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Lama43

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  1. Hello, i'm currently developing a game and i'm basically done with the sprite art, however i have a big problem in that i can't draw clothes since i have 0 knowledge of shading and drawing in general (in short, i suck at drawing). The clothes would be side-view so it's a bit easier, but still, is there any good tutorial on how to draw clothes? Or perhaps some good tips on how to do it?
  2. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1350931697' post='4992850'] [quote name='Lama43' timestamp='1350931249' post='4992845'] 1. How do I handle taxes on the income I make? Do I have to pay them at all? 2. Do I have to pay taxes to the Italian government (I live in Italy) or the USA? 3. Is there any sort of basic copyright protection I can use for a start? 4. I've heard that I can protect my work just by writing something prohibiting the use of artwork and stuff, is that true? 5. I suppose that to use some copyrighted content (like a song) I need to have the written permittance of the author, but how is it regulated? [/quote] 1. If Italy has an income tax, then you have to pay tax on your income. Check with Italy's government website. 2. Italy. 3. Yes. Check with Italy's IP protection website. 4. Yes. Copyright is automatic. 5. It's regulated in two ways: (1) the owner of the IP you use without permission can take action against you, have the game removed, and sue you for damages; (2) the Google store might deny you permission to sell your game on their service if they believe you used someone's IP without permission. [/quote] Whoah, that was fast. Thanks, that sorted it out for me (finally)
  3. Hello, I am currently halfway done in making a game that I intend to release on the Android system, and I've got several questions for which I had no answer yet: -How do I handle taxes on the income I make? Do I have to pay them at all? Do I have to pay taxes to the Italian government (I live in Italy) or the USA? -Is there any sort of basic copyright protection I can use for a start? I've heard that I can protect my work just by writing something prohibiting the use of artwork and stuff, is that true? -I suppose that to use some copyrighted content (like a song) I need to have the written permittance of the author, but how is it regulated?
  4. [quote name='samoth' timestamp='1350151688' post='4989840'] Well, can't you just take the points that you have and extrude them in pairs downwards to the bottom of the screen (pretty trivial, keep x coordinate and set y coordinate to 0), and draw a textured quad with those 4 points? Preferrably with a kind of "earth" texture, or with some brown-blackish Perlin noise. [/quote] Yes, that must be it. I was too bent on making it all a single texture for each section (which has 8 of these pieces). Thanks.
  5. [quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1350137898' post='4989773'] I'm really not following your opening post, could you please clarify? I have the following questions: a) So I assume it's a 2D terrain, but what sort? b) What do you mean "it just chooses between different directions of the terrain within a range (horizontal, vertical and so on)"? Is it a tile-based terrain and it chooses N, S ,E or W facing tiles accordingly? c) What do you mean by "making the terrain stay in bounds"? d) What is the idea of this "simple layer system" and what do you mean by "overlaps"? Overlapping tiles? e) Where do these hole artefacts appear and why? [/quote] -Yes, it's a 2D terrain in a side scrolling game, sort of what's in Terraria. -No, basically the system decides what's going to be the direction of the terrain, it can be a vertical cliff, a horizontal plain or the side of a hill. -Avoid the generic terrain texture go above the texture of the generated terrain -Layer hierarchy, for example one in which the sky is at the background, the generic terrain is one level up, and the generated terrain is on the top of both layers. Just to clarify, i refer as generic terrain to the filler between the generated terrain the character is actually going to move on, and the bottom of the screen.
  6. Hello, i'm currently developing a game (obviously) which has random terrain generation based on Box2D's ChainShape. Pretty much it just chooses between different directions of the terrain within a range (horizontal, vertical and so on). My problem is that given the random nature of the ground i can't think of ways to make it stay within the terrain "bounds", a simple layer system with overlaps and the like wouldn't work, and i'm not really an expert programmer. I'm using OpenGL ES if it is of any help.
  7. [quote name='Inferiarum' timestamp='1345331349' post='4970945'] for the narrow phase [url="http://www.wildbunny.co.uk/blog/2011/04/20/collision-detection-for-dummies/"]http://www.wildbunny...on-for-dummies/[/url] could be useful For broad phase i guess a grid is a good idea in most 2D games [/quote] Thanks, that's exactly what i need. @David.M: Thanks for replying too, but that's for common horizontal rectangles, and i need something more complex than that.
  8. [quote name='David.M' timestamp='1345306774' post='4970855'] I would use two triangles that compose a box for collision detection. You can just apply a rotation matrix to rotate the vertices of the triangles when your object rotates. [/quote] I probably expressed it badly, but my problem is not how to make the box, but rather how to detect collision with other boxes.
  9. Hello, i am currently developing a game in which the player runs indefinitely and can jump to fairly great heights (but not infinite, obviously). My problem is that i am lost at how to handle the whole collision thingy. In my design any object can have any rotation, as such i need to have a sort of collision box that can rotate along with the objects. I've tried to develop something but my knowledge of physics is very limited (i'm still pretty young and school didn't teach me a lot yet) and here i am asking for help. So, i have a problem with the narrow phase detection, but i'm not even sure on what to do in the broad phase. I tried to implement a recycling cell system but i've got the feeling it's going to be very cumbersome and slow, and since i'm developing on Android i need the maximum efficiency. My question is, how can i handle rotated collision boxes? And what system should i use to partition my world?
  10. Hello guys, i'm currently trying to learn programming on Android with pretty low success. The main thing is that there are few active forums where i can ask basic questions about particular methods and whatnot and this seems to be the best. So, regarding the questions, for now i have these: -What is an intent? What's its function? -Is there an callback that registers a touch event on the whole screen and not just a particular view? Meaning that it would return the general coordinates of the touch relative to the whole screen. -To make a 2D scrolling game like Sonic, do i need to use OpenGL or something? The View class seems to be pretty limited on this point.
  11. Hmm, i read that article and probably it's better if i learn C# instead. I've never particularly liked the way C++ is scripted either. From what i know C# is much more similar to Squirrel than C++ and also as i understand XNA is a great way of starting up. Thanks for the advices guys, now i know where to begin programming at least.
  12. [quote name='Sh@dowm@ncer' timestamp='1337425686' post='4941401'] Since you did some programming already even if it was just some scripting. I recommend you skip things like game maker and rpgmaker or similar. I think you are ready to learn a language. You have 2 choises: -Game oriented language -General purpose language If you choose first you can easily dive in game development. They are usually easy to learn and to use. Also they have everything you need to make simple/comlex games. But they do lack in performance and some advanced tehniques such as good 3d graphics,portability,third party libraries,ussualy have poor multhithreading support or don't have it at all. All in all when you mature past good 2d games you will simply want to skip this one. It is the best for learning but sooner or later you will leave it behind. If you choose a general purpose language it wont be so easy. Main reason is that you have to learn the language first before even attempting to make a game.Even WHEN you learn it you usually have to choose and learn a game library/engine to use in making your game. There is a lot of work to do just to get anything started. However when you DO learn all those things and learn it well. You will find yourself capable of using amazingly powerfull tools and you will have great freedom on what you can do with your game. They give the best control to you on what you want to make the downside is usually YOU have to make it. The choise is yours. I will give you some examples of general purpose languages: C - great starter. Everything you learn will be useful when advancing to the next step. (see below) C++ - Industry standard and with good reason. Very powerful,fast,full of features. Amazingly well supported,BIG communities,Countless tutorials,books,A lot of third party useful libraries,etc.. Downside IT IS ARGUABLY THE HARDEST THING TO LEARN (to a professional level) but worth it. C# - Great one. Somewhat easy to learn. Very nice standard library,Very nice modern features,reasonably fast well supported and somewhat elegant to some people. Java - Also a great one. Very feature rich standard library. Easy to learn and use. Runs on a lot of hardware. Great for mobile development and/or web development. its on;y somewhat good for 3d though. A good example would be Minecraft (it was done in Java) Python,Fortran,Delphi(free pascal),... List goes on and on... [/quote] Thank you for your answer, I suppose i'll stick to C++. Is there any good guide for it that you recommend to me? Also, is there any uncompiled game code that allows me to analyze the structure, libraries and so on? I find that the best way to understand a language is to analyze, experiment with it, coupled with a good manual of course [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]
  13. Hello, first post here. Let me introduce myself, I'm a 15 years old teen who lives in Italy and has the ambition to make a game. Now, i know that i need to use a programming language, but I'm not sure at all which one. I've had some experience with Squirrel and Pawn mainly in scripting for SA-MP and IV-MP, from which i believe i learned a lot. I developed a few complex functions and also made a small programme that would tell me the number of multiplies needed to reach a certain number with exponential growth ran by the server, but that was pretty easy. In any case, that was about 2 years ago but now I'd like to start programming again, I've already got a few ideas for games but I simply don't know where to start. My objective is a common 3D computer game, maybe with online support, but I understand that i need to have some experience in 2D game development first. So, some bullet points to make answering to me easier: -What language suits my needs best? -What do I need to make the graphics part of the game? -Is there any good tutorial that gives info on every step of game development? I hope this is a friendly community, I'm just a wandering soul wishing to find my path