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Daerst

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  1. We took one more programmer and a composer on board. Happy to say that our team is also getting more and more international, now including members from Canada, USA, Australia and Germany! ...so what about all you writers on gamedev.net? Get in touch!
  2. We added one game designer / programmer to the team! He currently helps with structuring and streamlining the ideas we have, and creating a more complete roadmap for further development, before diving into the code with us Drop a message if you want to learn more about the project!
  3. SWARMED is a Zombie-themed RPG / RTS currently in development using Unity 3D. We love Dwarf Fortress (though we have no illusions that SWARMED will reach the same level of complexity), roguelikes, old-school point & click RPGs and real-time strategy games. We aim to cross genre-borders here and there and give some twists to the old Martinis every gamer has been drinking since the 1980s, metaphorically. Single player, 3D graphics and adjustable top-down camera - old-school RPG / RTS feeling Take control of a core group of survivors after the outbreak Encounter Zombies that are a real threat, no machine-gun massacre. Don't get swarmed! Build a safe zone anywhere with a highly flexible build system: campsite, lighthouse, school, or fence a whole village Grant asylum to other survivors that you meet and make them a part of your community Achieve sustainability in your safe zone and go on supply runs with your survivors Development The core team of recently founded indie studio Three Eyed Games currently consists of one writer, two artists and two programmers, based in Germany. We are in our mid-20s with professional experience in developing interactive 3D applications with Unity. SWARMED will feature both a 'free-play mode' and a campaign with mid-sized maps that leads the player through a story while explaining the gameplay and introducing him / her to the survivors: a core group a few 'hero' characters the player starts with (each one a detailed character with backstory, hopes and dreams), and more 'heroes' (total not more than 20, probably less) that the player can meet on the journey. In addition, randomly generated NPCs (less detailed and not directly controllable, similar to the way Dwarf Fortress handles its dwarves) can join your safe zone – if you let them. We plan to release a few 'Origin' prototypes that showcase individual gameplay systems and meanwhile give a gentle introduction to the characters you will meet in the game. Origin I, showcasing the build system and many fundamental elements like character controls and interactions, is finished and will be released soon. Next up, we're working on the dialog system to be presented in Origin II. Get in touch and we will provide more details and a playable version. We want you! We seriously think you should join the fun! We are looking for: Level Designers / Environment Artists, preferably with experience in Unity and procedural asset creation. Design and build maps with interesting visuals and proper pacing. 3D Artists. Our shacks, items and the dead guys' faces could use some plastic surgery. Can you do that? Writers. We have a bunch of characters to detail and a story to write ahead of us. Game Designers. We have a rough game design sketched out that needs improvement and completion. We need a balanced combat system, trees for constructions, workshops and character skills etc. PR & Community Managers, preferably with web development experience. We want to build a community around the game, and we need you to plan and manage this (with the help of the rest of the team, of course). 2D Artists / UX Designers, preferably with Unity UI experience. Our menus still look pretty dull, and we don't like that. We also need concept art for characters and iconic game moments to define their look and feel. Coders. If you know your way around Unity and C#, there are lots of challenging things to be done. You will work closely together with the two programmers already on the team to get going quickly. Please drop me a message or contact info@three-eyed-games.com
  4. We've got a solid team of writers and coders - what's missing is the artists, mainly.
  5.     What?   SWARMED is a Zombie-themed hybrid that draws inspiration from many games and genres. Single player, 3D graphics and adjustable top-down camera - old-school RPG / RTS feeling Take control of a core group of survivors after the outbreak Encounter Zombies that are a real threat. Whatever you do: don't get swarmed! Build a safe zone anywhere with a highly flexible build system: campsite, lighthouse, school, or a fence a whole village! Grant asylum to other survivors that you meet and make them a part of your community Achieve sustainability in your safe zone and go on supply runs with your survivors If you wanna compare it to other games, we love Dwarf Fortress (though we have no illusions that SWARMED will reach the same level of complexity), roguelikes, old-school point & click RPGs and real-time strategy games. We aim to cross genre-borders here and there and give some twists to the old Martinis every gamer has been drinking since the 1980s, metaphorically.     Development   The game is being developed in Unity. The core team of recently founded indie-studio Three Eyed Games currently consists of floAr and my humble self, based in Germany. We are both coders in our mid-20s with professional experience in developing interactive 3D applications with Unity. We have worked together on many small indie games and know what we can and cannot do.   SWARMED will feature both a 'free-playing mode' and a campaign with mid-sized maps that leads the player through a story while explaining the gamplay and introducing him / her to the survivors: a core group of 5 'hero' characters the player starts with (each one a detailed character with backstory, hopes and dreams), and more 'heroes' (total not more than 20) that the player can meet on the journey. In addition, randomly generated NPCs (less detailed and not directly controllable, similar to the way Dwarf Fortress handles its dwarves) can join your safe zone (if you let them ;-)).   We plan to release a few 'origin' prototypes that showcase individual gameplay systems and meanwhile give a gentle introduction to one of the characters you will meet in the game. We are currently working on the first one that will showcase the build system. Get in touch and we will provide more details and a playable version.     Hey, you!   I seriously think you should join the fun! We are looking for: 3D Artists- Both our shacks and the dead guys' faces could use some plastic surgery, so no matter whether you consider yourself an 'environment' or 'character' artist, we'd love to hear from you! Writers - We have a bunch of characters to detail and a story to write ahead of us. We have one guy [He's called the Lord. Seriously.] working on this, and some basics are laid out, but I'm sure he'd appreciate some help. Right, my Lord? Coders - If you know your way around Unity / C#, get in touch! Coding is going great so far, but there's more enough work to do. Anything else - You're intrigued by the idea and think you can contribute in some way? Great! Get in touch! Please drop me a message or contact info@three-eyed-games.com   Cheers! Daerst  
  6. 258 works fine. For science I'll try 256 next week and see if that works too.
  7. Got it :) You really need to only add a single line and modify the offsets in MeshConvert's LoaderXFile.cpp: D3DVERTEXELEMENT9 declTanBi[] = { { 0, 0, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT3, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_POSITION, 0 }, { 0, 12, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT3, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_NORMAL, 0 }, { 0, 24, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT2, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_TEXCOORD, 0 }, { 0, 32, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT2, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_TEXCOORD, 1 }, { 0, 40, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT3, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_TANGENT, 0 }, { 0, 52, D3DDECLTYPE_FLOAT3, D3DDECLMETHOD_DEFAULT, D3DDECLUSAGE_BINORMAL, 0 }, D3DDECL_END() }; This will do for me since all my meshes have exactly 2 UV channels. In practice, this should depend on SETTINGS::NumTexCoords (the output vertex declaration already does, so no need to change anything there).   Here's what I added to Blender's X exporter (export_x.py): # Write additional UV coordinates using FVFData FVFCode = 258 Index = 0 for UVLayer in Mesh.uv_layers: if UVLayer == Mesh.uv_layers.active: continue # skip active layer, we already had that self.Exporter.File.Write("FVFData {{ // {} UV coordinates {}\n" \ .format(self.SafeName, UVLayer.name)) self.Exporter.File.Indent() self.Exporter.File.Write("{};\n".format(FVFCode)) self.Exporter.File.Write("{};\n".format(2 * VertexCount)) for Polygon in Mesh.polygons: Vertices = [] for Vertex in [UVLayer.data[Vertex] for Vertex in Polygon.loop_indices]: Vertices.append(tuple(Vertex.uv)) for Vertex in Vertices: self.Exporter.File.Write("{},\n".format( struct.unpack("<I", struct.pack("<f", Vertex[0]))[0] )) self.Exporter.File.Write("{}".format( struct.unpack("<I", struct.pack("<f", 1 - Vertex[1]))[0] )) Index += 1 if Index == VertexCount: self.Exporter.File.Write(";\n", Indent=False) else: self.Exporter.File.Write(",\n", Indent=False) self.Exporter.File.Unindent() self.Exporter.File.Write("}} // End of {} UV coordinates {}\n".format( self.SafeName, UVLayer.name)) Again, this will only work for two UV channels, since for three or more you would have to use DeclData I think. The creepy struct.pack / struct.unpack stuff reinterprets a float as an integer, as expected by the FVFData.   Thanks for your hints, Buckeye!
  8. Thanks for your reply, Buckeye. 258 is a value I found online and also encountered when using MeshConvert to convert from ascii .x to ascii .x - kinda pointless, but with the /tcount 2 option you FVFData with code 258 and all values 0. I don't know why, but it seems to be a broad agreement. I tried some other values. Random values prevent MeshConvert from reading the file, so he at least tries to parse it. 256 and 258 work, 257 doesn't. Everything leads to zeroes in UV channel 1. I think MeshConvert just doesn't use the data,   Regarding the FBX pipeline, I posted the error to MSDN and hope to get an answer there. Quoting myself from here:
  9. Some progress on my end, documented in case anyone needs it...   I have dumped the uncooperative MeshConvert in favor of the DirectX Content Exporter. I downloaded the source and the Autodesk FBX SDK 2011.3.1 and compiled the tool without problems in Visual Studio 2012. I am now able to convert .fbx files to .sdkmesh, which is way more flexible than the .x solution. If you plan to do the same, be wary of the -compressvertexdata- and -force32bitindices+ parameters. The first is enabled by default, an can be disabled using the minus at the end. If you don't do this, you normals etc. are automatically compressed into smaller formats. Since MeshConvert doesn't have such functionality, it's easiest to disable it at first and enable it later if you need it. The same goes for the latter parameter, forcing indices to be 32 bit. If you don't enable this, the Content Exporter uses 16 bit indices if possible.   I now receive values for a second UV channel in my program, but they are horribly wrong. My texture UV channel looks good, while my lightmap UV channel is messed up. If I switch them, so that the lightmap is UV channel 0, it suddenly looks ok but the texture UV channel is distorted. I have no idea whether the Blender FBX exporter or DirectX Content Exporter messes it up, but something is still horribly wrong. If I duplicate my UV channel and output exactly the same UV channel twice, everything looks good. Any ideas?
  10. Hi there,   I'm prototyping a Global Illumination technique by extending one of NVidia's demos (DX11 Samples - Diffuse Global Illumination). The demo uses the CDXUTSDKMesh class to load and render the scene.   What I did so far: Create a test scene in Blender. Unwrap it for texturing and export it using the .x exporter by Chris Foster. Use the DirectX MeshConvert utility to convert my .x file to .sdkmesh format. This works fine so far and has allowed me to fix some carelessness on NVidia's part (e.g. lots of unwanted normal interpolation on flat surfaces and no (!) tangents, although they use normal mapping in the demo...). Now, my technique requires two different UV maps (texturing + lightmapping) for my test scene. What I've tried: Create a second UV map. The .x exporter only handles the active UV map, so I extended it to output the second UV map as follows (pseudo-C++, although it was actually implemented in Python): FVFData { 258; NUM_VERTICES * 2; reinterpret_cast<unsigned long>(uv[0].x), reinterpret_cast<unsigned long>(uv[1].x), ...; } Use MeshConvert with /tcount 2, which creates a second UV channel. Whatever I do, the values of this channel are always 0. The tool does not seem to care about the FVFData at all. IDEA: Use the vertex color and just put the UVs in the RG channels. Unfortunately, MeshConvert doesn't seem to care the vertex color either. IDEA: Load two separate meshes, one with each UV map, and somehow merge them in code. Since the vertex buffers are not writeable, I have not found a way to do this. Any hints, experiences or further ideas are appreciated.   Thanks David
  11. Daerst

  12. Daerst

    Never Team Up with the Idea Guy

    Champloo13, I don't think the article says it's a bad idea to rely on non-technical people when developing games, but to rely on people who "spend 0% on the actual project itself".   Take a game designer for example. Noone will say "It's useless to have a game designer aboard, because he just has ideas and doesn't code the game". But I think it's indeed useless to have an Idea Guy game designer who has lots of ideas, but doesn't (or doesn't have the skill to) merge all the ideas, all the little pieces and all the input from other team members into a detailed, working game concept. If he does that, he is contributing to the project a lot.
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