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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

greenthingsjump

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  1. @ jbadams. Thanks! You have been very helpful!
  2. [quote name='NightCreature83' timestamp='1349868167' post='4988672'] Is there any editor or editor plugin somewhere that makes the syntax highlighting in python behave as Visual Assist X(VAX) in VS with C# and C++? I mean I would like to see function calls being highlight in the function color as well as the definition, this will make my life far easier as I find it hard to code fast without VAX in C++ as well. [/quote] I believe pycharm does it, however it is a thirty day trial with an upgrade fee. Twenty-nine for students, ninety-nine for individuals.
  3. After downloading five editor’s and being a bit confused on what I was looking at I started creating the only program I have learned to create. “Hello World” notepad++, komodo edit, IDLE (the free one with python), and pycharm. Being that I can navigate Google fairly well I figured it out on all three. I did not realize that I had criteria. 1. Simple to use, 2. Relatively cheap, 3. Make it user friendly, (easy to learn the program). As sad as this sounds with notepad++ I had a difficult time getting the program to run. (Which I later found out that meant debug mode is what I was looking for) I eventually did through YouTube and learning even more command prompt commands. I started komodo edit and this daunting $300 upgrade ad was staring at me. As silly as this sounds, as a college student there is no way I’m spending $300 anytime soon. It annoyed me. I finally started pycharm and it was amazing! It was easy to use, modest upgrade price and user friendly! Before you start picking me apart on the “user friendly” For me it’s the difference between Google and yahoo. I don’t like yahoo because it so busy. To the average idiot they wouldn’t know what to click first on yahoo and it would take them three times as long to do anything because they don’t know shit. Even if your experienced programmer and you have to switch editors for some reason, it would be nice to have an easy time learning the new program/editor.
  4. Wow! I did not realize I had started such a large topic... lmao.
  5. So to everyone that helped me decided on python to learn programing thanks. Now I need a bit more help. I went to [url="http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonEditors"]http://wiki.python.o...n/PythonEditors[/url], to find an editor and the list was enormous.......... 1. How do you chose? 2. Reccomendations? PS- Im using windows 7.
  6. Thanks! Im new and know I want to get into game programming. I have no Idea where to start. Everyone says C++ Is the way to go... for games. I would was thinking of doing 2d games for now just to get a good understanding of how to develop them. Then later move on to something more advanced. I will be reading in depth on python and lua now. Thanks!
  7. Snow and the huntsman, best movie ever. NOT a childs movie.
  8. (Removed) New to site, didnt realize my orginal post was moved.
  9. Hello! First let me say I have ZERO programming experience. However, I love playing video games. I am not good at math but enjoy the challenge. I like the order and definitve set of rules that programing seems to have. I will learn C++ but that is not what I want to start with. I was looking for a language that would go well with C++, but is easy to learn and works well with it. After I pick the langugae and learn then I will worry about 2D vs 3D games and the engines for it... But most of all I am doing this for fun.... ! TO THE QUESTIONS! 1. What would be a good language that fits the above critirea? 2. Which would be easier for beginners 2d or 3d games? 3. Is it wise to go the "easy route" first? 4. Im attracted to python because I like snakes, weird I know... Would this be a good choice, why (or) why not? PS- (off topic) I do not hear as much as I used about C++, Is it becoming obsolete?
  10. Hello! First let me say I have ZERO programming experience. However, I love playing video games. I am not good at math but enjoy the challenge. I like the order and definitve set of rules that programing seems to have. I will learn C++ but that is not what I want to start with. I was looking for a language that would go well with C++, but is easy to learn and works well with it. After I pick the langugae and learn then I will worry about 2D vs 3D games and the engines for it... On to the questions..! 1. What would be a good language that fits the above critirea? 2. Which would be easier for beginners 2d or 3d games? 3. Is it wise to go the "easy route" first? 4. Im attracted to python because I like snakes, weird I know... Would this be a good choice, why (or) why not?