lot's of ways to balance it, just don't look at it so cut-and-dry... The thing I've noticed, is that people like to focus on one aspect of a game, even the designers, which blows my mind. EDIT: Oh, but I have to disagree with your exclusion of ranged classes. This can be balanced too by gameplay adjustments. Make aiming or casting a spell require effort and skill, and BAM, you don't have to worry about getting ganked across a field by every archer/caster that comes your way. I can even design systems to counter these issues if you'd like me to. I have a vast imagination, and am not picky about handing out ideas.
  13. Ah, Bwight, very nice example! Thank you for your contribution!
  14. Then the question becomes, how to make them work, not that they are impossible or not feasible. So, how do you think you could make this work? Either idea, you don't have to use both. And remember, these ideas are not "to scale" they were just short descriptions to give a general idea of the concept.
  15. Alright, well, I've had a few systems that could spice a game up to some extent. I'd like to hear some feedback and discussion on the matter. Let's get started, shall we? [b]Persistent & Dynamic Economy[/b] Okay, now the title pretty much says it all, however, let's go in to more detail! Basically, you have NPCs, now, what if, wait for it, they ACTUALLY DID SOMETHING.... Yes! NPCs functioning as something else other than the wonderful conversation (heh..)! Enough of the jokes... Example: Gatherer NPC finds seeds, sells the seeds to the Farmer NPC, Farmer NPC plants and harvests them then sells them to Vendor NPC. Vendor NPC then sells to players or OTHER NPCs. This idea is more geared towards a multiplayer environment, so as the player's actions can actually affect the economy. (Steal crops from the farmer, the farmer can't sell the crops, the farmer can't buy seeds from the gatherer, the farmer can't plant anymore seeds, and finally, the farmer can't sell the crops to the vendor for the vendor to sell, and so on...) [b]Unified Massive Multiplayer Experience[/b] This means that everyone is working towards the same MAIN goal, and are affected by changes in the world that one player causes. For example, I was just recently thinking of how awesome it would be to develop a Diablo fan-game. In this rendition, it would be a multiplayer 3D third-person hack-and-slash game with a dark gothic feel. Well, it would follow the story of Diablo II, but everyone would be involved, new and veteran players; however, this would be different from most MMOGs, as in the bosses are the only bosses and will not respawn magically from the pits of hell... The only thing to respawn would be your common enemies and the occasional unique mob, etc.. In effect, you would really be fighting to save Sanctuary from the three Prime Evils, which would be EXTREMELY difficult. By difficult, I mean several dozen level 99 characters still trying to struggle against their immense power. I mean, it would only make sense that the three Lords of Hell might be a little epic? Anyway, this is just an example (unless someone wants to help me develop it XD jk) Wow, it seems my well has run dry all of the sudden... Well, I'll post more later if it comes to me! Please comment!