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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

obizues

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  1. I'm trying to figure out how I can remove an element from a normal array (not ArrayList) in Java. I tried by just setting the array at the particular index to null, but that's apparently not what he wanted. My only other guess is maybe try to create a new array, use arraycopy from starting at 0 until one less than the element being removed, and then then copying the same array from one element after the one being used to the end of the array you just created. Then reference the old array to the new array and end the method. Any thoughts?
  2. I'm a little confused as to what I should have written still.
  3. I was given a quiz on what an ADT was: I wrote that it was a group of similar data types in a class together that performed a series of Mutations and accessing methods. it also makes the data processes hidden from a programmer that may just use the accessor and mutator methods to achieve what is needed with the driver. I was given a D- and told I was way off. Can someone help me figure out where I went wrong? Everything I look up seems similar to tha and some sites even just claim its a class with private variables. Any help would be appreciated.
  4. I'm trying to fix the problem of just having a bunch of spaghetti code in my game class. I'm trying to use OOP design for the first time in XNA. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to create an entire game loop for the character class, or if I'm only supposed to have that in the Game class. For example, I was trying to load sprites within the character class itself in it's own LoadContent method. Am I not supposed to do that? I fully understand OOP, I can implement everything I want in JAVA, but I'm not sure how I'm supposed to do in within the XNA framework with C#. I tried to just create a "mainLoadContent" method and assign the Texture2D variables to the images with the Content class, and even though it worked in the game class, it wouldn't work in the Character class. If you could point me to some example source code or provide me with a basic explanation that can help with this issue I would appreciate it.
  5. I've made pong, and I am currently working on a top down hack and slash in XNA using sprites. I am a junior/senior studying computer science if that helps gauge a skill level or overall understanding of processes. From here should I go into Unity, or should I try to do 3D in XNA, or move into C++ and DirectX (that is the final goal) I'd like any pros and cons of each decision and what you recommend. I still have. Year or so before I hit an employment market so I can continue to develop my skills an not "skip" any steps.
  6. I understand what you are saying. None of these are arguments, because quite frankly there is nothing to argue about reality is reality. This is further what is confusing to me. [quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1346208702' post='4974302'] Secondly -- putting aside particularly simple games -- many projects require multiple artists (unless they're willing to wait a very long time to get the art made), and while they often try to recruit multiple programmers only one is really [i]needed[/i].[/quote] I guess I'm thinking more about a single "game demo" or for experience to understand how everything works to be employable in game development. Not a full game. The way I see it is: I want to make an RPG or FPS or some other sort of game. I want a level, or a demo. In order to do this I need say 1 model that's animated for a main character, and 1 model that's animated that I can clone for bad guys. I will need 1 gun modeled, or one sword modeled. I do not necessarily understand how the art side works, but I would have thought that would be a fairly common set of things that people modeled for a portfolio to prove that they can "create an RPG FPS 'package'" or for animators "to create a character to function in an RPG or FPS world." [quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1346208702' post='4974302'] Thirdly, a programmer who wants to make a portfolio that is suitable for the games industry will either need to work with an artist or find some other alternative.[/quote] That is the exact problem I'm running into. I can't use characters that people have made and fully rigged and animated because most of them are characters like "mario" or "zelda" that are protected IPs or someone ripped from a disk. I however, also cannot afford to pay someone hundreds to thousands of dollars to create a small demo within Unity. Do you have any suggestions? Perhaps this question is better suited for the "Breaking into the Industry Section" but: If I made a game with mix and matched objects that didn't fully mesh together since they were not designed to be, would that be looked down upon in a portfolio? Or would the person look past that and just look at how the objects are programmed?
  7. I guess I'm missing the reason why 3D artists and animators are removed from the process so much. Why is it standard that I'm paying for models or animations but they aren't paying me to make all these things come together? I'm not just trying to complain, I just genuinely don't understand how everyone doesn't benefit from collaboration.
  8. I am currently finishing my second game in XNA and doing now after taken a good 20 hours of tutorials in Unity I'm ready to start learning more by actually making something. That being said the industry standard is C++ and unless I can have someone tell me that AAA studios would hire me as a programmer with lots of Unity experience rather than moving to C++ at some point I feel I need to get there. In other words, I need to learn 3D with some hand holding of Unity at first, and then moving toward the real stuff. I guess I'm using Unity as a set of training wheels to get there. Like I said though, I only am basing this on what I've heard here.
  9. Sounds to me like you know which the best school is... but this is my OPINION. I would however remind yourself that money is an issue. I have friends that went to a private engineering school and paid 5x out of pocket what most students paid for going to my school. What did they pay for? Networking, prestige, etc. So unless you have a college fund, scholarship, or someone willing to pay your way you need to consider your financial future whether or not you think it matters right now. So it seems like your decision is, do I want to go to a school with a degree based around game design, or do I want to go to a computer science school and focus on programming. I'm a firm believer the school is only as good as the student and sites like these, and others are available for material your school may not cover. If you feel you need a structure of a school to push you into game design, and don't mind being a little financially unstable after graduating I would go to UM. If you feel you can work hard and become a good programmer at another school that costs $15,000 a year less and push yourself into learning game design on your own then I think you can go somewhere else and become financially more secure. Either way you will need to study material not covered in the classroom. Either the time your school spends on game design you will need to probably do some self study on programming practices and frameworks, whereas in the other more general schools you will need to spend your self study time on game design. I don't any software engineering job will hire you without good programming skills, but I do know software engineering jobs that will hire you without game design experience.
  10. [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346106062' post='4973925'] The difficult part is that there are few entry-level jobs created. There are more mid-level jobs available, and having a solid portfolio will open those jobs to you. Instead of an entry level programmer-1 job, you may be qualified for a somewhat experienced programmer-2 job.[/quote] So would you say that it's possible, or even probable to work as a software engineer in some other capactity before being offered a job in the games industry? Is it kind of "programming is programming" mentality, or do they want people that are in the field? [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] For example, they may hard code two players as the assumption, and assume specific keys for specific functions. An advanced programmer will assume an unbounded number of players, will assume that players may have remapped their keys in an options screen, and so on. They will then build systems that handle an unbounded number of players instead of expecting two players; they will build a binding system that binds physical keyp resses to logical key presses. Etc.[/quote] That makes perfect sense, I'm guessing I should probably stop coding in specific keys for functions and rather setting up an input object to handle setting and getting variables for the inputs? [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] Prove that you can do the job of a game programmer. [/quote] Would you say that when applying for a job that uses C++ their own engine and DirectX11 for example, that you should have experience doing just that rather than say using a premade engine like Unreal or using Unity? Or is it seen as once again "programming is programming?"
  11. I've checked out a few sites from a google search but most seem to offer a few free models as a means to look at their pay content. The sticky in this forum seems to include out of date 2D resources. Could everyone list a few of their favorite sites? Just as a question, are there fully rigged and animated models available somewhere as well? I'm trying to worry more about the programming aspect, and less about the art and animation aspect.
  12. More of a marketing question directed at everyone: I live in the Midwest - Milwaukee, Wisconsin specifically. Mr. Sloper has referenced multiple times on his site how important it is to move to where the industry is. To not get too off topic, there is no foreseeable way for me to move out to an area without a job offer in hand. I live in the Milwaukee area right between Madison and Chicago. I honestly don't know how big of a market, if any, there is in Chicago and I'm fully aware California is the place to be. That being said there is a studio in the Madison area called "Raven Software." The law of averages suggests trying to become employed at a single studio is incredibly more difficult than applying to multiple studios. However, this WOULD be a dream job at a company near me doing EXACTLY what I would like to be doing in the gaming industry. I've read and talked to people on this site about marketing yourself, but it has always been more generalized. Questions: 1) How do I go about marketing myself to a SPECIFIC company like that? 2) There is a consultant on LinkedIn that I'm connected to that graduated from UW-Milwaukee (My University) and worked for Raven Software out of college. How do you suggest I ask for advice or how he made that transition without setting myself up to simply be dismissed? Is it something I should not even ask since he doesn't currently work for them anymore and I'm not sure because of what terms or reasoning?
  13. [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] A games portfolio is not strictly necessary for programmers; I know plenty of people who didn't have them, and I've interviewed (and hired) people who didn't have them. A games portfolio just adds evidence that you can do the job well.[/quote] So in your opinion does it benefit me to make a website and build a portfoilio and make games? I was under the impression that breaking into the industry is extremely hard, and it anything I can do above and beyond is something that I should be doing. Is there something else you could suggest I do instead of making a portfolio? [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] When I look at code, it becomes obvious fairly quickly what skill level and experience level the programmer is at. Beginners have code with hard-coded everything; experts build systems that couple together with data. There are many major steps in between the two. [/quote] Could you elaborate on "systems?" Do you just mean that you can tell the difference between someone who just is using spaghetti code and someone who is actually using OOP practice in an intelligent manner? [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] Whatever the case, beginners are generally asked to write code to solve some very basic CS problems. [/quote] Could you give me an example or two of a basic CS problem that you would ask a potential programmer to solve or write code for in an interview you would conduct? [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346025910' post='4973616'] Deciding what to show off in your portfolio (since you have one) is a personal decision. [/quote] I guess my mindset is the following: Programming a game like "Pong" and using collision detection is a way for me to complete a project within a small timeframe while still showing I can complete a project, come up with good programming methods and practices, write clean and understandable code, and show that I understand the game model. Obviously if I made a 3D game using Linear Algebra for collision detection with C++ and DirectX11 that would be a lot greater of an achievement, but it also would probably be unrealistic to finish a "full game" unless I literally made that my job for a year or years. I guess that is where the question of including "Pong" comes in. So I guess what I'm asking is, where does that middle ground fall?
  14. Mr. Sloper, This was used to be more programmer specific since I felt my other questions were too broad did not adequately describe the nature of what I was trying to ask. Yes, feel free to close the others if you feel they are all the same question.
  15. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1346004950' post='4973522'] 1. What new and interesting programming problems can you solve in a pong clone? You can make side-scrolling jumping games for your portfolio, but they should have something new and interesting about them.[/quote] I haven't played the original, but I had single and multiplayer, pause menus, restart ability, music, and because of the menus and different modes multiple states. Like I said I'm not fully sure what violates IP, but I'd rather not have someone from HR leave my website because of have it because I just wanted to show my first game project. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1346004950' post='4973522'] 2. Check the Visual Arts forum. I'm sure this question has been asked and answered many times there. [/quote] Thanks, I did not think of that.