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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

viriesque

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  1. [quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1339101762' post='4947182'] Personally I prefer roleplaying communities where there are a variety of worlds to play within at any given time. I mean, some days you wanna be a dragon, other days you wanna be a spaceship pilot, other days you wanna be a tribal warrior, right? And some people like a more cheerful world, while others like a more gritty one. [/quote] There are lots of post-by-play forums that span genres, universes, fanfic-doms and such already. I think my desire is to weave one tale with many stories centered in it. To make real world that can stand up on its own, alongside other players and writers. I have different things I want to do on a day by day basis as well, but (to me) that is what my bookmark bar is for [quote name='Stormynature' timestamp='1339099454' post='4947172'] You might look at it from the perspective of a team of writers as used in television shows etc. An overarching set of guidelines for development are established and then individual episodes are farmed out to individual writers (or smaller teams within the larger team) to bring out about the required guideline's immediate needs as well as create their own story within that "universe". [/quote] That strikes a chord with the feeling I get when I think about this project ^^ Perhaps it's just a matter of finding the right writers.
  2. I ran a roleplaying board with a small team of administrators for five years. It was good fun, but after a while, story lines become recycled if you don't have a moderation team that is dedicated to throwing prompts out to people and such. I'd never considered the idea of a matchmaking system before -- though I do really want to make good use of user profiles so that they're actually used for current In-Character information and not as an afterthought. I've got the premise and name of this open world already hashed out and reserved, as it were...Ideally, main draw to this 'game' would be interacting with the world, though a gallery and commission area would be very helpful! Maybe some things I've previously written will help better communicate what I'd like this thing to offer: [quote][b]Social Roleplay[/b] The Play that many RP sites offer is highly social and focused on relationships. Etherwyrld is no different, in that relationships are vital to the life of the board. [b]Progressive Roleplay[/b] This element of Play separates Etherwyrld from some other boards because the character you create can indeed grow and become stronger than they were when they started. This is usually achieved through quests and threads similar to them. [i]Character Progression:[/i] An individualistic level of progression that allows for different characters to grow themselves via skills, (levels) and the sort. [i]Plot Progression:[/i] An individual/group level of progression that explores differing plotlines. This can be thought of much like a scavanger hunt or an easter egg hunt. During a plot, more information about the Wyrld will be revealed. [i]Board Progression:[/i] As different plots progress, the board itself will change. Board-wide changes entail moving forward in the Wyrld's history and watching how things have progressed. Board-wide changes (called Chapters) will only happen once all the plots for that 'time period' have been exhausted. [b]IRC Events[/b] The Wyrld can also be accessed over Internet Relay Chat as well as on the forums! We host certain real-time RP events for the whole community. It is always open for members who want RP in a semi-free-form and quick way. Chat logs are usually cleaned and posted to the forums after a scene or a plot has finished.[/quote] I'm not even sure this is viable to maintain as a writer -- to guide a collaborative plot line that spans an entire world or even how to really manage it. I think that is where I keep getting snagged. What does guiding a collaborative plot look like? Maybe the key really is in pen-and-paper table top GMing.
  3. I don't actually want to make a table-top RPG xD (Though I will definitely look over those sites.) It's more that I want to make an interactive RPG community that mixes text, artwork and roleplaying in an open world to make a story in which players actions make a difference in the long-term story of this world Akin to what Elder Scrolls MMO is doing with some of their ideas on questing and such...but in a completely different setting with completely different lore (and absolutely no big budget).
  4. [b]Preface:[/b] Back before consoles and computers, there were games. I'm sure plenty of us have made character sheets and played Dungeons & Dragons, where imagination and interaction with others are keys to making the game a fun experience. Even after computers became household objects, imagination was important -- in games like Zork, or other text-only adventures, writing was all the user had to interact with. Now, I'm not suggesting that everything should be text-only. So don't jump to any conclusions -- just setting up the point. Something I've wanted to do for a long time, now, is make a community for role-playing that employs a sort of 'prompt-and-response' and 'simplified rulebook/character sheet' formula for users to interact with an open world. I believe that concept art is helpful in setting a tone for how this world looks and feels, but for the most part, text only would be used. There would need to be a world-wide story arc, regional story arcs, and then more specific arcs to have outlined out...but that's not what would make this fun and unique. The point would be to create an open world that players could actively make an impact on. A game in which someone's character would not only be someone of their own design, but would be able to truly rise from a nobody to the leader of an entire nation. [b]The Topic:[/b] To make something like this a reality, some sort of sustainable system would need to be in place. How would such a thing become long term? How would users be able to become active and important in how this world grows and develops? Would this thing really need to be a text-only venture? I've got some ideas of my own, but as this would be an RPG, I can think of no better place to ask for input than game-writers! Though...maybe this thread is better placed in the Game Design forum...?
  5. Stormy - Thanks for the insight I'll lurk about there and see if I can't help to melt the glacier a bit~ Tom - I've been reading through them and will continue to do so
  6. It seems that a flowchart would be a good way to organize this information and begin to develop the ideas you have. Starting at the beginning, actually go through the key decision points you have built up in your head. My advice would be not to even worry about this being a game series and instead, focus on the story itself. Once the key decisions have been plotted out, you can begin to chart out the other decisions that lead up to the big ones.
  7. Thanks for the information, Tom! (That puts me more at ease.) I wasn't really sure where to put this thread, so thanks for giving me more of an idea on what 'For Beginners' and 'Breaking In' are actually for Honestly, I was just wanting to get some feedback from folks who are already making games to get a sense of how someone with my skill set would be used in a team so that I can really make my portfolio and resume communicate what I can do. As I have experience with both art direction and plot/dialogue/lore writing, it feels like I've got a very not-advertised skill set. Not really sure how to show what it is I can offer. However, as a creative thinker, I'm sure I can keep working some ideas out and hope that generous souls ahead of me will give me some feedback, now and again. [I think I should also mention that I don't have any interest in getting a job with some big developer. Ideally, I'd like to just make games with people who just want to make games in a team where we all compliment one another's strengths and weaknesses. This is NOT an advertisement for myself. I just wanted to make my stance clear so there's no confusion.]
  8. Oh, I didn't imagine anyone would much care to work on MY ideas. At least, not without having something invested in them. It's just that storytelling is what I'm good at. I'd love to help other flesh out their own stories and ideas. I've been writing for over ten years, now...but I suppose the proof is in the pudding, right? Perhaps the best way to show I'm able to tell a story is to have samples for others to read? Though, reading a novella or a selected few short stories and playing a game are two very different types of interacting with fiction... And I thank you for your advice, Radikalizm, you've confirmed suspicions I've had for quite some time. It seems a little sad, though, having to force yourself to learn how to program a game when you've no talent for it, especially since whatever I would be able to produce would likely seem lacking. Though, perhaps some sort of simple interactive novel would be enough...
  9. Obviously, I'm a beginner. I'm not a coder and I'm not a 3D model maker. I suppose I'm able to illustrate well enough, but there are lots of people out there who are far better. I'm really no good with composing music. As I join this forum and begin to browse around, I find that 'independent' games are much more literal than I'd imagined...it seems that there are a lot of people working on projects by themselves. Or, conversely, talented individuals are posting for paid work. This isn't a bad thing, but none-the-less, I'm feeling a little lost. I'm no one-woman show and I'm definitely not able to hire talent. I'm a lore weaver. A world builder...a writer. In college, I spent a lot of time with art direction and creating cohesion between different elements in a system. I know my strengths and weaknesses, and I know that both storytelling and art direction are important in game-making -- I'm just not entirely certain where I fit in. More than anything, I'd love to be a part of a team. I believe that a group of people are greater than the sum of their individual parts. A team of people who are passionate about making games and growing together as artists and developers. Is this the sort of place to find others of a like mind?