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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Nathan Fiscus

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  1. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1340568808' post='4952419'] [quote] I have read most of the 'sloperama faq' 1. I know the faq says I need to move to where the jobs are, but realistically right now I can't. 2. Secondly, and most importantly, I really want to work in game design mechanics, or possibly level design. I was just never very good at programming. My art skill is quite low, 3. How can I prove my worth? Design documents and one-pagers are nice, but they wont get me a job. [/quote] 1. Okay. So you'll do it later, when you can. Is that not obvious? 2. Okay. So you need a breaking-in path, not programming, and not art. Find another one. 3. By building a portfolio. And a portfolio website. Work on some amateur/indie projects. [/quote] In regards to moving what I mean is, even one day when I have a great portfolio together, should I relocate first? In your faq you mention that I really need to live where the jobs are, but because I have bills, it would be quite difficult to move without a job already setup. Yet I know that my chances are slim to none if the company has to worry about relocation and anything else associated with it. My other question was about the portfolio itself. As long as its clear that my portfolio isn't a game submission, are a few one-pagers acceptable (in addition to other material). Thank you Tom! Your FAQ has been incredibly helpful!
  2. Hello, I want to start by saying I have read most of the 'sloperama faq' and have spent a few months working on 'changing gears' so I have done my homework . I am 22, and have a bachelors in Electrical Engineering. Long story short, I just don't have interest in EE What. So. Ever. I started down the engineering path because I knew I loved problem solving, and I work very well under extreme pressure. I've played games since before I can remember. I still have my Vectrex sitting next to me that I played before my family could afford an NES or SNES. To be quite honest the only reason I didn't pursue game design was because I was afraid the job market would be too overloaded with others going after the same job... so I went for something else I felt I was good at, engineering. Anyway, onto my questions; I have a full time job in Buffalo NY, an apartment, and bills to pay. I know the faq says I need to move to where the jobs are, but realistically right now I can't. I have money saved up, and can pay to move myself, is there anyway to make this 'known' in a resume or cover letter without it seeming strange, or being looked over. Is it even worth mentioning? Secondly, and most importantly, I really want to work in game design mechanics, or possibly level design. I have taken a few C++ classes and I was just never very good at programming. My art skill is quite low, stick figures and basic drawings. However, when it comes to actual design, such as control layouts, traps and powerups, etc, I know I can prove my skill. The problem is of course showcasing my abilities as a newcomer. I need something real to show in my portfolio. How can I prove my worth? Design documents and one-pagers are nice, but they wont get me a job. I've read "Level Up! The Guide to Great Game Design" and have been working on documents, along with working in the Elder Scrolls Creation Kit (I have a major preference for RPGs of any sort).