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Creslin

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About Creslin

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  1. anyone start with c++ as their first language?

    Here's my feelings on this... I basically learned programming in college, and they taught C first and then C++. I remember having a real hard time dealing with concepts like pointers, memory allocation, making data structures like linked lists, etc. But I think learning it gave me an edge over a lot of people. It just gives you a more intimate understanding of how things actually work "inside" your computer, and even if you wind up coding in C# or something else where you don't need to worry about pointers and memory addresses...that knowledge will help you. That said, I'm not sure if I would have successfully learned C or C++ as my first languages without the pressure of a university grade on me and the resources of the university to help. It really [i]can[/i] be frustrating at times. In the end, I would say give it a shot if you want, but if you find yourself struggling with pointers to the point where you want to quit, then you may want to mess with C# just to get your confidence back. Trust me, after you deal with C++, C# will be a walk in the park !
  2. Most over-rated game of all time

    [quote name='Jarwulf' timestamp='1335080503' post='4933731'] COD/Battlefield is just a dumb shooter with scarcely more complexity than Doom or wolfenstein but that is part of why it is popular. Not to many people want to bother to develop an appreciation for more complex titles. [/quote] Gonna have to disagree with this. The single player gameplay in Doom and Wolfenstein revolved around just finding keys to unlock doors and eventually get to the end of the level while killing bad guys all along...pretty simple. And the multiplayer in Doom (2?) was simple as well, it was basically just death match...kill the other guy more than he kills you. BF on the other hand has: 1. Tons of rideable vehicles offering totally different gameplay experiences such as helicopters, planes, tanks, jeeps, artillery, and anti-air. You could also consider these vehicles games in and of themselves. And both BF and CoD have: 1. Lots of different multiplayer options and game types. 2. Scripted story driven campaigns. 3. Leveling up systems in multiplayer and stat-tracking. Soooo...I know that a lot people have issues with the lack of innovation in recent CoD and BF titles, and there is definitely a good argument for this. But to say that the CoD and BF franchises are as simple as Doom and Wolfenstein is ridiculous.
  3. New amateur game dev looking for advice

    [quote name='ranakor' timestamp='1334965598' post='4933397'] [quote name='Creslin' timestamp='1334936836' post='4933255'] [quote name='jischneider' timestamp='1334890451' post='4933044'] I agreed. Unity3D and (why not?) Unreal SDK are good start points. Both have good video tutorials and Unity has the C# plus. [url="http://www.digitaltutors.com/training/unity-tutorials"]http://www.digitaltu...unity-tutorials[/url] [/quote] Thanks for the link, looks like there is a lot of good stuff on there and their prices are reasonable. For now, I'm reading the Unity 3.x Game Development Essentials book and enjoying it so far. One question though... My eventual goal (for now) is to create a 2D isometric action RPG with sprite assets. I have read that Unity is quite capable of making 2D asset games if you use the orthographic camera, but I haven't been able to find a really good example of an 2D isometric perspective game made with Unity, so I'm just a little leery. Does anyone here know if Unity is a good engine for making such a game? [/quote] While it's not isometric, simply angled view, unity comes with a default project named angrybots that will open the first time you open unity, may want to DL unity and check that out. [/quote] Yah I did check out Angry Bots, and it is very similar to the perspective I am going for, but it uses 3D assets. I'm looking to make a game that uses 2D assets (sprites). Because my artist buddy and I are making it together, but he's not familiar with 3D modeling, so I thought we would try a 2D game first. I dunno though, I'm loving Unity so much...it makes 3D so easy that I may try to convince him to learn 3D modeling .
  4. New amateur game dev looking for advice

    [quote name='jischneider' timestamp='1334890451' post='4933044'] I agreed. Unity3D and (why not?) Unreal SDK are good start points. Both have good video tutorials and Unity has the C# plus. [url="http://www.digitaltutors.com/training/unity-tutorials"]http://www.digitaltu...unity-tutorials[/url] [/quote] Thanks for the link, looks like there is a lot of good stuff on there and their prices are reasonable. For now, I'm reading the Unity 3.x Game Development Essentials book and enjoying it so far. One question though... My eventual goal (for now) is to create a 2D isometric action RPG with sprite assets. I have read that Unity is quite capable of making 2D asset games if you use the orthographic camera, but I haven't been able to find a really good example of an 2D isometric perspective game made with Unity, so I'm just a little leery. Does anyone here know if Unity is a good engine for making such a game?
  5. New amateur game dev looking for advice

    [quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1334871037' post='4932962'] [quote name='Creslin' timestamp='1334870645' post='4932961'] 2. Game engine design. I could really just use some general, theoretical help on "best practices" when it comes to building (mainly 2D) game engines. When I try to do this myself, I wind up mired in so many different possible decisions that I just don't know what I should do. Like... How do I organize all of my objects? Should the "player" object inherit from the "enemy" object? What kind of data structures do I store my world data in? Should I use a massive 2D array for the entire world? A list of 2D arrays to represent zones? So many questions...[/quote] So don't work from scratch. Pick up an existing engine, and work with that for a while, at least till you have a general feel for how game development should work. You are good at C#, so why not take a look at [url="http://unity3d.com/"]Unity[/url]? (hint: it's a dream to work with) [/quote] Thanks for the tip! I'm downloading it now, looks exciting !
  6. Hey Everyone! I recently decided to take up game development as a hobby. So far, I've been able to learn a lot from online tutorials and an XNA book that I bought (XNA by example), but there's just so many choices to make regarding what books to buy or what tutorials to invest time in, that I really feel like I need some advice on my direction! Basically, what I'm hoping for in this post is that one of you wonderful experienced game devs will just point me in the right direction of some books that you feel are really good, or tutorials that you think could help me. I would be very grateful for any kind of help here . Anyway, I realize that you won't be able to give me any direction if you don't know where I'm coming from and what I want to do...so without further ado, here is my background info: [b]My goals: [/b] I want to eventually be able to make really fun, really unique games that I could potentially sell on a digital distribution platform like Steam or XBLA. I realize this is a long way off...but it's just what I'm shooting for . [b]My knowledge/skills:[/b] 1. BS in Computer Science, so I have a good working knowledge of general programming concepts like memory management, data structures, control structures, object oriented design, etc. 2. Very good at C#. I work with it frequently at my day job. 3. Decent but rusty at C++. I just haven't worked with it in a while, but I'm sure I could pick up all of that wonderful pointer nonsense again in short order if I tried ;). 4. Beginner level knowledge at XNA. I'm reading/coding through an XNA book now, and I've done a lot of tutorials around the net. I know the basic concepts of how it works, but still have a lot to learn. [b]Where I feel I'm lacking:[/b] 1. Basic game programming concepts. Most of this is new to me. I understand how to program, but I'm not familiar with common game programming tasks like translating "screen space" to "world space" or collision detection. 2. Game engine design. I could really just use some general, theoretical help on "best practices" when it comes to building (mainly 2D) game engines. When I try to do this myself, I wind up mired in so many different possible decisions that I just don't know what I should do. Like... How do I organize all of my objects? Should the "player" object inherit from the "enemy" object? What kind of data structures do I store my world data in? Should I use a massive 2D array for the entire world? A list of 2D arrays to represent zones? So many questions... So anyway that's where I am now, and I could really use some advice on what I should be studying. I hate spending days on a book or tutorial to only realize it was a waste of time. So thank you all so much in advance for any advice you give!
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