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Crovea

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  1. Thanks didn't realize it belonged there, i reposted now, assume thats alright!
  2. Hey! I'm in the process of creating a game engine (who isn't, amirite) for top-down sprite 2d games with alot of units. (such as moba's and RTS games, diablo and scbw was made this way more or less). So one of the last things i need in my physics subsystem/subengine is pathfinding, where i plan to use the A* algorithm which requires a grid(?). I plan on using a tilemap for static obstacles (some kind of map loaded from a picture, showing which parts of the map are walkable, possibly using a quadtree) And my already existing collision detection grid for semi dynamic obstacles (such as buildings, trees, craters, etc) As mentioned, I use a variable size grid for collision detection. I initialize the grid field size to a size that is atleast the size of the largest units collision box. [b]Q: Which leads me to my first question, wouldn't this kind of grid be too big to also use for pathfinding? (maps will be much larger than a screen) Q: Also with the size of the grid fields being variable from game to game, wouldn't that result in different and sometimes bad behavior?[/b] 1. Option would be to split the grid i already have into smaller fields. [b]Q: But with dynamic size grids, how would i go about partitioning it?[/b] Alternatively, if the existing grid isn't usable i see two other options: 2. Create a new grid for pathfinding with fields always of the same size. (a pretty decent chunk of memory would be required) 3. Try an approach where i dynamically build fields/nodes based on coordinates. The objects could be pulled from a pool to improve performance. [b]Q: Is option 2 actually feasable? or am i missing something essential from A* that makes it unreasonable. Q: Would option 1 actually be worthwhile despite the memory cost, due to being easier/simpler/faster?[/b] Any advice, tips or experiences are welcomed Posted Image
  3. Hey! I'm in the process of creating a game engine (who isn't, amirite) for top-down sprite 2d games with alot of units. (such as moba's and RTS games, diablo and scbw was made this way more or less). So one of the last things i need in my physics subsystem/subengine is pathfinding, where i plan to use the A* algorithm which requires a grid(?). I plan on using a tilemap for static obstacles (some kind of map loaded from a picture, showing which parts of the map are walkable, possibly using a quadtree) And my already existing collision detection grid for semi dynamic obstacles (such as buildings, trees, craters, etc) As mentioned, I use a variable size grid for collision detection. I initialize the grid field size to a size that is atleast the size of the largest units collision box. [b][i]Q: Which leads me to my first question, wouldn't this kind of grid be too big to also use for pathfinding? (maps will be much larger than a screen)[/i] [i]Q: Also with the size of the grid fields being variable from game to game, wouldn't that result in different and sometimes bad behavior?[/i][/b] 1. Option would be to split the grid i already have into smaller fields. [i][b]Q: But with dynamic size grids, how would i go about partitioning it?[/b][/i] Alternatively, if the existing grid isn't usable i see two other options: 2. Create a new grid for pathfinding with fields always of the same size. (a pretty decent chunk of memory would be required) 3. Try an approach where i dynamically build fields/nodes based on coordinates. The objects could be pulled from a pool to improve performance. [b][i]Q: Is option 2 actually feasable? or am i missing something essential from A* that makes it unreasonable.[/i][/b] [b][i]Q: Would option 1 actually be worthwhile despite the memory cost, due to being easier/simpler/faster? [/i][/b] Any advice, tips or experiences are welcomed [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
  4. [SOLVED] Turns out visual studio was importing the .cpp files from the library project! Even tho i had not made any sort of reference to it! wierd. By renaming the cpp file in the library, the project using the library simply acted as i suspected. Hey! im fairly new to c++, using visual c++ and i've encountered a small issue i'd like to have solved! I'm starting from scratch creating a 2d graphics library, i have successfully created a simple class with a simple function that throws an exception, in the library, exported it as a DLL and a .lib file that links the DLL ( that's how to do it right? ). I can use the library in a seperate project perfectly well, but when i call the function and the exception is correctly thrown, i can see the .cpp implementation file from my library, even though this is in a completely different project? I may be misunderstanding things a little bit, but isn't library implementations supposed to be hidden? and if thats not standard, how can i hide my implementation, since i don't want my users to go modifying the library directly. Thanks!
  5. Thanks alot, this works perfectly it seems! I copied it right from the formula i found: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6006400/modifying-the-angle-of-a-unit-vector Which is kinda strange i think? I guess that could have something to do with the y-axis being inverted or something I have no idea how i missed that the second line of code was using the first variable, which obviously causes errors xD
  6. Hey! I making a 2d top-down shooter game and i'm currently in the process of creating weapons. When a soldier fires a projectile, i find the unit vector between the soldiers center and mouse position ( the target ) and use that as a basis for the velocity vector for the projectile which works fine! But i've run into problems creating a shotgun, which is supposed to spray bullets. What i want to do here is spread 5 bullets out evenly in a 25 degree angle centered around the target vector. My vector math is a few too many years behind me but from what i've been able to find online, the formula i need and have been using is: [CODE] xVel = xVel * (float)cos(addingAngle) - yVel * (float)sin(addingAngle); yVel = yVel * (float)sin(addingAngle) + yVel * (float)cos(addingAngle); [/CODE] Where xVel and yVel is the coordinates of the unit vector i found between shooter and target. addingAngle is the angle im trying to add ( or substract by being negative). This is however, giving me some wierd results with bullets flying in irregulair angles. I'm probably mixing up radians and degrees, but that doesnt explain why my bullets appear to be choosing such apparently random angles (however conistent) So can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm going to have to read up on vectors eventually, but i'd rather wait until i have more time on my hands.
  7. EDIT: NEVERMIND!! It seems my compiler was hiding the fact that it had a problem with vector not being a member of std. Sorry [s]Hey i have a probably quick question. I declared a vector<Zombie*> in my class header, but when i try to access it, i get the error that it's unidentified? This wierds me out as my other variables are perfectly accessible. My class header: [CODE] class ZombieManager { public: int ZombieHP; int nOfZombies; std::vector<Zombie*> zombies; //array of zombies! } [/CODE][/s] [s]I in my ZombieManager.cpp [CODE] ZombieManager::ZombieManager(int initZombiesSize = 50) { int nOfZombies = 0; //Works perfectly well zombies.reserve(initZombiesSize); //error C2065 'zombies' : undeclared identifier zombies = new std::vector<Zombie*>; } [/CODE] Does anyone have an explanation/solution?[/s]
  8. Noted thanks
  9. Thanks alot, this seems to be what i need! On the subject of references, i don't really see a good reason to use them. (I prefer pointers, const pointers etc) But from what i've been able to read, thats a personal preference and i'm fairly experienced in C so. (C# also, so references aren't mysterious to me) Sometimes you NEED to use pointers, other times you CAN use references, so i'd rather make my code more uniform than gain a little safety and 'easy on the eyes notation'. Unless im missing something about references?
  10. Hey! My first post here so tell me if i'm doing something wrong I've started developing a game in C++. To begin with i just did some proof of concept with lots of (bad?) global variables. After cleaning up and attempting to exhibit better programming practises i have been moving my variables into my main function and passing them to parameters. This is from my understanding the way to go since you have control of what functions can modify what variables. The problem is that i'm passing way too many variables to functions that shouldnt need them. An example is an objects move() function, this move function checks for collisions, if there is a collision it calls a damage function which might cause the player to die and then call a GameOver() function which resets the game. The game over function needs to reset alot of variables which i as a (good?) c++ developer is passing to it as parameters, but those parameters come from the damage function which gets them from the move function. So when i call the move function in the main function, it basically needs pointers to all the variables in the game which seems really really silly! I can't possibly believe this is the way to go, but neither is global variables. So my question is if i should put these variables as static data members of a static class as a way to avoid global variables. But i've heard that this is just as bad as global variables as they suffer from the same problems (Who modified what?) I've tried to find some high quality open source games on here, but every post with that purpose just tells the OP to go and get his hands dirty himself. Any advice is appriciated! thanks! EDIT: tl;dr Should i use static members for game global variables, or if not, then what?