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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Josip Mati?

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About Josip Mati?

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  1. Yes, I would. As long as the game has great gameplay and/or story (2 major points I look at games). In fact, I often fire my emulators or even consoles I own (SNES, PS1, PS2, GameBoy, GBA) and play those old games simply because I find them more find despite their graphics. That enjoyability, coupled with disappointment like Duke Nukem Forever, is the reason why I mostly stopped looking at major AAA titles and in turn look at indie titles or other lesser known ones despite their graphics. Heck, I bought Ys I+II when they were on sale, games which originally appeared on Sega Genesis (or Megadrive, can't recall correctly at the moment).   Today's kids are too obsessed with graphics...
  2. Jumping in here to say hi. I can't wait to see this year's submissions :)   As Slicer said, we're looking to have a 3rd member for testing Linux games if there's anyone who wants to compete but can't deploy Windows version. Also, we have already 2 people who can support Mac, so same thing works for anyone who's limited to Mac only - if there's need, 3rd judge can set up a machine relatively easily.   I also believe that, if we end up not supporting Linux and/or MacOS and someone submits Windows version and has Linux/Mac version ready, at least one of the judges will take a look into Linux/MacOS version if time allows (though only Windows will be graded).   Anyway, good luck to the participants!
  3. please tell me someone saved those chat logs! =-P   I'm not sure if I want to read it... XD
  4. When. Did. This. Happen. XXXDDD
  5.   Yup, I need music, otherwise I wouldn't accept the offer. Thanks for the warning for the future if similar thing happens :)
  6. Hello   Thanks everyone for your inputs. You've all been a great help, and I have to say, negotiations ended greatly with both sides satisfied. Draft of the contract is completed, and it looks like this: Composer owns rights to the music, while I'll hold the rights to use it in game and any promotional materials indefinitely. If required, I can buy the complete ownership from him. In this case, he retains the usage of his work for self promotion. He gains 25% of my profits until the money owed is paid in full. Only thing that now remains is plain english contract. He feels it isn't necessary, but maybe it would be better for both his and my protection?
  7. Thanks bschmidt for your input as well.   I got mostly positive response to my proposal :) *sighs in relief*   I also got the rates from him... his usual rate is £100 (approx $180) per minute, but is willing to drop it down to £80 (approx $135) per minute for me specifically. He also expressed his concerns, such as him wanting to be able to use the music to promote himself, so it's time to negotiate a little more; after considering a little more, I think I'll rather have him keep ownership but add buyout clause, as I don't even have any idea how much success will I have with game.   Bonus point to his music is that he designs it to be sequenced randomly, which makes it interesting. I'll also have to consider how much I need, but that's for another thread.   Once again thanks everyone for your inputs, this has been enlightening, and dealing like this is brand new experience.
  8. Thank you all for your advices. I've sent him message with the proposition similar to what Servant suggested without stating any specifics. I'll see how he responds to that and see what to do next based on his response. After all, I can't lose anything, while I could gain much.
  9. In addition to what Sean and orizvi said, best way to learn the language is to learn it while using it. Numerous times I found myself learning language's syntax and quirks by just doing various tasks, either homework or my own projects. For the Network Programming course on college I had to quickly learn C for homework, lab assignments and exams.   So, set yourself some projects, going from simplest one as number guessing game and tic-tac-toe to more complex ones.
  10. Wow, thank you for your answers. It was a good idea to ask here :)   If the final product ends looking well, I do plan for full release in order to earn some pocket money, hopefully enough that next time I can actually pay people for things I need (primarily art and music).   SotL, I appreciate the time you put in for such post. It was full of details I honestly overlooked and pointed some issues I need to watch about. After that, I'm not sure if I should enter into any such deals as that one... as it's my first game and hobby project and I'm not even sure if it will end well. One one hand he'll handle a huge amount of work, as I'd have to learn those skills by myself otherwise... on other hand, all those legal issues might be problematic for such small game.
  11. Hello   Few days ago I got a private message on IndieDB from person who was interested in making music for my game. He/she stated in private message that he/she is interested in my game and looks for some working experience, thus is offering to produce some assets for me for free, while also sending me link to his/her showreel.   In my response, I included a question about licence on his music. What I could understood from his/her second answer is: He/she keeps a copyright on all created music and sound I do not pay upfront, but he/she gains royalties from sold copies of game (amount not stated)   Those terms seem fine for me, as I get solid background music without paying immediately as I don't have any money, while he/she gets rewarded for his/her work. However, as it's my first time dealing with such things, I wanted to hear thoughts from more experienced people.   Also, if we get to the deal, what is usually the correct procedure?   Thanks for your time.
  12. There's simply no way game that buggy and unfinished can be considered even as a parody. If it was playable like every other normal game (even many early access games), then maaaaybee... but with the game in this state there's no way.   Heck, even my game in its current state is more playable than that and I for sure don't value my game any more than 2€.
  13. Beat Hazard mega pack here. After trying the demo, I couldn't resist buying it while it was cheap :D
  14. It's there *points*, between *chomp* mustard and *chomp* strawberry cake.
  15.   The joy of constantly clicking "Next" button during installation without reading what will happen. Keep in mind that a lot of installations offer various toolbars etc. to install as well, often checked on by default.