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s.Mason

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  1. [quote name='nox_pp' timestamp='1345206492' post='4970522'] If your resource loader is returning the images/audio from the hash map by reference, then your instance is using the SAME copy and taking up no additional memory (except the size of a pointer/reference.) However, for images, if you're rendering with hardware, then you are also necessarily holding a copy of the image in video memory. Also, I go about my resource loading in a different way. I like to have a completely generic loading backend, when possible, that loads files from some source (generally the filesystem, but could be the network, or an archive) and puts them into memory as a blob. Then, I pass that blob off the particular subsystem to be decoded and whatnot. This way, you don't end up duplicating your file loading logic. Loading images, loading audio, loading models, etc. are all the same at the most basic level. [/quote] Great, thanks for resolving that inquiry of mine. And thanks for the tip there. I'll work on abstracting my file loading logic a bit more so that I could go at the same you do. Thanks [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] .
  2. Since I don't mind reinventing the wheel for the sake of learning something I've been working on a small engine/framework as a foundation to work on some simple games. When I was working on my imageLoading manager (part of the resourceLoading bundle), at the moment I have it set up in a way that once a image is loaded, its temp. held (in memory) by the program as long as its running. If a call asks for an image that hasn't been loaded yet, it does so, else it returns the copy that was loaded and stored in a hashmap (which essentially is in memory). I've also done pretty much the same for my audioResourceLoading manager. Now what I'm thinking of implementing down the road is that the imageLoading manager only holds image files that are under a certain size or animations (other things like static backgrounds can be reloaded if needed). And as for the audio, if its sound effects its pre-loaded onto a clip and therefore its held in memory. But for large audio files like background music, I'm thinking of maybe streaming it and buffering it so that its played as its loaded, with a sourceDataLine. One thing I'm wondering is, I know when i load an image and an instance is presenting it on the screen (using it as representation), its being held in memory. Now if I'm putting a copy of it in a hashmap will that copy be in memory as well? or is it using the same memory space as the first one that was loaded? Same goes for when I create other instances that use this same image as a representation. Does anyone know? And yes I know tools like Slick2D handle all this resource loading stuff for you (or so I've read), but I'm mostly doing it for the learning experience. For example to get that audioLoader going I learned a great deal of the sound API. So yeah, just wanna hear some thoughts on this. ;D
  3. [quote name='Game Design Planet' timestamp='1343351975' post='4963475'] [img]http://gamedesignplanet.com/Repository/Boss.jpg[/img] Here is an example of a Sci-Fi ship I made a while back. It uses the Sci-Fi blue theme. Don't mind the intense contrast, I made it for a game i made in a week for a competition. [/quote] Wow, that's pretty cool. Whats the engineering on this though? are the four legs meant to be engines? Where are the engines? Is the center circle some sort of reactor? I tend to like to design spacecraft that makes sense in a engineering perspective as much as possible so I'm just curious. Other then that, love the detail and style .
  4. @thatOneProgrammer Java or not, you get the point. However I apologize on my criticism, reading it now is barely constructive. I guess what I was trying to say is that you need to think less like a programmer and more like a gamer (if you plan on improving this game and releasing it). For example, I would have been less likely to close the game window if there was at least a quick initial and interactive tutorial on the controllers of the control panel. The fact that you have some text in a help file isn't the way to go either. You're gonna want to give in basic instructions on how to use your interface the first time a user is playing your game. THEN have a help file or something on a website that further explains parts of the game. So that once a player is into your game, they can use that help file or webpage for reference. It should only be there to expand the knowledge the player has about your game if they so wish to do so. It shouldn't have to be read to be able to play the game. Other then that, try to read up a little bit on game design, there are several articles you can find just by doing a google search or checking out the game design forum here. I'll say that especially for a game like this, that is somewhat unusual. You're gonna want to hold your player's hand and explain the most important things of your game in the quickest and most interactive way you can think of. So like I said, do a little bit of research on game design. Lastly, disregard my graphics comment. I tend to praise more functionality and gameplay over graphics. And really unless you're trying to sell this, I'd say just keep using the placeholders and focus on the gameplay.
  5. [quote name='Rybo5001' timestamp='1344572734' post='4967977'] I don't really understand why that isn't already perfect, at a glance I can tell the depth. If it gets darker+darker as it gets deeper, eventually it will be black, most people understand that black means it's so deep that no light gets down there. [/quote] Reading this made think, if you really wanted to add so many layers. What you could essentially do is have different world maps all linked together. For example in reference to that image in which the tiles get darker as the area gets deeper, it could then eventually just be pitch black. A player could then jump through that to realize the player is now on just a lower layer. Its pitch dark so they would need some lighting. ex. tile layer 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 4 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 5 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ so on that little representation there, layer 5 from a top down view would be pitch dark and could potentially be just a endless void. This is all part of game map. When the player goes through layer 5 and jumps through that little entrance there. player lands on new game map tile layer 5 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 7 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tile layer 8 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ with such a method, you could potentially have plenty of layers, you would essentially have players just jumping through different game maps. If done right, getting layers pre-loaded and what not, it could be sync seamlessly with as much depth as you need.
  6. IMHO you got a good start. I downloaded the game. First thing I noticed was the level selector, Seeing no game interface what-so-ever I simply assume this is just a prototype so I let i slip. I select a level, and here is where I'm surprised, immediately I'm thrown into a storyline about a robot (though it could use some work in terms of the actual dialogue, its good enough to get someone emerged to a small extent to at least want to continue through the dialogue). After the whole dialogue, I finally got to that map window and thats when I was just confused and with a "wtf?" reaction... Seconds after I just closed it. For being a game its got too much programmer spice on it. You need to add some more design toppings with a layer of graphics. No offense but I've seen 13 years old make more visually appealing games. And the fact that you using awt and/or swing components such as the buttons doesn't make it anymore appealing. So on a final note, I would say the idea has some potential but it needs some serious work in terms of interface, design, and visuals.
  7. agent A hears rumors of agent B deceiving agent A by talking to agent A's arch-enemy, agent Z. agent A who trusts agent C, gets agent C to confirm rumors.. agent C despising agent B and knowing the rumors are true, confirms rumors are true to agent A. agent A's trust towards agent B decrease and agent A plans on taking action. agent E (who was there when agent C gave the information to agent A regarding agent B) who despises agent C and is more loyal to agent B rather then agent A tells agent B of agent C's demise. agent B immediately to remedy relations *lies* to agent A via saying that the agent he was seen talking to was simply agent E, not agent Z, it was a mix up. And that agent C is the one making relations with agent Z and only wishes to create a distraction via making up rumors about agent B. agent A is now doubtful of both agent C and agent B. agent A then decides to ask agent E to confirm what agent B said. agent E being more loyal to agent B decides to *lie* to cover up for agent B hoping agent B's goals will be achieved. Since agent A trusts agent E, agent A makes up his mind to believe the perpetrator in this whole dilemma is agent C. And now with demise and what not agent A is taking out one of his own! Oh damn, I'm just too good for this. - political savage
  8. Action -> consequence -> Action... and so on. Never ending loop. You'd have to have filters that could log just about every action a player takes and things they say; to whom? when? how?... etc. Then you'd need to give NPCs actions to take based on consequences and not necessarily from actions taken by just the player. Not to over simplify such an extensive topic, but you'd probably end up doing more programming for such a game then you would for an MMORPG. You'd be creating some of the smartest A.I. that has yet to be seen, almost to the point where it might feel like its an actual player.... There would also be a lot pf processing involved. Large amounts of data being processed by each NPC. On top of that you'd have to have a persistent world, else it would be useless. That's why a game of this sort has yet to be done. Some MMORPGs like EVE online, depend on their player base for such random events and evolving missions/quests. They just simply put the tools out there and thanks to players things that were never even coded into the game happen (ex. massive fleet wars, or like in their commercial intro trailer, " a lone wolf faring accross space comes accross a helpless miner who is being attacked by pirates. The lone wolf could just mind his own business or help the miner. The lone wolf helps the miner and soon after a group of reinforcements arrive to help the miner. They thank the lone wolf for helping out and ask him if he'd like to tag along. The not so lone wolf now is part of a group that is part of a bigger squad, that is part of a wing, that is part of a fleet, that is part of a corporation which is part of an alliance of corporation fighting another chain of corporation in an all out galactic war. AND YOU (lone wolf) just that got caught in the middle of it. And none of it was coded into the game. Think about how much code it would take to abstractly make something like that happen, you'd need to have A.I. as closely as intuitive, learning-capable, analytic as human beings. Lastly, I'll finish this with that its been done to small scale in games that usually have multiple endings. Like the fallout series. Such as when you kill townees/villagers (action) and the whole town turns at you and remain pissed at you for a while (consequence). Something like that is just amazing and immerses the gamer that much into the game. So its definitely something that game developer should tackle more at. But at this point, it takes some serious resources. And no game has yet to be made where it fully depends on such mechanism.
  9. haha, jumped off the edge into an endless freefall. Anyhow, if you never do finish your game it will bring loads of experience to you merely by the fact that you attempted it. So there is always a benefit from developing a game, even its an exact clone of something else. It makes more sense if you're a programmer, if you have the time, its a great learning experience. Other then that, I did play minecraft for maybe half a year or so, back when the "minecraft is where its at for voxel gaming era" (mostly before they added all that adventure mode and magic bulls**t and then released it). Heck I even developed several bukkit mods for it myself. And I always had those thoughts on how unrealistic it is and so much more could be added. So like someone else here said, there is always more to expand on, things that could be handled better (realism/physics) and so on. Personally I like the fact that you going for a realistic aspect here, having the player really work for digging themselves that nice little cave to pass the night is a great idea. So I look forward to the development of this game. IMHO you should make a more official thread and/or blog/website or simply re-work your first post and edit the title.... That's of course if you're serious about developing this game. Good luck! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]
  10. [quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1343280805' post='4963190'] Well, that's the info you give to your artist then, all the stuff you've written right here. [/quote] Right, well thank you for the assistance!
  11. [quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1343267878' post='4963141'] You could go more 3D and use a cell-shading rendering method, or you could go more 2d and use vector cartoons, or you could do the same thing with a raster art program. [/quote] I think the close-up one was more of a background type rather than the actual sprite used for the game. Either way, I'm not really aiming for cartoony but I like the color scheme. At least of the actual ship. I want a more serious look since its not suppose to be the casual space invaders shoot em up type of game. I'm picturing white or greys, and black for the hull of the ships with possibly purples, reds and blues for any external outlining or special designs (colors varying by type of ship of course). As for interface more of a high tech neon blue. The type you would see in most sci-fi spaceship related movies. Something like [img]http://images.clipartof.com/small/1111629-Clipart-Futuristic-Tunnel-With-Neon-Blue-Lights-Royalty-Free-Vector-Illustration.jpg[/img] that would also be the type of propellant coloring for most space ships. One side of the game is the type that is more depicted of the future, the whole shiny crispy and clean type of feel. Yet on the other side think of a mechanic's work area.
  12. I'm adequate with graphics, drawing and art in general But I'm no artist. I'm more of a programmer. Which is why I'm wondering if someone in this forum could tell me if they can tell what it would take to make something like this: [img]http://lh3.ggpht.com/_e9nqETGDfUo/TLOnVOFze9I/AAAAAAAAAtk/6WPf7wMZ_ZM/spaceship_nonrim_thumb.png[/img] Sorry if the image is too small but its off the internet. I like this art style very much for a game I intend to make. I'm wondering what this art style would be called. And/or if for example a 3D model was made and then flattened into a 2D sprite to get this. Any input would be appreciated.