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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Astr0

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  1. Hey If you look at todays AAA games like Starcraft, Warhammer 40k, League of Legends and so on, they all have very similar multiplayer functionalities. Where the main functionalities I suppose is being able to host/join games, chat and the matchmaking system. If you wanted to create something similar, a multiplayer system for a 3D game that lives up to the AAA games standards multiplayer. How advanced and how big of a project is this? For example, would 2 above average skilled network game programmers be able to create this in 1 years time?
  2. Hey Some big MMORPG games like World of Warcraft has a lot of, i suppose illegal, Private Servers that people play on for various reasons, for example to play for free. But Im wondering how does that really works? How are they able to host and modify games they shoudn't be able to access? Do they somehow hack to access the source code of the game? Because I suppose building the game from scratch themselves is a bit too ambitious... Hope this thread doesn't violate any rules as Im just curious on how this can be possible [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
  3. [quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1348403641' post='4982894'] In any game, motion capture is always just a [i]starting point[/i] for animators anyway -- the data is always very noise and needs to be cleaned up, and then tweaked, and further animated by hand. It's not a full solution, just a time-saving tool. [/quote] [quote name='SimonForsman' timestamp='1348399240' post='4982878'] [quote name='Astr0' timestamp='1348398909' post='4982877'] For those studios who don't use motion capture. How are they able to create such smooth and realistic movements? [/quote] Not all AAA games have characters that need realistic animations and it is entierly possible to make realistic animations by hand. [/quote] I posted another thread earlier (http://www.gamedev.net/topic/631482-animations-in-good-and-bad-games/). The answer i got there was this: "Animation is a vast domain with not a lot of focus put into it, it's often a sidenote to rendering or AI. For example, there isn't even an animation specific forum on gamedev, which I find odd. I've worked on animation as a programmer for a few years now on a couple of AAA titles, and I think that it would be VERY hard (maybe not impossible) for a 10 man team to compete with the big boys for the following reasons: -Access to motion capture: Without access to motion capture or without a pipeline to process motion captured data into a game usable format, animators will have to hand code their animations which is painstaking. Even then, it's hard to capture subtle, realistic movements by hand. Big inhuman movements (i.e. a dragon flying spewing fire) are more forgiving. -Animation tools: big studios have sophisticated animation solutions that have been built up over time and can be shared across games with tons of animation assets that can be re-used. -Manpower: 10 people for an entire game is probably slightly bigger than the size of a dedicated animation team for a AAA title. There is likely one or two people dedicated to animation at most on a 10 man team, and even then they are likely split between AI and animation work (or perhaps even more domains). For smaller teams to be able to compete with bigger teams, you need better people, which can happen, but it is probably the exception rather than the rule. Even big games often get lazy with animation. The Elder Scrolls titles look decent from a first person perspective, but switching to 3rd person view, you can see how terrible the locomotion of the player's avatar is. The reason this is ok is that few people actually play from this view, so it makes sense to not spend too much time or money on that particular feature when the visible characters can be constrained to always move in ways that look good." This makes me a bit confused having received different answers.
  4. Hey Let's say you found a game studio which has a game with the exact type of multiplayer functionalities that you want for your own game. Games like starcraft, league of legends and most of the strategy games now a days tend to have a similar hosting, matchmaking and ladder system. If your looking to keep your own production costs down, could it be a good idea to license or buy the multiplayer part of an existing game? I might be completely off here as my programming skills is very limited.
  5. [quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1348398095' post='4982874'] Moving you to our Visual Arts forum. Yes, some AAA games use motion capture, but not all of them do. [/quote] For those studios who don't use motion capture. How are they able to create such smooth and realistic movements?
  6. Hey Do MMORPG fantasy AAA games like World of Warcraft and Guild Wars use motion capture to create their character animations for movement, spells and abilities? Also im wondering, do anyone have any idea what the software and equipment to start using motion capture costs?
  7. Hello You always read about the big patent fights between software/hardware companies like Apple and Samsung. But what about patents in the games industry? What are you able to actually take a patent on here? And if your about to create a hopefully commercially successfull game, could other companies patent actually be a problem? I live in Europe and if im not misstaken its illegal to patent software here, while as in the states its legal. Also, is there any good threads or articles on this?
  8. Hello Let me begin to say that im new to game development, but I have a question that Ive been thinking about for a while. If you look at big games like Call of duty, World of Warcraft and Assassins Creed etc. All of those games have really good and smooth character animations and effects when your fighting (using spells, abilities and movements during combat). I play a lot of action games, including indie games. But one thing that really seperates the good from the bad games is the way your character fights and moves. I would never have guessed that the effects and animations of fighting would be one of the more difficult or more demanding part of the game development? For example: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8z-5xgkBi8[/media] Mortal Online is a MMORPG and they had a budget of about 1 million USD and about 10 employees working on the game. But the animations and effects when your fighting is really bad, just like 100s of other action indie games i played. I recognize that time is a problem for indie productions. But not even the most basic anmiations and effects like swinging a sword comes close in quality to the big titles. Shouldnt a good animator/(effect artist?) be able to quite easily make the same animation that for example World of Warcraft has when their characters are swinging a sword? Based on the 100s of games i played it doesn't seem like it, but why?