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IanW

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  1. [quote name='TomVD' timestamp='1350658405' post='4991790'] It's rather abstract... so if I understand right, you let the world evolve while the player is playing it? Not like the usual world generator where the world is generated once at the start, but after that it's only the player changing the world. It might be interesting to see the ecosystem behave in a reaction to what the player does. Perhaps the player is not seeing the tier 1 resource you call "energy", but his actions could alter it? Also, do you have a goal or story in mind? There is an ecosystem, but that alone doesn't sound like a "game". [/quote] The world rolls on and does what it does - yes, this isnt a game, this is the infrastructure for a game, that does what it does as the player, or players, does whateve (including possibly spawning fancy graphics, or maybe tier 4 is mobs, or whatever). Note that as a player grabs craftables etc, then they arent there for transformers to transform into other things - so while Our Heroes cant alter tier 1 energy, under this design they can alter tier 2 and so on.
  2. Steal from the master, and have a function key you can press for a Survey, which shows you the Z-dimension. Sid Meier used in Railroad Tycoon, so its alright to do that
  3. Ive been thinking about a procedurally designed ecosystem, and going back to the old Game of Life (which isnt a game - its a set of defined decision-free rules that allow a system to develop from an initial state), Briefly, imagine a series of connected tiles - 2D or 3D, doesnt matter. Tiles can randomly spawn either energy, or mobile units, or - most of the time - nothing. Mobile units can either be collectors or transformers. All units have limited vision. Collectors wander around randomly until they find a single unit of stuff, They then pick it up, and look for the biggest pile of the same sort of stuff they can see. If they dont see one, they keep wandering. When they do, they drop their unit of stuff on the pile, and then go back to wandering. Transformers wander around, looking for piles of stuff. If the piles are big enough, they turn it into a unit of the next order of stuff. If it isnt, keep wandering. Im thinking the first level of stuff is energy, the second order is craftables, the third order is rare craftables and the fourth order is teleporters to interesting areas. My thinking is that players never see the collectors, the transofrmers or the energy. They *can* see, and collect and use, craftables, rare craftables and teleporters. I'd appreciate thoughts.
  4. How much money is it, and how "white" does the money need to be ? Its not exactly as pure as driven snow, but you might want to look at a prepaid Visa card with the money on it, that you give him the numbers for that he can then spend his money on the internet. The "online fruit baskets" option also isnt a terrible one ... get him to set up an account on some "sell crafts online" website. Buy his appallingly overpriced fruit baskets - $199 for a fruit basket ! I'll take five ! Ker-ching. He gets his money, and theres even a paper trail of sorts for the accounts people.
  5. Have you tried looking here http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/index/places/i/
  6. Just to make it really, really clear, the OP said what he wanted "PKs (wolfs) need sheep (miners, PvMers etc) to kill.. It's what they enjoy." In that case, I'd suggest the best solution is for the PKs to be contributing around, say, $10 an hour to each of the PvMers, so the PvMers can be compensated for not doing what they like, which is PvM, so the PKers can do what they like.
  7. [quote name='aattss' timestamp='1350519875' post='4991291'] Also, we're supposed to be brainstorming ways to make this work, not saying it won't work. At minimum, you should describe why it won't work, and listen to people as they take your advice and see if they can use it to come up with a solution. [/quote] Read the thread. Theres a number of solutions, which can collectively be summed up as 'Make the life of a wolf very, very hard'. However, when you do that wannabe wolves whine that their preferred playstyle of making other paying customers victims isnt being respected. Wannabe wolves want all the reward, and none of the risk. They want all the benefits of being a sheep when they feel like that, and to be able to put on wolves clothing when they feel like that (note the popularity of "PvE alts" to fund PvP). So, you either make everyone a wolf - World of Tanks - or you make being a victim voluntary - PvP flags/zones. Either solution doesnt give wannabe wolves their stream of victims, so they come to threads like this and whine.
  8. [quote name='aattss' timestamp='1345942946' post='4973378'] Ideally, if sheeps aren't careful, then wolves could kill them and the wolves would get more stuff than the sheep. However, if the sheep are careful, then they don't get killed and get all the stuff. [/quote] The problem you have is the best way for the sheep to be careful is to not play this game. The point the original poster misses is that its really, really hard to convince someone else to pay to be your victim.
  9. "as for deflecting enemy's blows, that's what I've been referring to as "parry" all along. unless you're talking about something else entirely." Theres a big practical difference between a static block, and deflecting a sword ... generally blocks are done with the front/true/long edge, and deflections are done with the false/short/back edge. An incoming sword with just be stopped, or maybe bounce a little bit, when reversed by a block. But if you deflect it with the false edge, it goes off and down to the side. Oh. Is that a massive hole I can counter-attack through ? Yes, yes it is. Well, then Id suggest that the toon blocks automatically, but only does a fancy back-edge deflection when told to. "In a regular attack you do the swing with your arm which gets impulsed by the rest of your body's movement, right? well a power attack just involves much more impulse movement from the torso and legs (and therefore a stronger hit). the problem is that after the attack you can't go back to a stance/defensive position nearly as easily because the same extra impulse has already thrown you off your balance (ie. you're probably either near the floor or you did a 180º turn and are now looking the other way)." Yes. Thats exactly how it works. A little back-edge cut aimed at the wrist and powered from the wrist is still a cut, and your feet are still positioned to defend you (usually by GTFO-ing in the appropriate direction). But a cut where the feet are committed to the attack - for example, by powering a cut with a hip flick or a sidestep - is far more powerful. "I plan on improving it though, not by making such actions impossible to do, but by making them much slower and reducing body balance much further if stamina is low/depleted." There are few more frustrating things in a fight than the eye seeing a hole the exhausted arm cant hit through. "counter-counter-attack? uhmm interesting. I think that doesn't sound possible: for a counter-attack you're required to block/parry the attack first, and if you add up the quickness of the first counter-attack to the mini-stun the first block/parry caused, I don't think there will be time at all for him to recover and be able to parry. yes I could code that time, after all it's my own system, but wouldn't that make counter-attacks just plain slow?" Heck yeah thats possible. Feint from just outside distance without committing the feet, draw the stop-thrust and then launch the counter attack down another line, committing the feet with a diagonal step to make it the real attack while simultaneously evading their stop-thrust.
  10. This is also an idea I've kicked around, but in my view it's a much, much, much better idea to have pre-loaded sets of moves, so you get a new attack, which is formally defined by a script, and goes on a button. When you want to use it, press button, and your character moves themselves in a position to do it. This is actually how I fight in real life ... for example, this is my left-handed killshot with a one-handed stabby sword. Start position : Left foot facing enemy, right foot back and pointed at 45 degrees. Hips relaxed, knees slightly bent.Left hand holding sword, knuckles 90 degrees left,wrist cocked up so sword points at their throat, elbow bent and at about my right hip. Right hand, palm open, knuckles right covering my heart (yup. Its Di Grassi). Initial move : Left arm extends in a thrust, probably contacting their sword as they parry (its part of the plan, honest !) Second move : Left wrist rolls so knuckles are pointed down. Left foot advances a short diagonal step forward and right. Because the roll of the wrists has avoided their blade, Sword hopefully goes in enemy as the diagonal step beings me closer. Post move : To get back into Start Position, left elbow bends and comes back to left hip, right foot makes a diagonal forward step In a game, the player would have a button marked 'Base Position', which when they hit it would put them in that guard ... how long this takes depends on just what body position the toon is in. When they are in Base Position, they could hit their Special Attack Key, and it would do this move as described above ... or another special attack they've learned. A "normal" player *should* just be about to buy these pre-scripted attacks from other players/NPC trainers for XP. Its asking too much IMO to ask "normal" players to script martial arts moves ... but special snowflakes *should* have the ability to script their own moves in a Toribashi type system, and if they work, give or sell them to other players.