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KnolanCross

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  1.   thanks for replying 1. Let's just say i don't have much experience. 2. if u say so. what is ur recommended genre for a beginner like me?   fyi: my assigned teacher have more experience to the website than to game. But, we really want to make a game. so, we decide to do browser game.     1) If you have a lot of time until the deadline, make a very simple game first (Tic Tac Toe and Snake are the classics), so you can grasp how long it will take to make some of the things such as UI, human interface, drawing a sprite on the screen, etc. If you don't just keep the game as simple as possible, gather ALL the assets you need before you start, as you won't have time to create them yourself.   2) All depends on the time and assets you have access to. I personally think that tower defense and infinite runners are the easiest games to make and have a fun game experience.
  2.   What is your experience with game development, coding, art, etc?   If you don't have much experience, maybe a RTS is not the right game for you, it requires loads of assets and a decent AI to have a playable game.   Also, any reason why you are not using an engine? There are plenty out there: https://html5gameengine.com Any reason why you are not aiming desktop? It is much more mature and more likely that you will find help when you have some trouble.   My advice is to plan a very simple example, say a first mission, then think of all the assets you need (graphics, animations, etc), all the coding (pathfinding, AI, controllers, etc), music effects and then weight against your knowledge, resources (opengameart is a great place to start) and time and see if it feasible.
  3.   Personally I like Flask better, specially for a small project. Flask is much simpler and actually designed for smaller projects. If you like this idea, you can use for the login this module: https://flask-login.readthedocs.io/en/latest/ As for the  database, if you want to go really simple, you can use sqlite. It is very, very simple and you can use from scratch (comes with python by default). Regardless of the database you pick, you can use SQLAlchemy as ORM: http://flask-sqlalchemy.pocoo.org/2.1/ with the advantage that you can change the database you use with no changes to your code.
  4.   That will vary from company to company, they will put it on their requirements. The main problem you will face is that there are many people that want to be gamedevs, but then go to work on some other industry (mostly with web development). After a few years they get fed up and try to go to the game industry, and they will go for the junior jobs, but they have many years of experience coding.   If I were you I would try to get one polished game finished, not only it will teach you a lot about gamedev and coding, but it would also be a great addition to your resumé.
  5. Well, your idea is a bit crude to be honest.   The first thing that you don't really seems to be 100% sure how you want to handle special attacks. Yes, the special attacks on SoM are incredibly slow, specially when you want to use a high level attack (charge to 100% 8 times? really?), so I would say that the the SD3 approach is much better, I would go with that.   I also think you could add some gameplay to the special gauge, for instance some character could gain a bonus gauge when it hits a critical hit, one of the saber spells could add bonus gauge and, finally, a tanky char could earn points by getting hit.   As for spells, I don't really know how to handle it. When I played I had two problems, MP is boring and spells are either too powerful or too weak. In a quick brainstorm the only idea I could come with was that stronger spells (such as saint beam) should require gauge to consume, while weaker ones could be spamed.   Finally, a free for all weapon choices is great on paper, but it is far too much work and very small reward. Specially because in the end, one weapon will be better than others and people will simply ignore all the work you put on the other weapons. If you really want, focus two or three play styles per class. You could take a look on Soma bringer, they handled it quite well IMO.
  6. Since this topic got over 400 views, no answer and the only thing google tell me about APA is a scientific citation style, I am going to be the first one to admit that I have no idea of what you are talking about.   Could you further describe what you need and maybe give an example?
  7.   The short answer is: use snprintf (notice the 'n' threre).   Where you have: printf(Name, "%i", Counter); Change to: snprintf(Name, 64, "%i", Counter); The long answer is: printf is used to write on the stdout, and on stdout only. The reason you are not having any error messages is because it will receive a formated string and any number of arguments. When you use: printf(Name, "%i", Counter); The compiler will assume that Name is a formatted string such as "Hello %i", and the following arguments will be used to format the percent marked points in your string, since the compiler doesn't know the contents of the variable Name it will assume that you know what you are doing and leave no warnings or errors. When your code is executed, Name is empty and it will print an empty string and ignore the "%i" and Counter variables.   The compiler is complaining about sprintf because it is indeed unsafe. If you try to write 80 bytes on the Name variable, it will not check the actual size and it will write outside it bounds, which will likely end up crashing your program sooner or later (in my experience, later, on another malloc).   On the other hand, snprintf will use the second argument as the size of the buffer and will not write more than n bytes (or n -1, depends on the implementation) on it, hence it is considered safe.   Here is the documentation for snprintf: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2ts7cx93.aspx   PS: you should free the Name variable after you send it, or use char Name[64] instead.
  8. Some bad smells I found looking at your code (I am a linux programer, so take what I say with a grain of salt).   First, why are you creating one thread for each socket? You can use select or poll to watch for multiple sockets, it will lead to a much simpler code.   Second, on the server code, are those printfs correct? Is there any redefinition of it for windows that I am not aware about? Because I am pretty sure you should be using sprintf  there instead (or even better, snprintf).   Finally, some of your "send" commands are with constant 64 size, when the buffers are not 64 bytes long, you should definitely fix this.
  9. Honestly, drop the american white guilt.   Study the cultures, learn what you can and make the system based on what you learned. You are not making a fantasy RPG based on the history of a country and RPG fans will look for great writing and great game mechanics, not a 100% precise cultural demonstration. I have seen some elements from my culture in a few games and never gave a fuck if they were precise or not.   If my word is not enough, learn from the most successful RPG series of the world, Final Fantasy. It was made by a Japanese team and their settings, spell and weapons take a little from several places in the world, not only Japan. People don't love their games because Shiva is a great representation of the Indian culture.
  10.   I guess I didn't explain it very clearly, my bad.   What I meant is: how do you define who will an enemy attack? For instance, my party is ordered: Freyja Bam Mishima Phenez   Is there the same chance of each of them being hit in a battle? Is there some distribution (for instance Freyja 50% of the attacks, Bam 30%, Mishima 15%, and Phenez 5%)? Or is there an aggro variable (ie Freyja made more damage so far, so it is more likely to be attacked). Each enemy type will have their own preferences, so some will attack randomly, some will have specific criteria as to who to attack and why, and then some will be a mix of both of those (sometimes attacking randomly and sometimes choosing who to attack based on some criteria). The criteria can also be different between enemy types as well. Since there are different types of enemies from different environments with different abilities, the will each have their own battle styles. This will hopefully keep the battles more interesting throughout the game. And thank you for your feedback regarding the music, I appreciate it! And Ragnarok Online is one of my all time fav game soundtracks :)   Instead of double posting, here's a new pic of inside the viking houses where the race of cats live.       No problem, I can see you put a lot of effort in the game and it is always fun to talk about game design.   Your aggro system can make sense, I can imagine a dog like enemy attacking the cat more often :wink:   BTW, I laughed at the wool balls. I would add some scratches to the walls, it also would be hilarious if at the inn of the village you put a bathtub and next to it a sandbox.
  11.   I guess I didn't explain it very clearly, my bad.   What I meant is: how do you define who will an enemy attack? For instance, my party is ordered: Freyja Bam Mishima Phenez   Is there the same chance of each of them being hit in a battle? Is there some distribution (for instance Freyja 50% of the attacks, Bam 30%, Mishima 15%, and Phenez 5%)? Or is there an aggro variable (ie Freyja made more damage so far, so it is more likely to be attacked).   EDIT: I heard the songs, here are my thoughts (keep in mind I have 0 musical talent):   Broderskap - I really liked this one. It has a peaceful countryside touch to it. Ceratainly zone material. Definitely my favorite of the set. Battle in the sewers - I think a battle song needs to be more agitated. IMO battle songs need to make my blood boil. It is by no means a bad song, it reminds me of the robot factory of Chrono Trigger. A barren wasteland - I liked that one, but I think it is one for a short event only (for instance, if you played tales of phantasia, the moment that Mint and Cless enter the portal), but it is too repetitive to be a zone song. Speedtesters at your service - liked it, very sonic like IMO. Dark sewer: dark indeed, I liked it. Six Six Five: I found the start a bit too similar with the Dark Sewer, the effect that starts at about 3:15 is also a bit out of touch. Other than that I liked it a lot, it has a bit of underwater theme. It took me back to Bialan Island on Ragnarok online:     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FC6YgBKc6o Lost in a blizzard: pretty much the same of "a barren wasteland". Sleep tight: starts a bit like a sad theme and evolves to a rap like song. I liked it, seems to fit a cyberpunk city.
  12. If you need to use a regexp, I believe the regexp you are looking for is:   "^[ ~\\^>]*([A-Z]*)[ ~\\^>]*([A-Z]*)[ ~\\^>]*([A-Z]*)[ ~\\^>]*([A-Z]*).*$"   When you need to test regexps I would recommend: https://www.debuggex.com/
  13. Congratulations on the game, it has a bit of an earthbound feeling, though it does seem a bit childish. When you refer to the battle system, you mean you fight with a single character or the whole party? I would like to hear how you handled aggro, it is the one thing that I hate about turn based rpgs (not being able to control who gets hit).
  14.   I use orx (http://orx-project.org/), but it has a huge learning curve and few tools available.   I personally don't like Unity3D, because I don't like the way you use it, I would rather control everything via code. That being said, if you don't have any problem with it, it is probably your best bet as it is the most popular one between indies meaning it has a lot of resources and docs.
  15. Either McGrane solution or, if your engine allows, simply use the actual 3D coord, it will save you a big headache and there are many 2D engines that allow it.   PS: There is http://overlap2d.com/ for level editing as well.