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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Zack Gregg

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  1. [quote name='greenvertex' timestamp='1343759708' post='4964943'] [quote]What im needing to know is what is a book/program i could get to get me started?[/quote] The first thing you'll need (well, not technically, but if you're just starting out you should seriously use one) is an [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_development_environment"]IDE[/url] like [url="http://www.flashdevelop.org/"]FlashDevelop[/url] or [url="http://fdt.powerflasher.com/"]FDT[/url]. Both are free and obscure a lot of the mxmlc (the open-source AS3/Flex compiler) stuff you won't necessarily ever need to care about. If you're looking for a good book to get you on your feet, I'd highly recommend [url="http://www.amazon.com/Essential-ActionScript-3-0-Colin-Moock/dp/0596526946/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1343758075&sr=8-1&keywords=essential+actionscript+3.0"]Essential ActionScript 3.0[/url]. The O'Reilly books are always great references and this one should get you up and running regardless of your prior programming experience level. From there, the only thing you need to be sure to do is to write code. This should go without saying but the most valuable learning you're going to get is through trying something, having it not work, and figuring out why. If you want to make games, start where everyone starts: the pong clone. This should be fairly easy in AS3 and doesn't require an understanding of some of the darker arts of game programming but it does cover a lot of essentials. Things you should be able to talk about after you've finished:[list] [*]What is an update loop? How would you go about setting one up in AS3? [*]How do you handle input for your game in AS3? [*]How do you detect collisions? What do you do once you've detected one? [*]How do you create a basic A.I.? How can you tweak it to make lower/higher difficulty levels? [/list] [quote]I also read somewhere math skills are needed but my math skills are terrible does this screw me completly?[/quote] Not at all. Don't let anyone tell you any differently. What math you need is pretty basic geometry (at least, to start). So long as you can plot a point on a Cartesian graph you're going to be fine. If you find a problem that you can't seem to solve with a basic understanding of algebra just view it as another opportunity to learn something new. You'll probably eventually come across some basics of linear algebra: vectors, points, and transform matrices specifically. They can seem pretty daunting at first (matrices especially) but you will most likely only run into them after you've already understood most of the concepts surrounding them. [quote]I dont mind devoting a year or two on learning this i just want to see progress.[/quote] Then you've picked a good language to start in. AS3's going let you see something moving around the screen within minutes of picking it up. If you work at it, you should have pong done within a few days to a week. [quote]Average cost to get me started?[/quote] Completely free without the book. There are actually plenty of posts online in AS3 game development if you want to go that route. I came from a computer science background and bought the book, it only ended up taking me a few nights' reading to be effective in the language. Depending on your background your mileage may vary in that regard... [quote]Im not rich but i want to start making simple flash games and java like games such as runescape/Deadfrontier in the future i just have no idea where to start or begin.[/quote] Start with simple games. Make pong, then try adding new mechanics to it - power-ups maybe? Make a platform game if that interests you, or a tile-based adventure game. Just go out and get some experience under your belt, it won't cost you much (or anything) other than your time. As to where to begin, I'm sure opinions differ, but see above. [quote]I also have 0 experience in anything required to do this.[/quote] Meh. You knew enough to start with a simpler language. I'm sure you're familiar with the math needed for simple games. I would imagine the only thing really missing is the programming knowledge. That can be learned pretty easily. [quote]I have been messing with Gamemaker 8.1 Seems interesting but the simple fact is there anyway to sell the game i make with this? My Goal is to make a Multiplayer game i can sell/make profit with but also play it myself[/quote] I only briefly looked at the site but I didn't find any licensing information there. I'm not sure if/how they handle commercial use but if you're looking to really learn the programming aspect of game development, I'm of the opinion you should steer clear. Most of the meat to be had (read: knowledge) will be hidden behind their engine. You don't want that, you want to know how to do those things yourself. Hope that wasn't too long-winded for you. Good luck in any case! [/quote] Yeah this will help me alot i love to read so i didnt mind the long message i plan to devote about 6-7 hours tonight on getting started
  2. Thanks i tried google and it was no help to me
  3. First off i really hope this is okay to post this here If not i do apologize. What im needing to know is what is a book/program i could get to get me started? I also read somewhere math skills are needed but my math skills are terrible does this screw me completly? I dont mind devoting a year or two on learning this i just want to see progress. Average cost to get me started? Im not rich but i want to start making simple flash games and java like games such as runescape/Deadfrontier in the future i just have no idea where to start or begin. I also have 0 experience in anything required to do this. I have been messing with Gamemaker 8.1 Seems interesting but the simple fact is there anyway to sell the game i make with this? My Goal is to make a Multiplayer game i can sell/make profit with but also play it myself