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Cham

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  1. Thank you for your encouragement Lance42, I'm a new designer and I've been in the discouraged category for a long time. This brought me some new insight, thank you.
  2. [quote name='Cagnazzo' timestamp='1339045408' post='4946951'] I have a suggestion in a bit of a different vein. Well, actually it looks like the same vein as Serapth, but I'm going to reemphasize and expand on it. You mention you started with batch scripting and have used various other languages. Also, you say you're 15 - am I correct in inferring that you've never taken a formal class in computer science? There's no shame in that, but it does mean that there's something you have to be aware of. Learning a language isn't really what you need to do. It's likely that your knowledge of programming is all imperative. Again, there's no shame in that, but it means that if you jump headfirst into making a game, or even learning a language, you're going to be getting a bunch of information that you won't know what to do with. I tried to learn C++ before studying computer science, and I thought I knew what I was doing; I was, however, sorely mistaken. Not only did I not know what I was doing, I didn't know that I didn't know what I was doing. There's an entire, rich, important world of computer science out there, of paradigms from declarative to functional to object-oriented, and until you wade into it, you probably won't truly understand what you're doing, and more importantly, why you're doing it. It can be extremely frustrating both because bugs will pop up that you don't understand and because your design will be, in a word, poor. At least, that's what I experienced, and it was very disheartening. To that end, I'd recommend picking up and going through introductions to computer science. I actually have something that might be perfect for you - check out [url="http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-00-introduction-to-computer-science-and-programming-fall-2008/"]this[/url]. It's an introduction to computer science done by MIT - it requires little in the way of prerequisites, and teaches important, foundational techniques in CS. Things like debugging, container types, basic algorithms, and recursion. Best of all, it uses Python as its main language - if you do the problem sets, by the end you'll be filling out a skeletal program to model virus populations within an organism. It only takes a few weeks if you study hard every day. Though I haven't done it myself, there's also [url="http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-00sc-introduction-to-computer-science-and-programming-spring-2011/"]this[/url], which is the same course but designed for learners over the internet. Remember, you'll be learning Python this way - but rather than the shallow understanding you'd get from just skimming documents and tutorials, you'll get a rich understanding that you'll be able to apply to other languages and problem areas. That all may seem harsh, but I see myself about ten months ago in your posts. I had brief experiences with languages and thought I knew enough to get started making a game. All I did was throw together code so poorly that I got frustrated and gave up. I spent the next several months learning everything I could from MIT's courses and various forums. I'm far from an expert - I've only actually finished about three of the introductory courses, and my own game project is basically only at the point where I have colliding blocks on the screen. But I do know that if I hadn't gone through those courses, my code base would be a mess and I probably would have given up on programming entirely. Though my code is still terrible, it's leagues ahead of what it was, and uses many important concepts, like abstraction barriers and data hiding, that I didn't even know existed before. It's a long road, but ultimately it's one of the few that will get you where you want to be. I wish you the best of luck. [/quote] You put a lot of effort into that post, I realize everything a lot more clearly now. I will go through these Lectures, they look very interesting! Thanks again!
  3. [quote name='nooblet' timestamp='1338925416' post='4946556'] Honestly, if you found C# too difficult, I wouldn't even consider picking up C++ as your first language. C# is one of the easiest languages to learn from my experience, and combined with XNA, you can witness very fast results. You seem incredibly indecisive, and you're trying to take everybody's advice, which is influencing the way you think, as well as hinders your own learning experience. There's no "best" starter language, nor are you going to be a better developer by picking up a "more powerful language" as your starter. When you actually start to learn a language, and become more proficient as a programmer, then you can pick up other programming languages with ease. You have decided to stick with Python, which is a highly recommended language to start out with on these forums, and around the web. I would discontinue searching these forums for advice on starter languages, ignore everybody's input from now, and just [b]program[/b]. Make games, make applications, make sexy time, just [i]start[/i] learning and [i]stop [/i] thinking about it! [/quote] Thank you for bringing a whole new field of insight. I am going to work with Python.
  4. [b]Fine, I have decided to use Python.[/b] What should I use to learn? I will stay with it, I already know the basics of Python. I would like to take this moment to thank all of you for your insight on my situation and information/opinions on certain languages. It really got me thinking, I think I'm ready to start!
  5. If I see one good 2D game (platformer) made in Python, my mind will be set. C# is my other choice if I decide to not take Python.
  6. [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1338854271' post='4946267'] [quote name='Cham' timestamp='1338851825' post='4946258'] [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1338849981' post='4946249'] [quote name='Cham' timestamp='1338848284' post='4946241'] I am planning to make a game similar to terraria. I haven't seen a game made in Python that comes close to the quality of Terraria. Also, windows users will have to install Python in order to play my game, which doesn't seem very effecient. With C# and XNA you don't need to do any of that. Im just saying. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/sad.png[/img] [/quote] First off, you can bundle a Python game into a single executable. Second, with C#/XNA, you still have dependencies. That said, you are putting the horse way before the cart, you need to learn programming first. The guy behind Terraria probably spent years learning to program before creating that game, which I imagine took a number more years to create. [/quote] Wait so you can bundle Python applications into one .exe and have it run even though the user does not have Python? I looked at the best games made in Python, they are not very professional. All the 2D games are choppy, and 3D games aren't very high quality. [/quote] Then you [url="http://www.eveonline.com/"]did not[/url] look at the [url="http://www.panda3d.org/"]best games[/url]. And yes, you can. [/quote] The best 2D games, I'm not a big fan of 3D Games. If I were to build a 2D game, I should be using PyGame right?
  7. [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1338849981' post='4946249'] [quote name='Cham' timestamp='1338848284' post='4946241'] I am planning to make a game similar to terraria. I haven't seen a game made in Python that comes close to the quality of Terraria. Also, windows users will have to install Python in order to play my game, which doesn't seem very effecient. With C# and XNA you don't need to do any of that. Im just saying. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/sad.png[/img] [/quote] First off, you can bundle a Python game into a single executable. Second, with C#/XNA, you still have dependencies. That said, you are putting the horse way before the cart, you need to learn programming first. The guy behind Terraria probably spent years learning to program before creating that game, which I imagine took a number more years to create. [/quote] Wait so you can bundle Python applications into one .exe and have it run even though the user does not have Python? I looked at the best games made in Python, they are not very professional. All the 2D games are choppy, and 3D games aren't very high quality.
  8. I am planning to make a game similar to terraria. I haven't seen a game made in Python that comes close to the quality of Terraria. Also, windows users will have to install Python in order to play my game, which doesn't seem very effecient. With C# and XNA you don't need to do any of that. Im just saying. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/sad.png[/img] I honestly think I should take C++, I might be able to handle it if I try hard enough. I know this is making a lot of you mad, but I know I'm setting myself up for failure by choosing the wrong language. I want to learn one, very good, language.
  9. I think I've been relying on the opinions of others as my own. One person says something good about the language, the other person says something bad. I take those opinions as my own, which I shouldn't. But now you have all reassured me that Python is the language to go with, I am greatful.Thank you all for your advice! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.png[/img]
  10. [quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1338762310' post='4945934'] Lmao, then go with python. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Go very slow through it and for the love of everything, READ. Too many people just go in and look at the code and what certain things mean and continue on. You're learning now, which means everything you learn now will make the way for the future. [/quote] If I were to create a 2d small rpg, would python do the job? Is there any visual engine I can use (for c# or python)?
  11. Oh my good god, I just spent a lot of time on C# but it seems like the wrong choice! I've seen a tutorial on how to make a 2d game in C# it looks way over my head. Python would be easier, but I just can't choose! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/angry.png[/img] Java is support by a lot but it seems just as difficult as C#. C++ is just obviously way over my capability. I feel like quitting, this is so hard to choose.
  12. [quote name='a_insomniac' timestamp='1338679989' post='4945684'] [b]@OP:[/b] The information you provided in your original post suggests that the reasons you have forgotten the basics is two-fold: [i]attempting to learn multiple languages, moving ahead to advanced areas when you were not ready[/i]. Again, only having limiting information, it sounds like you bounced in-between strong and weakly typed languages – if true, this would confuse anyone just starting out. My advice, pick one language, any language, and code in it until you become adequately functional. However, be forewarned, a majority of the community is against learning C/C++ as a first language. Personally, I believe everyman chooses his own sword, it is only until you taken to the battlefield when you know if you have chosen wisely – practice makes perfect. That said, regardless of either strongly or weakly typed languages, a large majority are derivatives of C. Developing a strong grasp of C/C++ will allow you to later on code in a number of languages, effectively, within a few hours - API docs by your side [assumed basics are understood]. Nonetheless, “your” focus should definitely be that of developing a true understanding of the basics of programming. Truthfully, your notes on this topic will not help you as much as you think, you are already being taught the basics in a book – suggesting that the basics are learned as a result of doing. These foundational concepts will be honed by “you” as you continuously write-code, and more code, and more code, until the [b]basics [/b]are perfunctory - this is one area where learning by rote is helpful. So what are the basics? [size=2][i]I am sure this list would/will vary per individual:[/i][/size] [b][Written in no specific order][/b][list] [*]Program Structure / Functions [*]Variable Declaration [*]Arrays [*]Boolean / Comparison Operators [*]Conditional Statements [*]Iterative Constructs [/list] -- Furthermore, I am not suggesting that you do not take notes – must of us do. Although, as you gain more coding experience, your notes will be more about “software engineering” and any language specific notes would/should consist of language differences i.e., memory allocation/dealloation specifics, class specifics, OOP uses (inheritance vs. interfaces, etc). Anyway, the sooner you master one language, the better off you will be - learn another language only if you absolutely have to, or if curiosity is making you unproductive [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/dry.png[/img] Eventually, you just may learn to master the implementation of design patterns, turning you into a more effective scientist, not coder – when this happens, your notes will be worth gold. Good luck to you Sir and as always, have fun. [/quote] Woah, thank you for the time you put into your posts, I'm just extremely worried if I cannot handle the curret language I am learning (C#) so I am thinking of moving into Python instead. But I will take your well thought out advice, and stick with C# until I get good with it! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]
  13. [quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1338666533' post='4945646'] OneNote is a freaking amazing piece of software. Not free though, but amazing, I use if for a ton of things. [/quote] I just realized I have it from the Microsoft Office 2007 Suite!
  14. [quote name='kbenderoth89' timestamp='1338666658' post='4945647'] Typically I just type comments in the programs when learning. Like, when I learned about the data structures like lists and trees in C++, i wrote C++ style comments about each function and step. I know that every language has a way you can insert comments in your code. I'd suggest just that [/quote] I've never thought of that, but wouldn't you have to locate the file with the comments on that specific function? It would be very unorganized, that is my only worry.
  15. [b]Hello GameDev Community,[/b] While I was learning the basics of multiple programming languages, I did not take notes. While I moved on into the more advanced tutorials, I lost my knowledge on the basics, it is frustrating. I have come up with the conclusion that I will takes notes. This is where I need the advice of you experienced coders. I have downloaded EverNote to take notes on my computer. It is still kind of hard to remember although I now have a reference. So my question is this. [b]Is it better to take notes on your computer or write it down in a notebook?[/b] It takes longer writing notes in a book, especially the code examples but it a lot easier to remember than when you type the notes. If you have methods of taking notes that are different, feel free to share them. Thank you for your time, [b]-Cham[/b]