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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

MikeS

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  1. Very nice article, and thanks for linking to the paper on Largest Empty Rectangle.  I am wondering if you can also provide some information on how you subdivide("shatter") the shapes?  Do you simply divide the rects in 1/2 and continue to divide each subsection that is overlapped in half until the smaller rectangles are not hidden(Similar to a quadtree)?
  2. Thank you for your response.  I will take a look at the gameplay3d source code and then come back with more questions. :)  
  3. Hello GameDev Community, I am currently developing a game framework for the Android system using Java. I have a small runtime scripting language that users can utilize to create models, move them around, and do various things. However, I would now like to start targeting iOS applications. So as a case study, how is an engine like Unity3D implemented? They have various scripting languages(Javascript, C#, etc.), and they can target multiple platforms. Do they implement the same codebase on multiple platforms? For example: They have a Java codebase that implements all of the functionality needed to create android apps, and then they duplicate that codebase to implement all of the functionality they need for iOS apps, etc. How do they deploy to multiple platforms? Are they simply translating source from a target language(C#, Javascript, etc.) and then generating Java code for Android from there Java codebase, Objective-C code for iOS from their separate Obj-C codebase, etc? The overall theme of my question is how do I structure my codebase so that I am not duplicating a lot of work to support multiple platforms. Should I build my own VM that is deployed to each of these systems(I'm aware this will be a cost in performance)? Thanks for your insight.
  4. Hi guys, Thanks for all of the advice. We are going to discuss some of your suggestions and build a decision grid.
  5. Hi guys, Myself and a few like minded individuals are looking to co-locate in one location to continue work on some of our software startup projects. We've developed some products already, and now believe it is time to all work from the same location. I am wondering for those of you who have startups, where is a good city to headquarter in? We are currently considering Chicago, Boston, San Jose area, and Austin Texas. The resources we are looking for are places where there is lots of young talent we can recruit from in the future. Cost of living is also an important factor, as we're on the humble budget of a startup. For those of you who currently have startups, what are the most important resources you have access too? What resources do you wish you had access to? Are there any states or cities in particular that really will back startup tech companies(No, we are not consider Rhode Island).. We're originally from the Midwest, but willing to move anywhere we think we can be successful long term. Thanks for your advice.