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Marscaleb

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About Marscaleb

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  1. Marscaleb

    Main character sprite

    Updated version: tried to blend the best parts between the two. ...I think you're right about the shoes looking better as purple. My next step is basically a massive overhaul of the color, so I'll get to it next.
  2. Marscaleb

    Main character sprite

    I tried re-drawing the sprite completely, using some earlier sketches as a reference. I still don't feel like I've captured the character properly.
  3. Marscaleb

    Main character sprite

    What you did with the left arm helps a LOT.
  4. Marscaleb

    Main character sprite

    Trying to create a sprite for the main character of a platformer. Going for an anime style at about the 16-bit level. Feel free to be open and critical; tear my work apart, draw red lines all over it. Help me understand what I need to fix.
  5. Marscaleb

    How was lighting handled in early 3D games?

    True, but we're talking about the engine. Duke 3D came out three months after Hexen and another four months before Strife, (and barely more than a year after Doom 2,) so it is still competing with the Doom engine, and the Doom engine had plenty of time to incorporate new features (which it did) to keep it relevant. But describing it as "looking better," I will admit, is the wrong way to describe it. Build had rendering abilities that Doom was utterly incapable of, even that modern source ports can't replicate. It's not about it being more technically advanced but that it demonstrates Id tends to focus their engines on being solid over dynamic.
  6. Marscaleb

    How was lighting handled in early 3D games?

    I know, right? I recall a lot areas (particularly in the multiplayer maps) where the lighting just didn't make any sense, and I wonder if they actually painted the lighting values in by hand. Honestly, it's not completely unreasonable, since most areas have fairly consistent lighting. With such little lighting detail, painting lighting values by hand sounds like it would be easier than programming an extensive lighting computation system. Was this something that people actually did back in the day? Unreal may have been a little more glitchy but it still looked better. Come to think of it, that's really always been the norm. Compare the Doom engine to the Build engine; Id's product was more stable and firm but Id's competition looked better because it could do a little more. Hearing stories like that is why I love asking questions on this site. I love hearing about all these really-used in-the-trenches tricks. Also, I didn't even think about using a lower bit-depth for the lighting data. That makes a lot of sense too! Plus, even Quake 2 did that, sort of. I remember now reading about how for the software renderer it took the brightest value from the RGB channels and used that. Plus the lighting data was stored (or maybe just processed? Can't recall exactly) the lighting data in just a little lower bit-depth than what it displayed.
  7. When I was younger, I basically looked at some of the big title like Quake and Unreal and thought that they represented basically how all video games worked. In recent years I've come to understand that I was wrong in those assumptions. One particular thing that I was thinking about today was lighting. In Quake and Unreal a developer would place lights in the scene and calculate the lighting, and then bake that data into the scene as lightmaps. I thought that was how all 3D engines worked, just with calculations that didn't look as good. But now I'm looking at several old games and noticing... I don't think that's how they work. A few particular titles I'm looking at are ones on the Nintendo 64; Goldeneye, Turok 2, Perfect Dark. But when I notice the lighting in these games they don't tend to have the same fading and fall-off I see from Unreal and Quake 2. In fact, in Goldeneye the lighting is usually at a constant level, except for dark spots that might as well have been hand-painted. And it occurs to me that if that's the lighting in your game, then trying to compute lighting and saving that data as a lightmap is an abhorrent waste of space. But if it wasn't lightmap data, then how was the lighting handled? How was lighting handled in these early 3D games? What was used to figure out where there were shadows and where there was not?
  8. There is a particular style of art that I would like to use in my games, but I can't manage to pull off. Here's a really good sample of what I want to be able to do: https://orig00.deviantart.net/4955/f/2010/098/8/c/texture_by_torbak.jpg It's a hand-painted style, somewhat cartoonish but still containing detail. But my attempts to paint such a texture result in a lot of solid-color blobs. I can't ever seem to convey shape without drawing an outline. I know I can't expect this to be "easy" but I can't ever quite get a grasp on what I need to do to my drawings to get them to look right. I feel as if I am missing out on some sort of technique or tool, or maybe some sort of fundamental understanding. I would greatly appreciate it if anyone knew of a good tutorial I could follow so that I could practice these skills.
  9. I'm trying to recall a game I once played with some friends, but I can't recall enough to find it with some google searches. I'm hoping someone here might recognize it. First of all, I'm fairly certain we played this on either the original Xbox or the Gamecube. It had a typical high fantasy setting. It had multiplayer; I recall that we were all sitting on the couch playing together. I'm fairly sure it was a dungeon crawler, a hack-and-slash. What I remember was that I created a character who was a halfling, and the default name that the game suggested I name my character was "Ryngs," an obvious homage to Lord of the Rings. I remember that I just changed the name to "Pyng" because while changing the name we laughed at the Mulan reference just say "My name is Ping." But I only played it a few minutes, so I really can't recall much else. Does this jog anyone's memory?
  10. Marscaleb

    What game was this? FPS, low poly

    Those two are like my two most favorite shooters of all time.
  11. Marscaleb

    Character design (2D Platformer)

    Well the final images were drawn in inkscape and then tweaked in GIMP. The actual designing was done on paper. Just kept drawing them over and over again until i got a design I liked.
  12. Marscaleb

    What game was this? FPS, low poly

    Ah! I think I found it! ...Mostly. The game it appears to be is "Gore: Ultimate Soldier" Or rather, "Gore: Special Edition" which was release as Free-to-Play some years back as a free and updated version of the original. Just about everything connects right. I remember the same few thugs that repeated as your many enemies, especially that big guy wearing orange and a vest. The first level is actually a training level, so if we ignore that, then the next level is the one I described as the the first level, and the third is the second level where you were on tops of skyscrapers. That level in particular is what I remember of the "second level," and when I dug through my old PC I found that's the level where my last save file was. There's only one thing that still bugs me. The "first level" (actually the second) is NOT what I was remembering; what I was thinking of. This would be easy to write off as just a detail I had wrong, but this really bugs me because that level I see in my head is what got me thinking about this in the first place. A couple weeks back I was thinking of settings for FPS games, and when I thought of modern-ish settings, this particular level popped into my head. And I wanted to go back and revisit it. But when I looked it up in YouTube videos, and when I played it again just now, everything fell into place except for that one level whose memory sparked the entire motivation to revisit this old game. This leaves me in a state that I don't think anyone can help me. What was the level I was thinking of? Did I actually grab that from another memory of playing another game? Did my mind just warp it somehow into something completely different? Was there a secret alternate version that I had somehow unlocked when I first played it, but didn't when playing it just now? (That's actually a neat idea, actually.) Or was there some update where they revised that level? (The one I see in my mind's eye was in fact a less well-designed level.) I don't know how I could share what I see in my mind apart from drawing some intricate detailed picture, which quite honestly I don't think would be worth my time. Here's a super quick drawing though. I remember this part where I was running around outside between buildings. There was one segment where you just around this one building (purple path) but you could alternatively go around the other side and then through the building (raspberry dotted path.) Through the building wasn't very intricate, I think it was just a path through a hallway. The reason I remember this one segment is because when I got to where the two paths meet, I noticed I could go through the building, and when I did I found that it just led me back to where I was, so I guess I went backwards through an alternate path. It's not much, but beyond that I'd have to draw out detailed pictures. I remember there being a vending machine, a light post, some grass... really generic stuff. But like I said, everything is definitely Gore. The thugs, the setting, and the level after this one, all totally that game. Well, thank you all for the help! Heh, I remember once seeing some site that would guess what TV show or movie you were thinking of. It would just ask you a series of yes or no questions to narrow down what it could be. It would first just ask if you were thinking of a movie or a TV show. The next question for the TV show was "Does it take place in a city?" It was actually a user-updated database. If if failed to guess the one you were thinking of, you were supposed to add your own question that would separate the show it guessed and the one you were thinking of. You could adapt that same process to video games, and/or adapt it to help people find a given game too, I suppose.
  13. Marscaleb

    What game was this? FPS, low poly

    I'd forgotten about that one. I remember playing that one back in the day. Man I gotta find a copy of it again. But no, that's not the game I'm trying to think of. Certainly fits the description I gave, but not the one I was thinking of. I'm starting to wonder if this was something particularly obscure, like they tried to self-publish it on the internet way back before there was Steam or anything, which is why no one has heard of it. Or maybe it was a mod or a TC some group made. (But I doubt its a mod, I don't play enough mods to have forgotten one as extensive as that would have to have been.)
  14. Marscaleb

    What game was this? FPS, low poly

    Kingpin: That certainly hits all the marks I described, but that's not the game I was thinking of. If not for the excessive foul language, I think I would love to play that game. Riddick: I can't find any videos of that that look old enough to be what I was thinking of. Urban Chaos: Wow, that game looks classic! But no, that's not it either. COD/MOH: I am absolutely certain it wasn't any historical war game. Unless one of those games did something more modern and fictional prior to the release of Modern Warfare, I would write off those games.
  15. There is a game I played once that I am trying to track down, but I can't recall what it was called. I'm hoping if I can describe it adequately someone might recognize it. The game was a first person shooter. I believe I played it on a PC. It had a modern setting in an urban environment. (Or at least nearly modern; it wouldn't surprise me if it actually took place in the future, but it wasn't "space future on an alien world," you played in a modern-looking urban city.) Visually the game looked rather old or low-poly, like it might have been built with the Quake 2 engine. I can't recall distinctly though, so I wouldn't exclude anything that looks like it could run on a PS2. But I'm pretty sure you could see things like street lamps and guard rails with distinct polygon edges instead looking relatively round. I'm quite sure this was before normal maps were used in games. What I recall most distinctly about it was that it had a surprisingly high amount of audio clips. At least, compared to what I expected given it's visuals. I think there were two character models for the thugs you were fighting, which is kind of what you would expect for a game of that era, but I could play through the level twice and still hear new voice clips from them. I think in the first level you were on the ground level, and then the second level you were on the tops of some skyscrapers. I think the levels I played were pretty linear, but I also recall there was at least one point in the first level where you could take a different path by cutting through a building, although it connected back with the main path. And finally, although I could be completely wrong about this, I have this vague feeling that the game was released for free, like the guys who made it decided to release it for free on its five or ten year anniversary. Mostly I think it was released for free because I can't quite imagine how else I was playing it, because I would have remembered if I payed money for it, and I just don't think it was a demo. But I could be wrong, so don't hold me to that. I know this isn't much detail to go on, but I'm hoping it's enough to jog someone's memory. There can't have been too many shooters from that era that opened in a modern city. (And no, it wasn't Sin. I am familiar with that game.)
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