TheChubu

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About TheChubu

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  1. OpenGL So I made a styling language for OpenGL Apps

    To be fair the situation of UI libs for Java that can be used in games is pretty annoying right now. You have stuff like TWL, which sounds cool and all but it has its own renderer, based on GL 1.1 of all things, and you'd have to code one for it if you ever want to use it on say, a core GL context or Vulkan. Of course, if you use core GL or Vulkan, it is going to be a total pain because the whole lib has the ideas of vertex3f, color3f and friends very ingrained in it, which doesn't maps at all to a modern solution. There is NiftyGUI, which is, again, pretty cool and all but again, it insists on rendering itself, which causes problems integrating it into an existing pipeline, since all state tracking you make goes out of the window when you pass the wheel to NiftyGUI. On the good side, it does has a core GL backend. But as you can see the whole concept of "UI rendering itself" is not good. You have various backends in NiftyGUI: Compat ones, core ones, LWJGL ones, JOGL ones, etc. And thats the rendering part, there is also input handling, which it is also a pain to incorporate into an existing pipeline (and IIRC it tries to do sound too, it's big and messy). LWJGL did, in my opinion, the most sane thing and incorporated bindings for Nuklear, which it can be quite a pain in the ass since it is an immediate UI lib (which gets pretty annoying when doing more complex UIs) and the only documentation is in the source code, and it flat out stops after you scrolled through 1/4 of it. On the other hand, the big, big plus of Nuklear is that it knows jack shit of what you're running on. You can use GL, Vulkan, D3D, some abstraction layer like GLFW or SDL for input, or just polling win32 events, it doesn't matters. It provides a tiny API in which you pass input events to it, and it generates memory chunks with vertices to draw for you, that you send to your rendering pipeline however and whenever you want. Integration becomes **super** easy this way. You can draw right away immediate style, or VAO/VBO core style, or deffer for later, or whatever. Your call. So in my opinion, if you offer something that can be easily integrated like Nuklear, and and the same time being easier to use (since it'd be entirely Java side), you could have an audience for this stuff. EDIT: As a side note, using any of the standard libs like Swing or JavaFX with a GL app is also a pain in the butt because the implementations usually depend on big ass non portable hacks to make it work, like the render target hijacking method in JavaFX, or the mandatory compat profile GLCanvas for SWT. And performance just plain sucks in these cases.
  2. C++ Random number issue

    I'm guessing what you want is this: static std::uniform_int_distribution<int> u(1, 6); // Seed the engine only *once* static std::default_random_engine e(time(0)); int roll = (u(e)); return roll; ie, you want to initialize the engine with a seed **once**. And let it generate random values from there. Might be wrong syntax for that though, I don't know if std::default_random_engine has a constructor where you can pass it a seed value. Someone with more C++ experience can tell you how to do that properly. EDIT: Nvm, it's fine. The seed in that case will be the current time of the system. So it should vary enough across playthroughs to be useful. If you take out the seed, what happens is that the generator gets initialized with a default seed every single time, and these random number generators are deterministic. ie, if you seed it with the same number, they'll produce the same sequence of values. That's pretty useful because it allows you to reproduce them if you keep around the seed that originated them.
  3. Need guidance for first game

    In my not-so-experienced-in-finishing-2d-game-projects opinion, Unreal Engine is overkill for what you're doing. Game Maker Studio 2 sounds like a good idea. You could try out free/open source 2D game engines before though: Godot Engine https://godotengine.org/ Torque2D https://www.garagegames.com/products/torque-2d CoronaSDK https://coronalabs.com/ Cocos2D-x http://www.cocos2d-x.org/
  4. Said every regular idea guy ever.
  5. Is Phil Fish a Jerk?

    Eh, I'd have done exactly the same with my 15min of fame. Get invited to a con, and tell a japanese dev their games suck. Now I'll have to think of something else...
  6. Culling cone frustum

    Have you searched for cone-box, cone-sphere and cone-plane intersection? Those ought to be enough to code some culling. It's a regular cone, the hard part of the usual frustum is that it has tons of planes, so you need to do intersection with each, but a cone is a more basic shape so there are equations to test directly for it.
  7. xaudio obviously isn't multi platform, if that's what you're asking. It works on Xbox (afaik), Windows, and that's it. You could try https://www.fmod.com/ with an indie licence. Anyway, whatever audio lib you use, it'll probably work on top of the native audio layer of the OS. Say, OpenAL Soft will work on top of ALSA/PulseAudio on Linux, WASAPI/DirectSound (or whatever else they have) on Windows, and so on. So if you go below OpenAL level, you get into platform specific code.
  8. Mobile Game Studio XP = "lndustry"?

    Mobile market is a huge part of the video game industry right now (biggest maybe?), so I'd say yeah, it is.
  9. How to protect yourself and your game?

    Any kind of business endeavor works like that. You implicitly depend on that all the people involved aren't insane. That it wont turn out that the "John Williams from DC" artist guy you contracted is actually Juan Carlos Lee, who lives in Mongolia taking care of sheeps, and has been selling what whatever he was making for you to multiple people at the same time behind your back for two years. Or that the sound effect gal you hired isn't actually just stealing other people's sounds and slightly tweaking them when you ask her to do so because they don't sound appropriate for your game. Everything is a gamble. You can just make some efforts to make your fall softer if it comes to it.
  10. Creating a custom window UI on windows10

    I'm looking at what you linked but I have no idea what I am looking at.
  11. How to protect yourself and your game?

    Geez, the point was that you can't do that much. You can make them sign stuff, you could try your luck filling DMCA requests to the sites where they uploaded your stuff, but there are no guarantees. If you contract someone who lives on a dirt house in the outskirts of Cairo, good luck trying to enforce your contract clauses there. The best thing you can do is to try to research who you contract. People with long portfolios and a extensive list of published things will be a safer bet, but they wont be cheap. You could try to luck out with a newbie that looks that has talent, but you can't guarantee he/she wont screw you over.
  12. 2D PreLoad of texture in vb6

    For VB6 and D3D8? Yeah, just do the following: Don't.
  13. Converting My Flash Games To HTML5

    Eh, if you search for any of them you find out that Swiffy is from Google, Shumway is from Mozilla, and Haxe is a whole language/platform started in 2005 with a couple current popular game development frameworks (OpenFL, HaxeFlixel, etc). So I dunno where you got the idea any of them aren't "legit". Also as what to use. Shumway doesn't converts anything apparently, it's just a SWF renderer. Swiffy was a converter web service that Google shut down in 2016 (closed source). And with anything else well, you'll have to reimplement your stuff in another technology. Haxe can compile to ActionScript, maybe it can go the other way around? That's what I figured it out after 3min of Googling those names, I suggest you try the same.
  14. Material Design in Games?

    Games usually have UIs that match the game theme. Material design might not work well for a steampunk game, or a farm game, and so on. For instance, Deus Ex has its whole UI built around triangles, gold, black and white. You put material design on it and it looks very out of place. You grab something like a medieval fantasy game and you get these ornamented borders on menus, metal or wooden surfaces, etc. The only example I can think of right now of non-orthodox "game theme matches UI theme" is Skyrim. It's menus are quite modern with transparent surfaces, sharp borders and highlights, kinda material'y if you wish. Still you can see details here and there with the ornamentation I described (line drawing mostly). That UI doesn't screams "medieval fantasy" precisely, but look at ornamented borders. It's like "modern" medieval fantasy. It was really interesting for me when Skyrim came out. Look at Deus Ex Mankind Divided's Looks futuristic, preserving the gold, black and white colors of the overall theme of the game (hell, in Human Revolution they had a friggin golden post process throughout the whole game). Diablo 2's UI You get these very ornamented gold/silver metal thingies everywhere. In short, I don't think you'll find examples of material design in game UIs unless you see cartoony games, ie, something that has a tone that would match the usual material design colors and shapes.