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altunsercan

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  1. Hello everyone. I am originally a game programmer, but i need to write story and dialogs for my next project. I am currently using Evernote/Google Drive to collaborate and share scenes, dialogs, character profiles with my team members. However i don't think i am following an useful format and things get hard to follow. Can you guys recommend any format/templates/tools for game story writing? Thanks
  2. Now that you mention Monomyth i remember an old idea of mine. To break mundaneness, we can have a hidden parameter with value increasing overtime that effects random encounter formulas increasing their probability. If a player keeps chopping wood that value increases chance of a bandit raid to his little town. When player completes the encounter he id given a choice to return his chores and reduce that value or pursue a new adventure and increase the value for greater encounters and rewards. But lets not drift away from the main topic. I agree this is a good topic. Lots of good ideas...
  3. Well questing/adventuring is a broad definition. While it mostly refers to get quest, do task, get back for reward type of structure, i also consider rescuing random prisoner from imperials, or chopping wood in local lumberjack for money in Skyrim a quest. It is up to content designer to create these seamless experiences. Returning to using rules part of questing mechanic, you can think of a thieving role where you receive no quests but as you steal your thieving levels up you can now get access to quality fences informants etc. Or you can level up in Bandit role can hire shady characters as guards etc. If you can provide a system where resources for these roles do not deplete ( like fishing ) player can continue to steal or raid camps as long as he wants.
  4. This discussion has steered in a certain way so i don't know if what i am going to suggest will contradict with previous posts. When i read about classes and roles, i immediately thougth they would be connected to distinct game mechanics. You can leave robust class system with everything balanced out as part of combat system, and make roles part of other game mechanic. For example you can make use of roles as part of questing/adventuring in such way that roles unlock and level up via doing related quests. Passively effecting combat system with rewards, skill unlocks etc. Or use roles much like professions, a money making/item building mechanic.
  5. May be you can implement a synergy system where your friend's influence on faction standing is weighted by amount of "playing together". So you would be more synergized with friends you play with rather than people you just added as friends. "Playing together" can be defined very differently. Here are some metrics to calculate that:[list] [*]Being in the same guild. ( a small instant boost ) [*]Finishing a quest together [*]Finishing a raid together [*]Trading ( may be exploited so it should have a upper limit ) [*]Forum participation ? ( May be you can implement a system that is connected to community forums) [/list]
  6. Maybe if game incorporates some systems using the player names, players may digest the predefined name list concept easier. For example if you can trigger a quest reward if you have a "Barbaric Surname". Or if you can create lineages like guilds and carry some reputation with your surname. Of course if you are going to go with a predefined name list you will definitely need a Gamer ID
  7. [quote name='Legendre' timestamp='1337863794' post='4942879'] "Unextraordinary" bystanders are expandable, skillless, uninteresting. If one of this isn't true, than you're someone special. But if all of these are true, then...why would anyone want to play this character in a video game? [/quote] Should we define "Unextraordinary" like that? An avererage, normal man can be exciting to play in right setting and story. He will simply not be a badass knight shaking earth as he steps with a sword burning so hot you can build a vacation hotel next to it kind of guy. In new World of Darkness series you can play a mortal ( as opposed to Vampires, Werewolves, Mages in the series ) which is quite ordinary skillwise but in an unordinary situation ( horrors of the night ). It is enjoyable and i know people who prefer playing like that.
  8. Yeah sure, though simulating grand scale movements along with suggestion to watch civilizations rise and burn sort of brings time travelly stuff in mind. A god game would be nice but OP suggest travelling, plotting courses etc so i don't think that is what he plans to do. Would stepping backwards in time be so hard. It is essentially same simulation in backwards. There would be some time paradoxes to tackle of course. But i think we are both straying away from what he wants, since we are not sure what he wants to create. He mentioned crafting economy etc. Is this going to be a strategy game?
  9. [quote name='Stormynature' timestamp='1338216297' post='4944033'] [quote name='Heaven' timestamp='1338184978' post='4943903'] [quote name='Dark_Oppressor' timestamp='1338081655' post='4943601'] I'm playing around with a fairly simple 2D space game, in which you fly about controlling a single ship. There are stars, planets, etc. I definitely want planets to orbit nearby stars, but I'm trying to decide if larger objects such as the stars should move throughout the galaxy.[/quote] Heh. I just googled how long it would take our solar system to make 1 orbit around the Milky Way...approximately 225+ million years. That's 225,000,000. So say you modeled a solar system in-game. A solar system where for gameplay reasons the third planet from the system's star took 10 minutes to make one complete orbit. That would mean for this system to travel even 1 degrees around the galaxy's center would still take almost 12 years in realtime (keeping the times constant). For this star system to make one complete orbit around the galaxy would take over 4200 years. Realtime. If I did my math right. TLDR: No, larger objects such as stars should NOT move throughout the galaxy. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img] Of course you could use different time scales, again for gameplay purposes. Planets rotate around at "Solar System Speed" (e.g., 10 minutes for Earth) and Solar Systems rotate around faster (e.g., 1 hour for Sol System). I'd still go with fixed Galaxy Objects, rotating Solar System objects. That way your map of the galaxy would remain fixed as you explored it. It would add needless complexity IMHO to have to keep updating your galaxy map if you decided to rotate every star around the galaxy's center in realtime. Sounds really interesting. I've always wanted to do some kind of solar system game where the planets rotated around a star and you navigated your ship around. Take care and good luck! Keep us posted! [/quote] One supposes that if you combined a non-ftl drive with suspended animation you could develop a game that has the microtime environment of a day to day existance when dealing within a solar system and a macrotime environment when travelling to other stars. Creating a game that shows an evolution of not only the galaxy but also the civilisations within it might be interesting. Returning to a solar system containing a stone age society the first time you visited and is now an advanced spacefaring culture could put some original elements into a game. Imagine returning to the star of your origin to view it's death many many millenia later and imagine having to figure out where it has moved to in the meantime, all while still doing your normal trading, fighting etc. There are a number of metaphors that could be drawn giving strength to the idea. [/quote] A Doctor Who game
  10. Putting all the skepticism aside, as far as i know scientists don't mark 3d positions in x y z coordinates. They rather speak relating to bigger object in space as anchor to denote position. For a moons position it is relative to planet, for a planet it is related to star, for a star it is related to galaxy core etc. So if you want to plot courses between bookmarks all you need to do is think spatial position not as x y z but as x distance from y anchor on z angle. Stars' may change but relative position would still be there.
  11. World machine is a great program. But i think OP asks for an player editable terrain. Since you have already tried voxels most possible next step is to try marching cubes like Waterlimon suggests. Note: Shouldn't this post be on programming forums?
  12. If character going rigth to left moves backwards it may give player impression that he is rewinding the story. If you make all the game assets on the right to left moving player act like that i might give a good traveling to past impression. I don't know what kind of story are you trying to tell so i cannot give an input on that aspect ( If that is what you want )
  13. [quote name='sciencewarrior' timestamp='1337256363' post='4940913'] The second is that it may not fit the story at all. If you're a Pokemon Trainer, the you are a kid obsessed with these fantastical creatures, not a psychopath that will kill other kids and shopkeepers to steal their Pokemon and special items. If you're a paladin, then no, you can't kill that widow that asked you to find her only son, no matter how much her sobbing and pleading irritate you. [/quote] Also, players are don't always good roleplayers or know what they want to experience, how they want to experience. Some times it's okay to limit them to deliver better experience. As for breaking the immersion, maybe you should work something out for a way to keep key NPC's alive without butchering believability.
  14. I realy like Stroppy Katamari's inputs on the diffuculties on representation of information. I am not a detective story guy, so i don't know much of the inner workings of how a detective solves a problem. System should be exteded to tackle these problem. One thing comes to my mind is to use generic post-its to modify evidence properties. A portrait of suspect with quotes will be a raw evidence but you can put a "Lie" post-it to modify her statement and use that post-it as an intermediate for linking other evidence. So we can develop more complex hypothesis. It is also evident that there is a need for different methods of verifiying the hypothesis than a lab test. Tricks, survailance etc. All games can have walkthroughs its up to players. We can't do anything about it.
  15. [quote name='Stroppy Katamari' timestamp='1336859297' post='4939640'] how do you allow the player to demonstrate they have solved the case, without the game's UI narrowing down the possibilities and giving away information in advance? [/quote] May be you can implement a system that links evidences to each other in a way that it makes sense. Sort of like a web of conspiracy, on a wall full of photos, news paper articles that are linked with threads. Your player can go into roam to find these evidence, take photes etc. Then back at home he links not the evidence but specific properties of evidence to each other. For example, two evidences could be a boot found in crime scene and a photo of a farm. Boot has lots of properties: Torn, size 30, brown, traces of mud. Photo of the farm (provided that the farm is a known place) wheat farm, wet soil, red barn. Most of these properties would be irrelevant but player can link all of them if he wants. When he links two properties it would become a hypothesis. Player than can try prove or disprove his hypothesis, may be with new evidence. Player X may be a lab assistant by chance? She ( love interest? ) can test some of the hypothesis and verify them. Like when you link traces of mud with farm soil, she can say yes it is the same soil! Once you solve a good part of the puzzle you can move on to next chapter. Player can of course brute force the system. But if there are too many options the brute forcing would be to much effort than actually thinking, which is what we want player to do. Also player has to find the evidence first before brute forcing. Anyway that is what i came up with.