• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Tipsy

Members
  • Content count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

105 Neutral

About Tipsy

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Jaap85, AI is interesting to apply to [url="http://tophatsudoku.com/Botchee4x4.html"]http://tophatsudoku....Botchee4x4.html[/url] a baby botchee that I coded in VB. A fun exercise that has helped with Xtreme edition of which a teaser image is attached. Multi-player game program is a whole nother level that goes beyond my scant programming skill when it comes to web servers and such. It's still got aways to go but you can see/read static drafts of dynamic php pages at botcheecafe.org/Botchee.htm and the game is mostly functional. Soon the drafts will guide revisions to the main site which is linked from said url. 9x9 is the granddaddy game of botchee that can accommodate as many as nine players. Understanding symmetry will aid those that attempt to learn a winning strategy. Thanks for posting!
  2. I made meself on a simple 2D CAD program and did a cut n paste for my attached buddy Mr. Grid Bot. (we're both in sad shape) See [url="http://Botchee.com"]botchee.com[/url] and [url="http://tophatsudoku.com/botchee"]tophatsudoku.com/botchee[/url] for context (trying to fix it up). Have your tried xaml as part of Visual Studio? it's a free download from Microsoft. Trying to figure out how to twist rectangles for Xtreme gameboard.
  3. [quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1336165309' post='4937474'] Well, if you are thinking of something like two or more people playing scrabble or a CCG over a network, yes I'd consider that a browser-based game. If you are thinking of a single-player board, card, or dice game I'd collectively term those solitaires. Technically I guess they are turn-based strategy games, or some are more on the physics sim side, for example I know my friend's father is particularly fond of solitaire pool (billiards) games, and pinball would go in the same category. I didn't include them in the survey because typically these kinds of games are developed as physical board/card/dice games and only then ported to a computer format. Boardgamegeek is a great community for discussing this sort of design, if you're not already familiar with it. Not to exclude them or anything, they do fit in under gamedev's umbrella, just saying that if you don't find enough discussion of them here try there too. [/quote] Keen observations all ... Planning an initial run of about 500 boxed sets this year or next, At this point the website will be limited to robot play or between people using a common device. Going to hash out VB for Visual Studio but hire some help with xaml. Today I posted in another thread about Holey Hanna, which is a space type game where the planets get holes shot through them like swiss cheese and modeled on real world gravity. Think I'll start a new thread about how the happy people of Hanna are ruthlessly attacked by Jumpy Joe Schmo and his evil minions from the planets Holey Moley, Schmoley and Guacamole. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]
  4. [quote name='Waterlimon' timestamp='1336062396' post='4937136'] A game where you need to move the phone around a lot to make sure the player will seem like a total idiot if playing in public. [/quote] Holey Hanna is a possible name for a game that I thought of awhile back. Holey Hanna is a planet full of holes like swiss cheese. The interesting part is interacting with the gravity of such a world. For instance many people probably don't realize that there would be zero gravity at the center of a density consistent spherical planet. Tilting the phone could be your flight controls, but much of your acceleration is achieved by how well you navigate the gravitational field. A small solar system like ours where the planets are shot full of holes would really make for an interesting yet educational game. Anyone familiar with an existing game like this? A deposit of Plutonium, Gold or Lead would produce a large gravitational effect. Gravity is how real astronauts slingshot their spaceships to the moon and back. Tunnels through a planet would cause a natural oscillation like swinging on a swingset, so timing your rocket bursts (or gun fire = laws of momentum) would be key to saving fuel, etc. Lazers could cut holes with less impact on ones momentum. My programming experience is limited to scripting languages. Is there a good game engine that models gravity?
  5. Round and round we go on the great whirly gig in the sky ... Long ago in a land far far away sat a young guy who found himself in a very boring situation. Hour upon hour he stared at the o-silly-scope, not constantly, but thankfully only on carefully timed periodic occasion would a scan be initiated. Typically at each 90 second interval high voltage would energize an electron beam to engage a heavy chunk of W spinning at 10,000 RPM. Me thinks me middle initial is D as in Tipsy D. Botchee. D is for dummy, nope me and George share a common middle initial (in sound only). This Shirly is some sort of strange tale, but beats the heck out of me how in tar-nation to tell the tale to your liking. Well I'll dispel some of this cryptology so as to retain a semblance of sanity = D is for W ... Enough Diversion already, back to the spinning chunk of W. There is a high probability that you are in close proximity to some W right now. Shall I shed some light upon this subject? Illuminating your world is what W does best when the sun refuses to shine. The sun always shines, but when you're indoors or planet earth obscures then you are at the mercy of the artificial light sources that surround you. W standing for tungsten is about as silly as having Double-U as your middle name don't ya think? Me ears are threes and me hat is another piece of this sordid puzzle, and D standing for double-you seemed like as good of idea as any other. More D&W later we really must discuss something substantial. Games may seem at first to be a completely useless waste of time, and many times they are exactly that. Oh well, one mans trash is another mans treasure so I'll abstain from such talk, to each his own and all that yuck. Games can also challenge us in new ways, often times pitting us against one another as we rack our brains to string a strategic series of moves together whereas your opponents will strive in their own way to thwart your diabolical plan and steal the victory. Many games exist where ones skill is paramount, but few allow you to easily adjust the role luck plays to keep the game fun and unpredictable. Selective secrecy is how card games adjust the skill to luck mix, but then one must carefully guard ones hand (less fun) and be on the look-out for marked decks, etc. Backgammon is mostly skill with a little bit of luck, whereas Yahtzee is mostly luck. Botchee is based on Sudoku and Botchee Xtreme uses an unique gameboard of 24 tiles. Sorry for the crazy start, but W was one way to draw a parallel to lessons learned from previous exploits. TophatSudoku is to Botchee as a magic lamp is to an ornament. Tophat came about by brute force programming leading to careful selection of constraints; a term familiar to Sudoku aficionados. Botchee intends to bring a game to market that switches from slow and serious to fast and lively, simply by introducing optional dice and the melding of tiles. Botchee.com is currently being transfered to a new host where VS apps can thrive. Looking for help with Xtreme xaml, thinks I'll give vWorker another go and hash out the logic myself. http://www.tophatsudoku.com/botchee/ along with the index page at botchee.com will give you a pretty good idea and even get a little practice. The post description is my tagline for an exciting possibility that I'll post more about on a later gyration.
  6. [quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1335414643' post='4934964'] Probably I've forgotten something, ... What makes a game concept one you want to help bring to life? [/quote] Games like Backgammon, Scrabble or Yahtzee which depend on skill, but luck of the dice/draw impacts ones outcome as well. Aggravation/trouble/sorry type games also add an element of multi-player plotting, but have yet to come across games where the luck to skill dependence is easily varied. I've begun such a game and will post more as things progress. Browser games is the closest thing I could see on the list?
  7. 3s4 ears, heh heh
  8. 34 ears - heh heh
  9. No permission to do nothing?