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siamii

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  1. Agree about media and culture. There is a theory that human behavior is essentially a function of past experiences, genes, and some randomness. Media and culture ceertainly has a big effect on how we view the world. There is also the concept of influence, like in sales, as well as religion and politics. Some people literally kill themselves for God. This means overriding their basic survival instinct. Dan denette talked about cultural memes where memes compete with each other through their hosts, humans, essentially controlling their behavior, and they evolve over time. Memes are like ideas and concepts stuck in the brain. Maybe in terms of games behavior shaping is more accurate word.
  2. Im not talking about mind controlled games but the other way around. One thing games excel at is shaping human behavior by stimulating the pleasure centre through operant conditioning. Many people find it hard to control their gaming because it is so fun. Many drugs like alcohol or cigarettes also stimulate the reward centre. Since game environments are fully controlled by game designers, could they be used in the future for more aggressive behavior shaping that comes close to mind control? Operant conditioning techniques are used on many animals to make them perform complex tasks that look intelligent, I.e. play basketball, paint pictures or even do teamwork and communicate with each other in order to achieve a task. In addition, scientists managed to control the movement of rat by stimulating its brain parts connected to its whiskers and then stimulate the reward centre to encourage the behavior. Since all animals including humans seek pleasure and avoid pain, these techniques are rather effective. I wonder how the complex environments created in games could be used to apply rewards and punishments and shape human behavior in a controlled manner, effectively conditioning them to act certain ways, I.e. mind control? I know some techniques are used in schools today in the form of marks, or by religious authorities, but perhaps what could be unique to games is the fully controlled environments and very sophisticated virtual worlds. Maybe in the future some day?
  3. Hi Spiro. Thanks for your answer. I don't want to hijack the original question as there were some good posts in this thread. Point is addiction isn't very clearly defined. The reason I asked is because I have other opportunities available to me as I generally did quite well in school when I didn't play, but not so well when I played. So I chose not to game for many of my school years. Still gaming has been really close to me as I find it quite interesting in general, like nothing else in life. But I am always scared when I look at the effects it has on me. Many times I get involved in gaming so much that my school marks drop and I even talk to my real life friends much less often and I gain weight and lose motivation in most other stuff like school. I don't know if I am addicted to gaming or just really enthusiastic about it. So now after Uni in computer science I have to ask myself if I want to make a living in game design or rather have a career in something unrelated and try to avoid games because no matter how much I like them they are harmful to me. Maybe if I worked as a game designer this enthusiasm could be converted into something productive but I am not sure if this is whats gonna happen. However I also don't want to live a life devoid of gaming but it seems that's the only choice I have? I can compare my experiences to yours when you were in high school but the difference is that when I saw my marks drop really bad I decided to quit gaming and focus on my schoolwork instead of continue gaming and drop out.
  4. If you like games so much that some people might say you are addicted, would you make a good game designer in the industry and have a happy life? Or should you rather avoid games because you might be addicted and do something else?
  5. Has anyone who works in the game industry had suffered from video game addiction?
  6. [quote name='siamii' timestamp='1343523859' post='4964163'] In short, do you want a big starcraft or MMORPG but focused more on tactical battle? [/quote] @Acharis You control units and collect resources just like in starcraft or AoE. The match is persistent just like WoW. Each time you connect, you can choose to create a new base, or join an existing base in team melee mode. I call a base a faction. The point is there is always a few people online for each faction, so the units and resources are managed continuously by some person. So it's not like you play it for one month continuously, although you can lol. You know how in an FPS server there is always some people online, who are the RED team? Well the RED team never has 0 players, unless the server has no players which is very rare if it is a popular server. Think of the RED team as a faction. If there's no players online for a faction, the AI takes over in easy mode until someone joins again. @Osidlus Perhaps, there could some penalty imposed for switching between factions too fast, aka spying. For example, a time limit. The tactical map would be a great idea, something along the line Company of Heroes has? What do you mean connected to its designer via intercomm? Do you mean voice chat? Also by time steps do you mean turn based RTS where there is a time step every 30 sec or so, and this would be visible to the rank of the player? Also how would players gain rank? @SimonForsman well you could control only a little squad but then you lose all the other aspect of RTS games, such as resource collection, base planning, macro, which is great fun. Also people could choose do whatever they feel like, so if they want to focus on managing expansions while some other player focuses on harassment, that's a big plus. Managing battles is actually only one part of RTS. Another player could focus on unit production, while another player focuses on micro? I'll look into the way WoW manages player instances as you described. Ideally a player should only know about what is happening to his faction and what is visible on his map that is not covered by the fog of war. The point is this should still be a fast paced RTS. Bases can be quite extensive with 100+ of expansions and great income, so if one player decides to troll, that still wouldn't have that big of an effect. They could be banned as well. Another thought about unit upgrades, the cost of upgrades could increase exponential and the benefit only logarithmic, so that factions that have been in the game for longer do not have a huge advantage over new factions, but still some.
  7. The zone type loading would work great. As for the disagreement between players about what to build, the bases or in other words, factions, could be either private or open. If open, players that are abusive could be kicked out by majority voting. Other than that, it's really up to the faction to come up with a viable strategy, so if they cannot agree, they will lose the game to a faction that works well as a team [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]. I mean team work is essential in many games nowadays. Perhaps the maximum concurrent online players per faction could be cut down to 8 so that communication works better within the faction. Also, players would not start a match any time they want, but rather join or leave a single persistent match, much like it is done in WoW where you join the Realm or leave the Realm any time you please. A Realm = a Match. This persistent match lasts for many months. Each time you connect, you can join to a different open faction or create a new faction of your own in which case your starting base spawns somewhere on the map, similar to the way in an FPS game you can spawn at many places or join the opposing team if you want to. Alliances between factions would be also possible As for the lockstep problem, how does WoW solve this in PvP?
  8. Apart from free for all, most FPS have 2 teams. Why not more, i.e 3 or 4?
  9. You start with a typical Starcraft match with the following differences: instead of 8 players per match, you have 1000+ players per match instead of 1 player per base, there can be 50+ players per base with team melee (shared unit and resource control) instead of a match lasting 20-40mins, a match lasts many days or months. instead of a normal sized map, you have a 1000x larger giant map. instead of having all the players join in the beginning and leave in the end, any player can leave and join any time they want during the match, (much like in an online FPS game) instead of resource locations disappearing when mined out, resource locations replenish after a while if no player is nearby. A new player can spawn his own base or he might join an existing base with team melee. If a base has no players online at the moment, the AI controls it. What technology or game engine would be most suitable for this game?
  10. Hi, I've got an idea for an RTS game like Starcraft or Age of Empire, but with a massively multiplayer giant persistent world or map with up to 1000 factions and each faction's units. resources and base is controlled by up to 64 players in team melee mode. Anyone can join any time they like. What technologies should I learn for this?