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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

mame82

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  1. 1) OpenGL ES isn't double buffered by default, but GLSurfaceView uses double buffering in your configutration (eglSwapBuffer is called automatically). you can change this behaviour if you call setRenderMode(RENDERMODE_WHEN_DIRTY), now you can force swapbuffer yourself by calling requestRender() (Look at GLSurfaceView on the reference page) Tripple Buffering is also possible, look for the video about OpenGL developing from the last google IO. The guy explains how to use triple buffering for benchmarking purposes (with double buffering most devices have a fixed output of 30 / 60 fps) 2) The renderer is indeed on its own thread, GLSurfaceView starts the Thread after setRenderer() get's called. I've rewritten this class for Wallpaper-rendering with OpenGL ES 2.0 and took a deeper look. GLSurfaceView does all the EGL things with the more complicated android stuff for your, handling the RenderThread, Managnig the EGLContext (important because of the different behaviours on different devices, when other activities need a lock on the EGLContext - not trivial to manage this on your own) 3) I've choosen the way to build up two extra Threads for my current developments (one for logic, one for animations, several others are launched by android like SensorThread for polling accelerometer). In general I could say these things: - don't do heavy work on androids UIThread, which isn't the case if you do it in onDrawFram() because now its done by the renderThread - if you do heavy work like IO-operations use a ASyncTask - its hard to implement extra threads in the java manner (new Thread and calling run() ) because you have to take care of the whole synchronizing and more care on bringing your Threads to idle-state if your activity is paused (or you app is a battery drainer). This isn't the preferable way as long as you haven't performance problems while using the render-thread Avoid using native code, except you have to (ready c / c++ implemantations) - the dalvik vm is really fast, especially since it uses a JIT-Compiler (since API-Level 8 I think). You still have to call your c/c++ written wrapper methods through JAVA (with JNI / NDK), nothing else the Android-API is doing So you don't have a performance increase, except your logic is handled here and you make use of special ARM CPU features like the NEON-platform or similar things Look a christmas 3D on android market, if your device can handle it you'll see 2 things first: all resource are loaded in the render-thread, not with a async task (very long load time, user can't see anything) second: camera handling, matrix operations, particle calculation are also handled in the render task, but with less performance penalty than thread handling --> the need of an extra thread depends on what logic work you have to do