Promit

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About Promit

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    Moderator - Graphics and GPU Programming

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  1. Yes, with caveats. You can only Discard a buffer so many times* before the driver stalls. Think of it like this: when you are doing this, your buffer is actually three buffers internally. Each time you discard, it switches from buffer 0 to 1, 1 to 2, 2 to 3, 3 to 0. But if that switch to 0 arrives while 0 is still in use, you're going to stall. So the buffer has to be big enough that you don't do this more than once or maybe twice a frame in order for the GPU to clear pending operations. It's best to make the buffer big enough to accommodate an entire frame's rendering in one go with the occasional spill. * The limit doesn't apply to constant buffers, which are magical buffers that can service thousands of discards per frame.
  2. You don't need to rebind. There may be a hit if you Map a buffer that is still in use by the GPU, depending on the flags. Choose wisely between Discard and No Overwrite. Discard will only stall if you Map it a lot without letting frames complete. It's a good choice if you only Map that buffer once a frame. No Overwrite should not stall, but may corrupt if you overwrite in-use data. It's good for streaming purposes where you never go backwards. Remember that this still counts across frames, you should Discard once before No Overwrite, or else set GPU fences. If you're lost at this stage, take a look here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dn508285(v=vs.85).aspx
  3. Make the angle negative? If you're trying to figure out the direction the truck is turning by using QuaternionToAxisAngle, that's not really a good idea. What you can do is limit the angle to 180 degrees or PI radians, and subtract 360 or 2*PI from it if it comes up higher.
  4. OpenCV

    It's a very large, expansive library with many different pieces for many different things. IME the best thing to do is have a specific project in mind and pursue the information needed to do the specific tasks required to solve that project. You can't just learn OpenCV, as such, because it's too big and none of it really makes any sense without the context of trying to accomplish something.
  5. Well, if the dialogue people are demanding stuff... they're the ones paying the bills, I suppose. Wrong approach to things IMO, but whatcha gonna do.
  6. They're two different expressions of the same thing. The latter takes aspect and FoV-Y. The former takes the dimensions of the near plane. You can derive these quantities from each other with some simple trig.
  7. 3D Using Sketchup as an architectural tool?

    Moving to Visual Arts. I've seen a lot of game designers use SketchUp to do rough level layout work, since it's much faster than any conventional modeler. But everyone goes back and swaps the SketchUp outputs with real models later. It's right there in the name - sketch. Use it to get the overall shape of things, don't rely on it to do all the detail work.
  8. No, that's pretty much the standard way to rate-limit anything. You can store it as "time left" (relative) or "time the command becomes available" (absolute) but that's more a preference thing. Just don't mix the two, that gets confusing fast.
  9. Not a suggestion - the thread is about riders, which are (potentially contractual) demands. That's pretty dramatic, if you ask me. It's one thing to say "hey, this worked really well with an sm57 in the past, let's do that again" versus "I require you to use an sm57 as that's the only way I sound like me". The former is sensible, the latter is not. I get that coming from the dialogue supervisor, who is presumably the representative of whoever is paying the engineer. (Although it's the type of micro-managing that destroys projects, frankly.) But the actor? They're not the customer, they're not the engineer, they're not there to make demands of the recording chain. I'm sorry but I just don't see why talent would have any standing to request a specific microphone. And if we're talking about somebody having an issue because there's not a U87 on site? Now that is unprofessional.
  10. What happens if you apply a rotation of -1 degrees? Does it still disappear? If not, then where DOES it disappear?
  11. I wouldn't use the Zooms or other hand recorders for this - they're definitively biased towards stereo field recording, and I don't think foley is typically stereo in the first place. A shotgun is my first thought as well, but if you can get close to the source a cardioid condenser like the Shure above is probably a great choice.
  12. Er. It's extremely common to reamp guitars through signal chains other than the player's preferred amp/pedals/amp. More importantly, if a guitarist tried to demand that the sound engineer use an sm57 to mic the cab, the engineer would laugh in their face. Sure it's a common choice but there's a million other mics out there. Same goes for the example above of a vocalist demanding an sm58 or sm7b. Given that, I'm puzzled that people would let the actor dictate sound engineering choices. The mic is bad enough, but you're going to let your actors get involved in preamp selection? Most professional musicians aren't afforded that level of interference. Suggest ones that have or have not worked well for them in the past, sure. But if you're doing this for real, surely the sound engineer owns the chain, not the actor. Do what any real studio does - take some time to run tests with half a dozen different mics and however many preamps, bring the talent in to listen to the recording coming through the monitors*, and figure out what fits with what the actor and dialogue supervisor are trying to accomplish. * Ideally, don't let people know what mic or preamp they're listening to when comparing. If you can double blind it, even better. You are listening to recordings and tonality, not brand names and model numbers.
  13. Some of you may have noticed that there is a GDNet Discord Chat link in the upper right corner. GameDev has had real-time chat in many forms over many years, but historically the chat has been heavily if not exclusively biased towards programming conversations. I and the rest of the moderator/staff team would like to make it a more inviting place to all of the various disciplines of game development, and in recognition of that we've broken out the chat with a separate #arts channel for visual arts and game design. In light of that new space, I'd like to extend an invitation directly to the members in this forum to participate in the chatroom and provide feedback in how we can continue to support all of you at GDNet. Thank you! (Here's a copy of the instructions to join the chat.)
  14. Some of you may have noticed that there is a GDNet Discord Chat link in the upper right corner. GameDev has had real-time chat in many forms over many years, but historically the chat has been heavily if not exclusively biased towards programming conversations. I and the rest of the moderator/staff team would like to make it a more inviting place to all of the various disciplines of game development, and in recognition of that we've broken out the chat with a separate #arts channel for visual arts and design. In light of that new space, I'd like to extend an invitation directly to the members in this forum to participate in the chatroom and provide feedback in how we can continue to grow the artistic community at GDNet. Thank you! (Here's a copy of the instructions to join the chat.)
  15. OpenGL Using glTexImage3D() for Texture Arrays

    Just once. You're (optionally) uploading 3D image data to be used as an array of 2D textures (same difference, really). Depth should match the array size.