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JustABegineer

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  1. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiFyFrAmW1w[/media] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRD4llFxOzA&feature=plcp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eewX3uhCNkQ&feature=plcp [b]It looks amazing. Does anybody know which game engine, project is it? Also we can discuss about techniques used in this project (lighting, shaders, effects etc.)/[/b]
  2. [quote name='markrodgers11' timestamp='1349582341' post='4987580'] probably getting ahead of myself again. but is it possible to code something in DirectX9, DirectX10, AND DirectX11? I'm just asking this because I'm wondering how pro game dev teams create games that could be run under Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7, and that can be run under DirectX 9, 10, and 11? I'm curious how this fits together because I've heard such like if you program something in like DirectX11, it cannot be used by Windows XP users, but if you're on Windows 7 you have to use 11, etc. and im just not sure what is true and what is not, so let me put it this way. I wanna learn the API that could be used whether you are on XP, Vista, or 7, and no matter what DirectX version you are on...if possible? [/quote] I choosed DX11. In the future (1, 2 ... years later since now) many people will use Directx 11. If you like it or not you will have to change your version of DX. DX9 is going to be older and older. You should go with the technological progress. If Directx 12, 13 will came out, a big studios will bring to 11, 12 version etc. [quote]My point is learn 3dmaths and things using fixed function in dx9, then when you're good at that step up to writing shaders in dx9. [b]Then when you are master of that you can step up to dx10 [/b]but you will have to do more of the work using that api, a lot of studios don't think its worth it either.[/quote] Get to a master level, will take him a few years, then DX11 will be more popular than DX9. Learn a DX11 will take him a next month (or years). So, his skill with DX9 won't be useful anymore.
  3. Install builders are very fast and easy. By the way, are you polish? (I noticed your surname).
  4. Try to find out (or write your own) toString() & toNumber() in Python - implementation in C++ [url="http://cottonvibes.blogspot.com/2010/10/easy-generic-tostring-function-in-c.html"]http://cottonvibes.b...ction-in-c.html[/url]
  5. ~50 ms should be really nice.
  6. [size=4]What else tutorials Do you prefer guys?[/size]
  7. I am wondering about a book about DX11. I noticed [b]Introduction to 3D Game Programming with Direct3D 11.0[/b] but I would like to download PDF of this book. I have founded out nothing. I don't live in English or USA so I can't just go to a shop books and check this book out. I don't want to spend my money to deliver It to my country when this book is not enough good. Of course I will buy it if i liked. I also saw[b] Beginning DirectX 11 Game-Programming [/b]and i did not like it. [quote name='Black-Rook' timestamp='1349270647' post='4986369'] When you were using OpenGL, what turned you away from using it? [/quote] OGL is good but many game producers use DirectX - it is much popular. Also on GameDev.net: DirectX forums: 7,315,993 posts OpenGL forums: 1,461,866 posts At the moment I will start with http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html tutorials. This is not the best choice but this only what can i do.
  8. [quote name='Black-Rook' timestamp='1349266334' post='4986354'] [quote name='JustABegineer' timestamp='1349222050' post='4986237'] I have been learning OpenGL from NeHe tutorials for half a week. I have stoped because changed my opinion. Of course, OGL is cross-platform and very useful but to be honest - Who use OpenGL as main render device? Nobody... AAA games as well as professional game engines (Source Engine, Unreal Engine, Cry Engine, Quake?, Doom? and many others...) use DirectX.DX also allows you to write games for Xbox, Play Station etc. I would like to learn [b]DirectX 11[/b]. 11 is new and fresh. Say nothing of new features like tessellation and multi-thread rendering, microsoft developers did a big step - everything has been changed since DX9. I think learning will take me a long time. It is not unprofitable(?) to learn DX9, DX9 will be old soon. We will see a new technologies - next Xbox, Play Staton etc... On the other hand DX9 has a lot of tutorials and useful samples from Directx SDK. I also tested WinApi, Allegro and Irrlicht (but i didnt like it). I have spended last 2 days on looking tutorials and some interesting things for DX11. What have i found? [b][url="http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html"]http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html[/url][/b] - This site has a lot of tutorials. I didnt like, a author writes code making a pseudo game engine. To draw a triangle, author wrote many code (like in small pseudo game engine). [b]DirectX 11 samples from SDK[/b] - there are many tutorials for beginners with DX9, intermediate with DX10 and advanced with DX11 (as i said - tessellation, multi-thread rendering etc. and a few tutorials about drawing a triangle) [size=5]So, to sum up, my question is: [b]how should I learn DirectX 11? and how have you learned Directx? (9,10,11 - it dosent matter). [/b][/size] [size=2]That would be very useful instead of broking my head on question - what to do. Sorry for a language mistakes in my text - i am just learning. [/size] [/quote] A lot of games use OpenGL: [url="http://en.wikipedia....OpenGL_programs"]http://en.wikipedia....OpenGL_programs[/url] including Starcraft 2 (OSX version), also the Source Engine and Unreal Engine use OpenGL as well as D3D. You should have a lot of examples provided with the SDK for D3D 11. This site: [url="http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html"]http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html[/url] has plenty of examples and I still recommend it. Your goal shouldn't be to copy how someone structures there code, but what they have done in order to get that given result. You can also go to: [url="http://www.directxtu.../tutorials.aspx"]http://www.directxtu.../tutorials.aspx[/url] You could just as well buy a book: (Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11) [url="http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-3D-Game-Programming-DirectX/dp/1936420228/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1349265694&sr=8-2&keywords=direct+3d+11"]http://www.amazon.co...ds=direct 3d 11[/url] I wouldn't worry about what "people" use for AAA games unless you're making AAA games. To say nobody uses OpenGL for AAA title's is false statement. You can get a group of programmers and artists together that lack skill and ability with the best tools out there, and they still would not be able to make any AAA titles. There is no magic button to producing high quality games. To answer your question on how you should learn DirectX, is to simply just use it! Make a ton of example programs using samples and other tutorials you read up on. I learn API's by understanding the basic structure, and just exploring by spending hours coding with that API. This may not work for everyone because we all learn differently, but much like programming itself, the hours spent coding and exploring is one way to become more familiar with the language. How much programming experience do you have? [/quote] I think, I know C++ enough to learn DX. I had been learning C++ for 3-4 weeks a one year ago. I had a one year break so have been recalling C++ for a 2 weeks. I made some small things like: 2 console games, WinApi game launcher, very small 2D game in Allegro, loader/parser cfg files from Quake etc.
  9. I have been learning OpenGL from NeHe tutorials for half a week. I have stoped because changed my opinion. Of course, OGL is cross-platform and very useful but to be honest - Who use OpenGL as main render device? Nobody... AAA games as well as professional game engines (Source Engine, Unreal Engine, Cry Engine, Quake?, Doom? and many others...) use DirectX.DX also allows you to write games for Xbox, Play Station etc. I would like to learn [b]DirectX 11[/b]. 11 is new and fresh. Say nothing of new features like tessellation and multi-thread rendering, microsoft developers did a big step - everything has been changed since DX9. I think learning will take me a long time. It is not unprofitable(?) to learn DX9, DX9 will be old soon. We will see a new technologies - next Xbox, Play Staton etc... On the other hand DX9 has a lot of tutorials and useful samples from Directx SDK. I also tested WinApi, Allegro and Irrlicht (but i didnt like it). I have spended last 2 days on looking tutorials and some interesting things for DX11. What have i found? [b][url="http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html"]http://www.rastertek.com/tutdx11.html[/url][/b] - This site has a lot of tutorials. I didnt like, a author writes code making a pseudo game engine. To draw a triangle, author wrote many code (like in small pseudo game engine). [b]DirectX 11 samples from SDK[/b] - there are many tutorials for beginners with DX9, intermediate with DX10 and advanced with DX11 (as i said - tessellation, multi-thread rendering etc. and a few tutorials about drawing a triangle) [size=5]So, to sum up, my question is: [b]how should I learn DirectX 11? and how have you learned Directx? (9,10,11 - it dosent matter). [/b][/size] [size=2]That would be very useful instead of broking my head on question - what to do. Sorry for a language mistakes in my text - i am just learning. [/size]