Ant

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    bendabee
  1. Hiya Kenneth, I replied back if I'm not mistaken ;)
  2. You are right. I have not disclosed that sort of information. My goal with this advert was to "pitch the game" to people, and when interested people reply they get a more ample scope of the project and the team. Most projects do talk about that, and I myself have in the past when posting for other projects and/or positions, but not having that info laid out allows me to ascertain what sort of people I'm dealing with when they contact us, if they have had experience with these sorts of project, if they understand what components a team has, etc.   I don't believe that not being registered is synonymous of what you said. I would consider the "hobbyist" headline a stronger indicative that people are expected to work in a consistent manner, so that deadlines and schedules can be made and reached, but in a comfortable manner that allows team members to balance their own personal work and their involvement in the team.   Lastly, I completely agree with you (and we've experienced that). It's hard to have people working to the beat of the drum if they have more pressing things to work on, or if they don't feel that driven to compromise so much of their own time, but then again - that varies from person to person. We, as a team - and under these conditions, can only work if people all have the same level of motivation, are driven and professional. Motivation may fluctuate and vary throughout the project, and i think that's a bit unavoidable, but I believe that as a team (and specially if you're leading the team and/or managing it) it should be your aim to always help keep morale up by producing quality content. I believe that ends up being your "stick".
  3. Hello! I’m António and I'm the team lead and Game Designer of Black Helga - a collaborative and hobbyist group of people spread through mainly the US and Europe. We’re working on our first title, codenamed “Trickshot” and we're looking for a skilled Producer to join our team. THE PROJECT: Trickshot is a 2D action-adventure game with strong puzzle, platformer and stealth elements. It tells the tale of Addëin, a young girl gifted with magical powers. It's a game about experimentation. It focuses on Addy's unconventional abilities and her playfulness, creating crazy solutions to the problems she will face. Our goal is to develop a single level demo / vertical slice of the game. Something concrete, fun and that shows depth. Something we can share, gather feedback, impressions and then study the possibilities to make it into a full game. To sum it up - for now, this is just us, investing on this idea, and hopefully we can later move this onto being a paid gig. We’re looking for a Producer, a self-starter who helps drive the project, coordinating with all departments to ensure we are meeting our deadlines, that we are following our vision and working to make an astonishing game! You will be the center of communication for the whole team, organizing our activity, schedules, deadlines and keeping track of things, creating and maintaining checklists. Ideally, we’re looking for someone with experience in Production/ Project Management (possibly in games). A great communicator, that is active, passionate and driven. We value communication, integrity and willingness to learn, and we’re looking for those that share our values. Someone that if we lived in the same area we could meetup at a coffee place and chat about the project, our goals, ideas and stories. So, are you driven? Organized? Proactive? Eager to team up? Then contact us at blackhelga.games@gmail.com , including [Producer] + [Your name] in the subject line. Introduce yourself, tell us about your experiences, what want out of all this, and show us some samples of your work. (Even if you don’t quite fit any of these roles but are still interested, don’t hesitate to say hello!) Thanks much, António Duarte Silva   (Here are some samples of what our team has been working on)    
  4. Well, first of all a game designer is not necessarily "a guy with great ideas". He might be, but he must, above all, be able to structure ideas and build the non-existing game given certain specifics. Second, do you find yourself losing interest because no progress is being made? Is it because you're going at it as a hobby? If it was your job to sit in front of a computer and work out game mechanics, the challenge of it all, "dance" with all your given restrictions, etc - would you be able to do it (do you see yourself doing it)?   Now 3D art, that's completely different. You basically sculpt concepts given to you, having into account poly counts, loops,  and again - restrictions. Level Design is, to me, an art. It's knowing how to make the level playable and direct the player where he/she should go, challenging him/her along the way and in the end the player feels like he/she's improved. Depending on the size of the studio you work in a game designer might end up doubling as a level designer.
  5.   Well, I would say because they are "proven formulas" and things a small studio can get a few coin out off.   And I don't know much about programming but I think that genre might be overlooked due to the complex programming behind it. Not only that but easely assessible game engines like UDK and Unity don't really excel in with Strategy functionalities and gameplay (IMHO).
  6. Chain of Events

    You could try and make a quick prototype of this with Twine, just to test out the story.
  7. I think the whole Extra credits series I one of the best "tools" that we have - talking as an aspiring game designer :P They really examine a lot of aspects, some times not so directly connected to game design but something that ends up being important to know, and well, that's one of the main things I always hear about "being a game designer" is that you have to know as much as you can of everything xD Also, there are a lot of interesting articles of Gamasutra your friend could read ;)
  8. I'm developing two games but I have no "credentials" as a game designer. Still, if my opinion is of any relevance I would say the 2nd option because if the job conditions were indeed so seductive then I believe the company would be solidly established in the industry, thus me showing them my concepts would be, despite my personal fears - acceptable. But only by mail. On a forum you have little control over who's reading it and I believe in my games (and in their potential), so, if possible, I would avoid such a public display.
  9. Is there a word/page limit?