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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

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  1. Quadro is not needed unless you are an industry professional. The NVidia GTX series are consumer cards. The 660 is the current gen gaming model. There are also 670 and 680 models if you can afford it.
  2. Another alternative if your playing with python is to use pygame. Sure its alot slower than C#/XNA but its easy to use and still pretty capable. Your first game is never going to stick very well to the design doc so you could attempt to make your current game in pygame, see that it all goes horribly wrong and then with the knowledge you have gained attempt it again in C#/XNA.
  3. monogame has API functions for keyboard input, use them to check what key is pressed?
  4. silverlight is a long dead and unsupported framework btw. Also the only way to run C# in browser other than either using the Unity Web Player plugin or using chromes native client which requires more than C# knowledge (need a little experience with C/C++ in order to alter and compile to mono runtime for NaCl correctly)
  5. well you may have to change what libraries you use for various things, you'll need to see does the graphics library you use support android/have an android port available etc. Then you will need to rewrite your input handler for touch screens aswell, that said android already has support for hardware keyboards, mice and gamepads (did you know that ice cream sandwich actually has drivers for the wired xbox 360 controllers, just a case of connecting them which is also easily done). Theres some more that needs doing aswell but I'm not an android dev.
  6. https://devs.ouya.tv/developers Just click download ODK. Done. It is essentially android so its java again. Seeming as you can also use C++ on android I assume you can use C++ on the OUYA (Google the NDK). Its been said that unity will be supporting the OUYA (I assume its not really a drastic change from their existing android version). Monodroid should also work. They said themselves that actually all consoles will ultimately be dev consoles. Those who willingly paid 699 or above were paying for the first run consoles. As the first run was so small (about 1200 approx) they are going to cost alot more than mass produced consoles, plus your getting a clear plastic console unlike everyone else.
  7. I think one reason to write from scratch rather than an engine is also the flexibility of doing things EXACTLY how you want. It just comes at the cost of massively increased effort and difficulty which is fun in its own right for some.
  8. [quote name='MyNameIs' timestamp='1356277796' post='5013686'] Android runs on ARM right?  Pretty sure you might be able to use {this newish JIT compiler}. No clue, but if I'm not mistaken, and I probably am, what you're looking for is the ability to compile or interpret the language and libraries on a specific CPU type which is likely ARM, which probably supports openGL ES, and odds are your game supports regular openGL. Its potentially doable, as far as I can tell from my knowledge of how this stuff works.  Good luck. [/quote]That is just another python interpreter. Your kinda on the wrong track there. As it is the default python interpreter runs on arm already. What he is after is running his .py file within the actual android environment (which is actually available on mips and x86 aswell as arm). Its doable with SL4A but that isn't practical for end users, the only way I know of the actually get a python app on the play store or in a neat .apk file would involve a lot of kludging around with java and NDK and by the time its working you would have been better off writing your app in java in the first place.
  9. Android was meant to run on several different architectures seamlessly. It may well be most popular on arm but then you get the issue of ARMv6 and ARMv7 and then on ARMv6 in particular issues about whether or not the CPU has a hardware FPU or not. Then there are a few devices that run on MIPS rather than arm (particularly in china) and a few x86. I think that is the perfect time to be using a VM rather than native code, although it does seem that they give options for compiling separate binaries for each platform. Anyway, seems to be alot of useful insight on the subject in this thread.
  10. You would need to manually port the code to python 2.7. You cant put python games on the play store either, infact the end user would need to go through the process of installing python onto their device themselves and then manually loading their game into it. If you want to write an app on android then just use java, C or C++. Python on android seems to be more useful for light programming on the go (it makes an excellent calculator for example).
  11. Which version of windows phone are we talking? Because windows phone 7 only supports C# or VB.net with XNA. Windows phone 8 does allow native code with directX. As far as I know there are no libraries or engines with any support for windows phone 8 at this time.
  12. If your a C# developer carry on using C#. If your only concerned about windows the SharpDX is the tool of choice (directX for .net). Monogame is also excellent for cross platform but is a little higher level (somewhat like XNA just more upto date). OpenTK is another cross platform choice (OpenGL for .net/mono). As for art. That depends on if your going solo or part of a team. If your part of a team then it is easy enough to mock up artwork that will do temporarily until the actual artists have done their thing, even if a car ends up being a simple cube and your lovely brick wall is just a smooth orange surface. If your going solo then yeah, your going to need some good quality assets in order to get a half decent game.
  13. Well I started in python (without using its OOP features particular), then VB.net and C# which are of course OOP (and I do use OOP for my computer science coursework) but outside of school I've been playing with a little bit of plain C so I have sort of gone into OOP and then out of it again. C is for an embedded device btw, anything I develop for actual usage would normally be C# although I might consider C++ one day.
  14. I got jetpack joyride from it, thats about it. I am quite interested in writing some stuff for it though