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rockseller

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  1. The Google Play store already has a built in option where you specify what DisplaySize you want to target. Uncheck the medium one, or google it further
  2. When initializing the game, I do create temporary objects for X reasons. When the game is ready for the main update loop, there is a series of small hiccups, that doesn't last much. What is the best approach to eliminate these hiccups? I was thinking in a black screen that would last X seconds once the main update loop is readt, this way the GC would enter (I hope) before I let the user play. What do you think?
  3. Good day community, I'm looking for some help, I'm currently developing a 2D game using OpenGL ES 2.0 and the default Android SDK, targeting games above Android 2.2. Let's say that I have 100 items. Each one of those items might have a preview texture inside an atlas. Maybe 10 item preview per a big atlas to optimize. But once the item is equipped, I need an independant texture per item. The thing is that I load the entire textures when the game starts, usinh quite a lot of memory. Is this a good aproach? Should I rather load the required textures to OpenGL when the user equips the tem? Thanks in advance
  4. Thank you guys for all the replies, all are very helpfull and interesting to read.
  5. [quote name='Madhed' timestamp='1346954770' post='4977294'] 1 class with 100 methods VS multiple classes with a few methods is not really about performance but more about sensible design. Why do you think one "mega class" would perform better? [/quote] From developer.android.com best practices: [i][b]"Object creation is never free. A generational GC with per-thread allocation pools for temporary objects can make allocation cheaper, but allocating memory is always more expensive than not allocating memory."[/b][/i] [i][b]Thus, you should avoid creating object instances you don't need to..[/b][/i] Unless I'm wrong, having 1 class with 100 methods, over 1 class, and 10 subclasses, each one having 10 methods, will result in 1 object vs 11 objects What do you mean with sensible design? [quote name='Radikalizm' timestamp='1346955133' post='4977299'] How can you optimize code without profiling? How can an optimization be effective if you don't know whether you're dealing with a bottleneck or not? I've worked on some larger projects myself, and I can tell you for sure that premature optimization is something you definitely want to avoid. Write your code according to the proper standards. If you're working with OOP then make sure you properly follow the rules of an object oriented design. A class with 100 methods is definitely a serious violator of the single responsibility principle, which is an enormously important concept within OOP. If you find that you're having performance issues after following the proper standards you should not resort to micro-optimizations, but you should look at optimizations at a larger scale. Rewrite algorithms which pose a bottleneck, go over some larger systems and see which components could be altered to run faster, etc. If this still shows performance problems you should probably consider whether it's the design itself which just isn't optimal for the problem you're trying to solve, micro-optimizations should be at the very end of the optimization progress when every other step did not provide a proper solution IMO. [/quote] My point was to explain my realization about the fact that you can't follow a guide line or best practices all-in; You need to make a balance, you should profile your application, but not be naive about optimizing your application at some extend. An example of micro-code optimization, without [b][i]profiling first[/i][/b] [b]code not micro-optimized (java):[/b] ... //A random ArrayList of an object ArrayList<AnotherObject> arrayList = new ArrayList<AnotherObject>(100); //A vector we will be using Vector3D utilityVector3D = new Vector3D(0,0,0); for(int i = 0; i = arrayList.size(); i++) { AnotherObject obj = arrayList.get(i); utilitVector3D.x = obj.x; utilitVector3D.x = obj.y; utilitVector3D.x = obj.z; } ... [b]code micro-optimized:[/b] ... //utilityVector3D is not a member of the parent class of the method [b]//--- Comented, instantiated at the constructor Vector3D utilityVector3D = new Vector3D(0,0,0);[/b] //A random ArrayList of an object //--[b]Commented and instanciated too [/b]--ArrayList<AnotherObject> arrayList = new ArrayList<AnotherObject>(100); arrayList.ClearAll(); final int sizeList = arrayList.size(); for(int i = 0; i = sizeList; i++) { final AnotherObject obj = arrayList.get(i); utilitVector3D.x = obj.x; utilitVector3D.x = obj.y; utilitVector3D.x = obj.z; } ... Here you choose to avoid the Garbage collection to happen at the expense of some Memory. My point was that it is good to do some micro-code optimization now and then, but at the same time balance by using simple and robust objects, as my pointed example of the 1 object vs 11 objects above. [b]Am I wrong?[/b] [b]Thanks![/b]
  6. [quote name='frob' timestamp='1346970081' post='4977389'] Basically you summed it up. Language features do have a cost, you need to be aware of those costs. Make it work (first pass development). Make it work well (debug). Then make it work fast (optimize). In that order. You point out in your example that you were able to fit a tiny bit more data into your game. But what is the cost? It takes longer to develop initially, is more difficult to debug, and more time consuming to maintain. You need to know and understand the tradeoff. Is the very slight reduction of gameplay performance worth the cost to develop the software? That's a business decision, but generally the tradeoff is made in favor of faster/cheaper development. For example, virtual functions were scoffed when they were introduced in the 1980s. People (correctly) pointed out their performance cost, and (incorrectly) calculated the performance cost as though every function were virtual. Hopefully it is obvious that it is unwise to make every function virtual because there is overhead (roughly 15ns per function call on current hardware), but that doesn't mean virtual functions are bad. Used properly virtual functions solve a problem and generally offer better performance than trying to write your own solution. Know the cost and use the feature properly. [quote name='rockseller' timestamp='1346948618' post='4977256'] you need to save time by optimizing parts of the code (assuming you have a good code design) by the very beginning, in parts where you do know that you will have a performance boost [/quote] Knuth's saying was that premature optimization is the root of all evil. Wait until you have written it and profiled it before changing it, and make sure you measure afterword to verify your changes improved things. But that doesn't mean you should intentionally write pessimistic code when you know something is performance-intensive. If you know something will be resource heavy you should plan for it accordingly. That is NOT a premature optimization. [/quote] I agree. And I assume you code in C#
  7. It seems like the CACHE gets full. Call webview.clearCache(); and webView2.destroyDrawingCache() now and then.
  8. Good day peeps, I'm going to talk about a project I started, a 2D Game, aimed for Android 2.2 and above, OpenGL ES 2.0, and being coded with the default Android Java SDK (up-to date), rather than the NDK framework. Ever since I started developing a platform RPG game, I took special care of the micro code optimization, because I felt it would have a big impact in the long term, specially because It's serious project, involving help from other designers and creative guys; In terms of performance, the experts say that you should profile your game, and keep measuring it on real devices in order to see where your bottleneck really is. In my experience, and please flame me if you feel I'm wrong, for a time consuming and serious project, this is not 100% true, since you spend time developing tools for other guys to work within your engine framework, and layout the way Bitmaps should be drawn in order to be used as textures (standardizing them), and most of the time you need to save time by optimizing parts of the code (assuming you have a good code design) by the very beginning, in parts where you do know that you will have a performance boost (I.E. reducing the possibilities for the Garbage Collector to run) As a project leader and coder, I have realized that in the end is better to have a robust and well designed Class, rather than an "optimized" all-in class. For instance, I had a class called: Monster That had 100 methods Sure it had a lot of micro optimization inside those methods (good bye readability, I know, good practices, still!!) But after some time, I figured out that iwas better to have a class: Monster With 5 methods, and 3 objects inside MonsterAttackModule MonsterAIModule MonsterBodyModule With the second case, I still have some micro code optimization, more readability, but more objects That's more memory, isn't it? So my point is that in the end is better to have a balance of readability, and a robust OOP Code, micro-code optimize up and there, and profile as experts says, making the original sentence, not completely true, right?
  9. [quote name='sheep19' timestamp='1346925163' post='4977131'] ... I've got another question: As I am not using OpenGL, does it mean that the images I load are stored into main memory (RAM) instead of video memory (VRAM)? If I used OpenGL, would the images be stored in video memory? If yes, I guess that just by using openGL huge (main) memory savings could be made. What about games that are done by professionals? Some games have a lot of images, 3D models etc and they don't have memory problems (?). Are there techniques I should know? Thanks [/quote] I strongly recommend you switching to OpenGL ES 1.0 or 2.0. As for your last questions: Your bitmaps are stored on the RAM, not the VRAM. Your java code runs as compiled ByteCode on the Dalvik Virtual Machine. 1)Every object and variable is stored on the HEAP, which is the memory that the MOBILE has. 2)The only way you can store stuff on the VRAM, that would be by using the existing interface between the CPU an GPU, and that is by a library such as OpenGL ES. OpenGL uses buffers which stores vertices information that can be used for several purposes (drawing), and since you are not using OpenGL, you won't ever touch the VRAM. 3)If you use OpenGL, you don't know how much memory you will save until you profile (test) your game on a certain real device. 4)About the professional games, the best answer I can give you right now is, that Images are stored in a PIXEL format on BUFFERS (Array of numbers) sent to OpenGL using a library, it is send as a texture, once that happens, you can delete any references to the recently created BITMAP, freeing memory from the CPU, and leaving the memory usage to the OpenGL GPU or CPU (don't focus on this right now, VBOs/FBOs). 5) OpenGL might seem hard at first, and it is, but you are smart enough to learn it ;). Just watch some tutorials, and stick to Java.
  10. Good day peeps, I'm going to talk about a project I started, a 2D Game, aimed for Android 2.2 and above, OpenGL ES 2.0, and being coded with the default Android Java SDK (up-to date), rather than the NDK framework. Ever since I started developing a platform RPG game, I took special care of the micro code optimization, because I felt it would have a big impact in the long term, specially because It's a serious project, involving help from other designers and creative guys; [i]In terms of performance, before micro-code-optimizing, the experts say that you should profile your game, and keep measuring it on real devices in order to see where your bottleneck really is.[/i] In my experience, and please flame me if you feel I'm wrong, for a time consuming and serious project, this is not 100% true, since you spend time developing tools for other guys to work within your engine framework, and layout the way Bitmaps should be drawn in order to be used as textures (standardizing them), and most of the time you need to save time by optimizing parts of the code (assuming you have a good code design) by the very beginning, in parts where you do know that you will have a performance boost (I.E. reducing the possibilities for the Garbage Collector to run) As a project leader and coder, I have realized that in the end is better to have a robust and well designed Class, rather than an "optimized" all-in class. For instance, I had a class called: Monster That had 100 methods [i]Sure it had a lot of micro optimization inside those methods (good bye readability, I know, good practices, still!!)[/i] But after some time, I figured out that iwas better to have a class: Monster With 5 methods, and 3 objects inside MonsterAttackModule MonsterAIModule MonsterBodyModule With the second case, I still have some micro code optimization, more readability, but [b]more objects[/b] That's more memory, isn't it? [b]So my point is that in the end is better to have a balance of readability, and a robust OOP Code, micro-code optimize up and there, and profile as experts says, making the original sentence, not completely true, right? [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img][/b] [b]What you guys think[/b]?
  11. Thank you frob, i don't feel alone anymore .
  12. Thank you Katie, very good explanation
  13. I recommend you to try OpenGL ES, it will be way more easy to use GLSurfaceView in the end
  14. Hi there, If my shade Code has many lines of code, even if they are inside an IF() condition that is always going to be FALSE, the performance goes DOWN alot, example: main (){ if( false ){ //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached //lines of code that are never reached } } This shade example it's very slow on Android even though the IF statement never reaches, Is the Shade size a performance issue even though some will never execute?
  15. I don't know about NDK but what I do know is that to get a more accurate response you should be more specific within your question context http://mobile.tutsplus.com/tutorials/android/ndk-tutorial/