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ndssia

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  1. Hey burnt_casadilla,    Just a few things:   You shouldn't need alienCount or alienPos. Rather, you'll want to have a List<Alien> that stores its Position, so that it can Draw itself with only spriteBatch passed in as a parameter.   The reason for the error, is that you're actually calling Vector2.Add (which adds together 2 Vector2), since you're referring to the item in the List itself by specifying the index.
  2. I think it'd actually make the game really involving for the the first wave of players, since you'd really be making a great deal of difference with your actions.   However, as you've stated, most players will simply create alts for this purpose; perhaps if there was gradual diminishing returns on profession effectiveness vs. profession level, instead of a hard-cap, that could be discouraged.   Regarding factional warfare, the issue with that is the snowball effect; once a faction secures a high quality resource for any amount of time, it'll will become more and more difficult for anyone to kick them out, due to their superior equipment. This may even reach a stage where the other two/ten/fifty factions working together are unable to defeat that one faction, unless of course there was some sort of betrayal, or lack of scaling against player numbers.
  3. Yes - absolutely, which is often why we suggest C#/Python/Java as the usual language for beginners, since it's far more important to learn programming before learning the intricacies of each language.
  4. [quote name='6677' timestamp='1346860315' post='4976866'] C# is an excellent language. It would be nice to one day move onto C++ yes (although you should have console.h included with code blocks) but with the mono platform's popularity rising and the huge list of external .net libraries available I think we're approaching the point where you could launch a career in C# and never have to touch C++ (It is an aim for me to one day learn C anyway and then maybe C++). [/quote] Hmm, saying you'd like to move onto C++ is similar to a tradesman saying he's moving on from bandsaws into circular saws. Programming languages are things you add onto your toolbelt, there is little to no "progression" between languages in the traditional sense.
  5. In case this was of interest to anyone except me: There's a new web-framework some of you have likely heard of, known as [url="http://meteor.com/"]Meteor[/url]; a JS web platform that's recently had $11 million injected by various VCs. Three key features struck me as particularly interesting from a games programming perspective:[list] [*]Live page updates - This means client/server synchronisation is already done for you; there's actually an example of a chat room application done in less than a few hundred lines. [*]Latency compensation - Fantastic, so we are going to be able to give a reasonable user experience for the player. [*]Clean, powerful data synchronization - All the back-end messaging is hidden from us, we just write in what we want to update. [/list] I decided to write a Graphical MUD using this web platform, and in less than 100(!) lines, you have zombies scrolling down the screen: http://fasterthoughts.net:8080/ Not particularly impressive; hell, you can bust up my server with Web Console commands if you really wanted to, since there's no security implemented in MeteorJS (that's what the millions are going towards). What you won't be able to see, is that the scrolling zombies are in the same position for every client; it's a persistent world with a snap of your fingers. Load a map in with XML/JSON, finish the player functionality, and you have a GMUD at the snap of your fingers; there's barely any boilerplate code required. Please let me know if you're giving this a shot - Nick
  6. What do you want to know about writing a Games Design Document? There's plenty of free articles regarding that on the web, as well as things like the Doom Bible.
  7. Be careful what you put inside a draw/render loop; as stated above, you shouldn't be loading images in there. Furthermode, it appears it can't find MainMenu.png, and throws an Exception, which leads to the top-level SlickException; that's your issue.
  8. return myLoader should be outside that IF I think; and it looks like the [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern"]Singleton[/url] pattern. It does work, but can cause complications in testing and multithreading in some cases.
  9. Hey, Amazon EC2 is available in Singapore and Tokyo.
  10. Very little of your work would be reusable for PS3. I wouldn't worry about that just yet though, Cell programming is not recommended for beginning programmers.
  11. Woops, If your MainForm is also the form that contains your GameElements, you can either pass through a reference to that form to CreateForm, and call it as a non-static method there, or you can make MainForm a singleton, and call it that way. Creating a seperate form for your game is better however, and you could do something like: // CreateForm.cs Game.NewGame(options); // Game.cs public static void NewGame(Options options) { var gameForm = new GameForm(); gameForm.Initialize(options); // Can't remember if you can have a custom constructor for forms... gameForm.Show(); }
  12. I'd go for either Tetris, or a Single-Player Text RPG; both will teach you a great deal about different things along the way.
  13. I believe you can actually use Platformer code to form the World Map part of your RPG; just turn off gravity, change the map, add a few extra animations (looking up/down), and voila Regarding the rest of your question, I personally believe C# and Java are the easiest for beginners to pick up; XNA 4.0 is a C# Framework, and is great for those just starting out; great debugging tools, and you aren't throwing things like memory management and pointers into the mix just yet. TiledLib by Nick Gravelyn, together with Tiled Map Editor will get you off to a roaring start in terms of building an RPG.
  14. If you're primarily a C# developer, you'll want to start with XNA; it's a simple, powerful framework, and it'll help you learn the most important skill in Games Design: Games Design.
  15. Depending on the complexity/amount of data you wish to send through, you can either do something like: [From CreateForm] MainForm.InitializeGame(String name, PlayerClass class, int difficultyLevel() { ... } Or you can pass through an entire data structure if you need to.