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PHMitrious

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  1. [quote name='hplus0603' timestamp='1348594358' post='4983654'] In a typical game, you load the same data on client and server sides, but you "stub out" the graphics-related subsystems on the server, so they don't actually load/keep the graphics data in memory, and the server doesn't actually spend time rendering. A good way of stubbing is to use dependency injection. In C++, this is done through pure abstract base classes; in Java, it's done through interfaces; etc. I think you absolutely want to have the "physics" data on the clients, too, so that you can give proper UI cues when the client tries to give commands that would walk through a wall or whatever. If the server generates "secret" data (like the hand of cards in poker) then that should not be sent to the clients until they are supposed to see the data. This may include things like the actual presence of randomly-spawned mobs, for example. However, the location of spawn points and percent chance of spawning ("map data") that may only be useful on the server, can be loaded on the client without ill effect, if it makes the data format and code simpler. It'll just do nothing on the client. [/quote] Before anything thanks to the three of you, I'm just quoting the most "complete" answer. Well, I've trying to do something like what you said, for example I'm designing my maps in a way I will be able to ignore the graphics related part completely when I'm loading it on the server, and you guys pretty much helped with some stuff I was dubious about. And about the info about spawning stuff and all I'm designing it in a way that I won't have to worry about it on the client side, I will just have to worry about a monster when it's actually there, not before it.
  2. Well, I will try to make this question simple, if I don't make myself clear, please tell me and I shall edit this post. I'm putting together a team and we are working on a online game, a sort of 2D RPG/ACTION thing, not too sophisticated at first, but we do have experience with doing this kind of stuff on offline gaming, so I'm familiar with AI, collision detection etc of a 2D game. Well, I've been researching and reading on networking and client/server design, but have some questions on what's been on my mind (I've been discussing this with the rest of the guys as well) and I'd like some opinions on some stuff: Maps: Well I'll have a graphical representation of this part of the game on the game client and all, but on the server I will only need a "physical" representation of this, right? Like I will only have to store what is relevant to collision detection, interaction, event activation and what not. And you guys think I should also keep the basic physical info on the client too, for example for avoiding that the player runs through a wall because of a delay on the packet delivery? What are your thoughts on these two maps representations server and client? (I already have a working graphical map engine, still needing some work, but working nonetheless) Players: I will have to give info on the appearance of the player to the client and all so it can load everything, but that's not where I have more doubts. On the client side I'm thinking about the same kinda thing as for the map, just a physical representation of the player, where it is and all, and sending via packets it's moving vectors, it's actions codes and the results of actions, like damage just received and all, stuff like that, but I would really love some opinions on the design for the server side representation of the player. For the client side I will have the graphical representation and the animations stored, which shall be activated through the codes that come in the packets. Well I think monsters and npcs design would come from What I have from the player, even tho for now I'd like to get a map with a player working before I advance on doing stuff. So I think that's my question for now, but anything you want to comment/ask is welcome.
  3. Well, I'm starting a project to create a 2D online RPG. Technologies: I will be using C++ and Python (maybe some other stuff for tools, but mainly these for the game itself), I'm considering using SFML as an API to access some things and for taking care of windows for me, I will be developing this game for windows mainly, but intend to make it multi-plataform once I have some nice amount of stuff done. I'm not going to be working on this project alone I will have people to help me on networking, fore example, with more experience than me in this field. I also have people to help me with providing assets for the game - game artists. A little background on my knowledge: I have been programming in C++ for a few years and have a good understanding of the language as well as some experience with developing software in it; As for game programming I have used XNA to make a strategy/platform game with a few friends last year, it was a fairly big project for us, which gave me some nice experience regarding game programming, I have also some experience with creating smaller games using Allegro 5 and C++, I even created a basic OOP game structure and interface to speed up development of small games, which gave me some better understanding on how to manage game loops and where to put everything. After all that I also had a few months of experience with Direct3D, didn't make anything really big with it though, but it was useful to understand how graphics work a little better. So, I'm here to get some ideas, and some other points of view on what I have so far regarding what to use for the game: I think that SFML will provide me with what I need in terms of performance, any opinions on it? I'm not sure whether to use what SFML gives me by default regarding rendering for 2D graphics, what do you guys think ? I know I can use OpenGL, and I'm not afraid to use it or anything, I just want to know if it's worth to use it for this project will it have a huge effect on this matter or is the SFML API "enoughly" optimized for 2D graphics? If it is I have thought about extending the sprite class using a pre-render sort of approach enabling using multiple textures and rectangles for any animated sprites I make (for example) and for tilesheets and things like that using a similar approach, any views on that? I would like to know how good the networking API provided by SFML is, can anyone with a little experience with it give me some feedback on it? Well, for now I think that's all, thanks
  4. Well, I'm starting a project to create a 2D online RPG. Technologies: I will be using C++ and Python (maybe some other stuff for tools, but mainly these for the game itself), I'm considering using SFML as an API to access some things and for taking care of windows for me, I will be developing this game for windows mainly, but intend to make it multi-plataform once I have some nice amount of stuff done. I'm not going to be working on this project alone I will have people to help me on networking, fore example, with more experience than me in this field. I also have people to help me with providing assets for the game - game artists. A little background on my knowledge: I have been programming in C++ for a few years and have a good understanding of the language as well as some experience with developing software in it; As for game programming I have used XNA to make a strategy/platform game with a few friends last year, it was a fairly big project for us, which gave me some nice experience regarding game programming, I have also some experience with creating smaller games using Allegro 5 and C++, I even created a basic OOP game structure and interface to speed up development of small games, which gave me some better understanding on how to manage game loops and where to put everything. After all that I also had a few months of experience with Direct3D, didn't make anything really big with it though, but it was useful to understand how graphics work a little better. So, I'm here to get some ideas, and some other points of view on what I have so far regarding what to use for the game: I think that SFML will provide me with what I need in terms of performance, any opinions on it? I'm not sure whether to use what SFML gives me by default regarding rendering for 2D graphics, what do you guys think ? I know I can use OpenGL, and I'm not afraid to use it or anything, I just want to know if it's worth to use it for this project will it have a huge effect on this matter or is the SFML API "enoughly" optimized for 2D graphics? If it is I have thought about extending the sprite class using a pre-render sort of approach enabling using multiple textures and rectangles for any animated sprites I make (for example) and for tilesheets and things like that using a similar approach, any views on that? I would like to know how good the networking API provided by SFML is, can anyone with a little experience with it give me some feedback on it? Well, for now I think that's all, thanks