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Sleicreider

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  1.     Have you tried to get information about cache misses, with the XCode profiler?
  2. Hey,   Recently I've tried to use the Valgrind profiling tool (Linux,OS-X) to detect cache misses, but this tool is far to slow for games.. I've tried to get the XCode Profiler working on OS-X but somehow it doesn't display anything.   Haven't found a Windows Profiler yet.   Do you guys know any better free profiling tools for Windows(VS2015) ,OS-X(XCode) to detect cache misses? Or do you know any thechniques to profile them?  
  3. OpenGL

    haha ok i gotit working.   i had to set the depth buffer size,   but how big should it be?
  4. OpenGL

    I'm using the QT QOpenGLWindow  for Context/window       QSurfaceFormat format;     format.setRenderableType(QSurfaceFormat::OpenGL);     format.setProfile(QSurfaceFormat::CoreProfile);     format.setVersion(3,3);          setFormat(format);
  5. OpenGL

    ok    int depth = 0; glGetIntegerv(GL_DEPTH_BITS, &depth);   here depth is 0     int depth = 0;     glGetIntegerv(GL_DEPTH_WRITEMASK, &depth);   here it is 1
  6. OpenGL

    i only call once        glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);     glClearDepth(1.0);   on init()   and        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);   per frame
  7. Hey,   I have following problem:   Somehow my textures aren't displaying correctly. This should be a simple Box, but somehow some faces are missing..         Is this a depth problem?   Can anyone help?  
  8.   Well, I actually don't care about the degree, I just want to get better and learn new things. The closest university only provides "game related stuff"(computer graphics) in the Master semester, so I would also try to get Master degree.     Yeah thats true, if I study beside work it's even cheaper(maybe no fee at all for working people).     yeah this might be a problem for international jobs :/ Here in austria, my school + 2 year work experience is equal to university degree.
  9. So, you think it would be better to go to a university, than keep learning things on my own (ofc using books etc.) + work?   University (lets say full time) would take 5 years ~ + nearly no time at home because I have to study for the university. In this time I would have 6-7 years of work experience(since i already got 2years) + more time to work on my own projects at home +study game related stuff on my own.
  10. Hey,   I'm currently not sure if I should go to a university or not.   My Story:   I'm 21 years old and from austria. I went to a higher technical institute when I were 14-19 years old, there I started to gain my programming knowledge. At the age of 17~ I started with game development using Java + OpenGL(basics only) for android .  We've learned a little C++ (with QT) in school, but since it wasn't a lot, I started to gain more knowledge about C++ on my own and now C++ is actually no problem for me anymore.   I've worked as C Software Developer last year, but quit the job since it was too boring, and now i'm working as C++ Mobile Games Developer (since september 2014)    where I work on a 2D casino game(which is quite popuplar since we are on top 60), but I actually only create some mini games (gameplay) with a cross-platform engine and a existing framework.    Last year I also started with Unreal Engine 4 where I only use C++ and rarley their BP visual script(because i love c++), but I'm not always motivated, therefore I had a lot of breaks(months),    Thats why I'm not as good as I should be after 1 year. I also started to work with the cocos2d-x engine to develop Android and iOS games and also released a simple mini game (with my brother)    which I remember from my childhood: (our playstore link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Slei.Hazelnut (yup, the game is very simple, with programmer art ;) ) Recently, I also started with GLSL but things go slowly, because I'm also working on my own unreal engine 4 project.   Why I think I should maybe go to University:   Currently my job got kinda boring, since it's always the same and I don't learn new things anymore. At home i'm not always motivated, therefore the learning progress at the moment is really slow. Currently I have no knowledge about game engine architecture(just a little bit by using other engines), Advanced Graphics Programming  and other gameplay stuff (because most of these things are already handled by Engines). I know , I actually should focus on making games and not a engine, but maybe I might need the knowledge in the future. It's also not too bad the have the knowledge since a lot of Game related jobs often require the knowledge, which I'm currently missing.   Why I don't want to go to university:   A lot of programming will be a repeat for me, and I'm also not really interessted in non- game related stuff. There are some universities where you already start with game programming in the first semester, but they are far away from home. universites near me, only provide game related stuff in the master semster, so the Bachelor title will be really boring.     Can anyone give me a advice, if i should consider to go to university or somewhere else? Maybe other options?   Or should I keep learning things by my self? (maybe some advice, how I could improve my learning curve)
  11.         so you take the x,z position you'd place the object at, integer divide x and z by 10, then multiply x and z by 10, and just like that you're snapping to 10x10 grids.   IE: raypick returns coordinates 127,38.  integer divide by 10 yields 12,3. multiply by 10 yields 120,30. so you picked 127,38, but snap to 120,30.     then its just setting the orientation (y rotation). axis aligning everything is one easy way to handle this.   IE y rotation = 0, and make sure your models face the correct direction in your modeling software before export.   that's the general approach that first comes to mind.     this seems to be a good solution :)  i'll try it as fast as possible 
  12. yup i know how to do that :P
  13. well i'm working with ue4, but don't really know where to start. also searched about alignment and snapping, but haven't found much 
  14. I would like to know if this techique has a name and how it works:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epwcLfqHnS0   I saw it in several games, where object are automatically aligned near other objects to build a house or whatever.       can anynone help me?
  15. Unity

    I Really don't know why, really need help with etc1 guys! ETC1 makes me mad