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DtCarrot

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  1.   Yes, I would agree that the traffic system is terrible. Often times I find my city really jammed all the time even when I used the biggest road available with at least 2 paths from the main city(Not sure whether I was just a noob in managing traffic :( ). I think that it would be really cool if there were other methods of transportation like a sky train and so on.This actually gives the user more options of transportation... 
  2.   Yes, I would agree that sometimes having too much politics would actually act as a deterrent sometimes as it may increase the complexity of the game which may deter casual gamers. However, I believe that politics may be necessary to add flavor to a city building game. It can be as simple as actually introducing a few random nations which can act as trading partner supplying crucial materials, military allies which simply helps you in the event of the war.   Each nation can have different personalities, some are rather aggressive and will attack you if things go around a couple of times while others are conceding which will never be offended no matter what you do. Some things that you build in your city will irk them. For example, building an oil refinery will actually incur the wrath of a nation specializing in oil refining due to the competition that will arise. On the contrary, if you provide disaster aid to some nations, the relationship will actually increase.         Actually I think the attracting population feature would be to me, an additional alternative to playing a city building game. Instead of relying on a small labor pool, you can opt for a different style of playing, actually attract foreigners to work be it them being skilled or unskilled. However, like most features, there has to be a drawback, if you attract too much foreigners, the locals would actually feel angered and lose their sense of belonging causing tension in the community itself.    I'm just curious, what type of setting are you looking at? Ancient, medieval, modern, futuristic?  
  3. A partial city building fan here. What makes City Building exciting for me was that I enjoy games which actually make me think and looking at how my city builds into a flourishing economy.    Personally, I enjoyed playing Tropico 3 and Tropico 4. The complexity and realism of the game really impressed me.   Just a summary, it's a game about building a city in the Caribbean during the Cold War period. Other than building a city, you have to manage the diplomacy between USA, Russia and Europe as well as keeping the different factions in the city happy. Building churches to appeal the religious people, having free housing to appease the communist and so on.     What I liked about that was the high level management required to rule the island. You have to plan how you want your city to develop economically and politically right from the start. Also, the game actually gives you a lot of freedom to control how you play the game. You can actually implement policies which helps to propel your island forward in a certain direction. For example, if I wanted the city to rapidly increase in population, I can basically allow immigrants, regardless of the skill level to enter the city. 
  4. This was a really awesome article, really broadened my view of Japanese Game Design. Thanks for this great article! Will certainly be visiting your blog.
  5.   Yup, I watched the Hunter X Hunter 2011 version :) 
  6. It's important to note how you want to develop the 'class' system which is the aura type players have. Do you want to let them have a choice at the start, whether they want to be a transmuter, enhancer, etc, or simply randomizing the player's class?   I think that there can be a body diagram(Like a minimap) somewhere in the screen so the player can view the percentage of Nen in whichever part of the body. Thus, you click the part of the body you want to transfer from, select the amount of Nen you want to transfer from a meter and click the place where you want to transfer the Nen too. This makes the application of Ryu easier, allowing you to stimulate the increase in fist power to attack your enemy.    For progression, I think that their skill level can increase as they defeat more monsters which are about their skill level using methods which relates to the specialty of their skill. For example, Transmuter which specialize in changing their aura into actual things like how Killua creates electricity to defeat his opponent.
  7. I think that tycoon games usually refer to a large-scale economic game where you play from a management point of view. It is one where you basically act as a manager or CEO and manage your company, staffs, factories, retail shops and so on. It also tends to mimic real life which can give a feeling on how it's like to be an entrepreneur   On the contrary, Gamers play these crafting-centered game as an individual where you are often times just controlling one character. Often times, these crafting games would be followed by hunting, mini-games(social games) as a method to be able to obtain raw materials in order to craft. Thus, I doubt these games can be deemed as tycoon games, but rather economic-centered games.
  8. For me, I always look for games whose features are unique and fresh such as Guild Wars 2 who introduced quite a number of interesting features, underwater combat and World VS World PVP.    Also, advertisement is definitely important since it helps to generate hype and let people be aware of your game and thus potentially increasing the player base. I've seen many awesome games which have low player base as they are practically hidden in the shadow and eventually falter away due to the lack of income to support the game.
  9. I feel that what how a player organizes their transportation network really determines the development of the city in the long run. If the roads are built inefficiently, traffic jams are likely to occur which slows down the economy and to a certain extent, how fast troops can be mobilized which affects the total time taken for the army to reach another planet for combat. In RTS games, every second is important. Your allies in other planet may be trying their best to hold off the enemy troops where they can be down another second. Being late by a bit can have a significant impact on the war.    Also, when building the city, it is imperative to balance the various aspect, economy, happiness of the common folks, R&D and the military since they each have a significant impact on each other. If they raise too large of an army, the economy may be unable to maintain them and thus, may cause the city to go in debt.    Maybe for an MMO city building game, I feel that trading will be rather important, how you can export things to others to earn money, import things to make up for a lack of a certain product and so on.   One of my favourite city building game would be Tropico 3 since it had a really complex economy system and where you construct your buildings really had a major impact on the game. Building too many factories may cause protests by the environmentalist, too little religious building will cause resentment among the religious people. You had to balance all the aspects as much as possible to appeal to the majority.
  10. [quote name='Caldenfor' timestamp='1357710161' post='5019372'] What do you mean, "essential items"? Why does a potion need to be essential? Why can't it just be a perk? [/quote]   Actually, potion as an essential may vary from game to game. In this game, it is rather important since it's really difficult to survive against bosses and more powerful monsters without potion. Thus, I would classify it slightly to the essential side rather than a perk. If one of your mercenaries die, you must use a potion to revive them else you have to walk all the way back to town to revive them.   [quote name='Caldenfor' timestamp='1357710161' post='5019372'] Basic equipment is reliant upon definition. What do players need to start the game with? If they need all of this extra gadgetry/itemry, perhaps gear isn't the flaw of the game? [/quote]   Generally, equipment are obtainable through item boxes which will be given by the game or easily looted from mobs and thus players will have no problem getting it.     [quote name='Caldenfor' timestamp='1357710161' post='5019372'] As for needing more money to do something before you can actually turn a profit? Doesn't this just provide extra benefit to rich players? New players need to be able to compete as well. [/quote]   This only applies for some craft items, there are other types of craft skills in which players can learn while earning a profit at the start but they may be more intensive and slightly less profitable. Yes, I agree that it may provide extra benefits to the richer player, but it's not so bad as you may see. The loss is really minimal but players can sacrifice their money in the long run while forgoing some equipment.     [quote name='Greatak' timestamp='1357687741' post='5019263'] NPC merchants are usually unrealistically expensive. [/quote]   Regarding this, I think that games should have NPCs whose goods are rather expensive. It can work as a last minute resort in case the market runs out of supply. In this case, players can buy from the NPCs to fit their emergency needs though it may be much more expensive.   [quote name='Greatak' timestamp='1357687741' post='5019263'] Also, I would recommend against implementing strict castes. Maybe make crafting classes, so certain players can only make certain kinds of items, but don't restrict their ability to do other things in the game. Combat shouldn't be exclusively classed apart from crafting, it gets boring that way. [/quote]   Yes, I agree with this. Players should not be limited to a few crafting classes. Sometimes, their solution may be just to create another new account and learn the remaining crafting skills available. Yes, combat should be separate from crafting. Some players may prefer just playing the economy and not grinding. Thus, it helps to appeal to a different crowd. They can also help to provide the crafting supply which helps to maintain the supply and demand structure.
  11. [quote name='hpdvs2' timestamp='1357619679' post='5018902'] This made me think of an interesting concept, when first facing some type of enemy, or armor, your troops don't know the weak points in their defenses, and so target anything.  (maybe these things don't have heads)  But as they learn, and start to become effective, the information of how to beat them spreads.  sort of like white blood cells becoming more effective at targeting disease.  And of course, the longer a unit has survived battle against another race, the more they begin to instinctively know where to shoot.   [/quote]   I like this idea. This also gives the player motivation to keep his units alive for as long as possible preventing it from dying by coming up with cost effective units.    Zepher, an alien species with lacks intelligence and merely relies on instinct to battle. Thus, their units are generally weak but due to their abundance in supply, they are rather cheap and can be produced in a very short period of time. It kind of works like Zerg the way and I will be including your idea. Their specialty lies in their adaptation skill. The damage the enemy deal to them will decrease as they come in contact more often with them. But I was thinking, how can contact be defined? Based on how many kills they have, how many times they attacked the opponent, how many times they have been attacked or the duration of contact with them? They have several skills with unique ability as well. Scythe which can slightly close in on the opponent from the distance and launch a sudden attack which deals a lot of damage, Ucra, a mega creature with sharp claws able to hit multiple targets at once. It's special skill would be to jump and stun targets near it's landing area.
  12. [quote name='Gava' timestamp='1357613710' post='5018872'] What if you eradicated all merchant NPCs from an MMORPG? [/quote]   If you got rid of every single NPC, the economy will be reliant on how player plays the game and how they create the supply and set the pricing. One of the potential problems with that would be the lack of a fixed price for essential items such as potions, basic equipment and so on. Without control, the prices for these essentials may be unpredictable. It can become too low or become too high. If the price increases, it could be difficult for beginners at the start since they may be unable to afford them as easily compared to veteran players.    Once again, I would like to reference Atlantica Online and Goonzu Online since both their economic principles are almost the same. Almost every single available-in-game item is only available through PvE or crafting which requires material obtained from PvE with the exception of some basic items such as potions which the low level used. This gives a security cap to ensure that newbies do not have problem getting the basic essentials.    [quote name='Gava' timestamp='1357613710' post='5018872'] Could you conceive a fully player driven barter economy to be sustainable? I mean removing completely the concept of money for trade. You need to exchange items for items or make your own from raw materials. [/quote]   I like the idea of a fully player driven barter economy. As interesting as it be, it may get a bit too troublesome for players. Imagine that someone would like to trade a short sword for a short dagger. However, I have a short bow, I am unable to trade with them and may have to trade a short dagger with someone else in order to get it. Despite that, it might increase the amount of interaction in the MMORPG.   Also, yes. It may require a large population base in order to achieve it so that players can easily get their materials and prevent item shortage.    [quote name='Gava' timestamp='1357613710' post='5018872'] I can see a lot of pressure being placed in the “production” players, a lack of a certain class could cripple the game (but prices should sky rocket for the unavailable items making the class more appealing so a balance should be achieved in the long run). [/quote]   Referencing back to Atlantica Online, it has a crafting system such that there is no limitation to the amount of crafting skills you can learn. Some very profitable crafting skills may set you back economically when the player first starts learning the skill since the items that players need to produce is very unprofitable and can make a lot of losses.   For the modifiers available for the item, it could be such that the stats could be randomized and depend on the player skill as well as luck. Some eqs may have very high stats while others being weak. The better one naturally fetches a higher price.
  13. I would like races to be totally different from each other in terms of style, strategies and so on since it gives the race their own unique identity and to casuals, the opportunity to play another race when they feel bored of the current and thus motivating them to continue playing the game. Moreover, it also allows the game to appeal to a larger crowd. Some gamer prefer micro-management while others may prefer playing with tactics. Some love to play an aggressive play style and others, defensive.      However, it is imperative that the different races have to be balanced, not just creating races just to provide a variety of game play. It would mess up the game in the long run instead of helping.
  14. Zerts - Ancient tall spiritual warriors who battle using the spirits of wind and thunder. Initially, they start off as normal warriors and can only call on the powerful of the spirits after years of spiritual training. Thus, their units have long building time and yet expensive. With wind, they kill their enemies swiftly and yet quietly. With thunder, they destroy numerous targets in one go. They can cast rituals to call upon wind or thunder to boost their power. When near a church, they can activate Save's Thunder or Spectre's Wind which greatly boosts their combat ability. It lasts for 1 minute. When injured in battle, they can cast the skill meditate to restore their health quickly but however needs to be uninterrupted for 2 minute. Able to fight effectively though outnumbered.
  15. Personally, I enjoy MMORPG with have a well-structured economic system since I enjoy trading in game. Buying and selling items as well as giving finding ways and means to earn more money such as buying items beforehand and wait till an event which increases the demand starts so that I can earn a lot of money.    Atlantica Online and Goonzu Online by nDoors have one of the more interesting economic system in my opinion. In Goonzu, you can somehow trade with other players from other servers. Atlantica Online has an elaborate crafting system which helps to create a dynamic economy.    However, I feel that players generally do not enjoy the economic principle of the game. They would rather grind to earn the money, maybe it is just faster in the short term and require less thinking as well.    Fluctuation is an inevitable part of an economy. I feel that how serious it becomes depend on how well structured the economic system is.