Aus

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About Aus

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  1. I'm not going to try to find your post in a separate thread. Feel free to explain why here. Money is a great motivator for developing [i]any[/i] skill. I've I'm going to spend thousands of hours of my free time perfecting a skill I certainly hope I can generate a little money from it at some point even if that ends up being years down the road. Some people do not need money to motivate them. But I do if I'm planning on sticking with something for the long-haul.
  2. [quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1352571563' post='4999691'] Despite this thread's title, this is not a business post. It's a "from a mercenary perspective, which language/environment should I learn?" Which-language posts belong in For Beginners, so I'm moving this there. [/quote] I already picked the language. Regardless of the outcome of this topic I'm sticking with what I picked. I'm looking for a financial goal to aim for. Finances = business. But I wont tell you how to do your job. Thanks for the posts everyone. Server of the Lord, thank you for the encouragement. I [i]will[/i] be sticking with Python for the long-term and dabble in html for a website I own. I was just curious what money opportunities this language has overall.
  3. The past few weeks I've been getting into Python and HTML a lot. I like them because they are easier than other languages I've attempted in the past. Problem is, if I sink several thousand hours into perfecting my Python skills...what do I have to gain from it? I don't plan on joining any big game or software companies ever - programming will always be an independent hobby for me. But if I can't even make a little money off of it I may just drop it for a different language altogether. For example: with flash games you can at least submit them to Newgrounds and Kongregate and other gaming sites and make ad revenue. You can do that with java games on some sites as well. C++ you can make phone apps to sell.....Python doesn't seem to have these opportunities that I know of? Are any Python game programmers making money off of the games they've made? Any ideas how I can at least make a little profit off of the work I do in this language? I'm thinking long term here. I don't seriously expect to start cranking out AAA games by next month and selling them.
  4. George Washington 2012
  5. Boxes

    This looks awesome!
  6. [quote name='superman3275' timestamp='1351444014' post='4994763'] For downloading and learning the language: [url="http://www.pyglet.org/"]Python Official Website![/url] [/quote] Their official website is actually [url="http://www.Python.org"]Python.org[/url]. I'm not sure what you linked me there but I don't think that's right for downloading Python.
  7. So begins the second journey of becoming a game developer. Chapter 1: HTML, CSS, and Python
  8. [quote name='Zelda.Alex' timestamp='1351440798' post='4994742'] Python is a good choice. Much easier than C++ to learn and use. [quote name='Aus' timestamp='1351371521' post='4994516'] Recently I've become inspired to start programming something. [b]I know I'm probably years off of making actual games[/b] but I would love to reach that point eventually. I just started learning HTML for website design purposes. I figured if I don't get far with this then at least I will have a basic grasp on how to change up my own personal website (albeit a very basic grasp). A friend recommended I start learning Python before anything hard like C++. I would like to someday be making games...are Python and HTML good choices starting out? [/quote]Who said that it will take time to make games? Big games like World of Warcraft may take time but small games you can make in lesser time. If you are using python to learn programming then I would say that you use the book "invent your own computer games with python". It is good learning material and if you keep at it you will learn both python as well as make some games. Enjoy [/quote] I just assume. Like most developed skills I imagine reaching a decent level in programming takes significant time and patience. As a self taught guitar player, I am fully prepared for this. I didn't start writing instrumentals on guitar when I first started playing. Likewise, I don't expect to be making games right away either. The sooner the better though. Thanks for the advice everyone. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
  9. Recently I've become inspired to start programming [i]something[/i]. I know I'm probably years off of making actual games but I would love to reach that point eventually. I just started learning HTML for website design purposes. I figured if I don't get far with this then at least I will have a basic grasp on how to change up my own personal website (albeit a very basic grasp). A friend recommended I start learning Python before anything hard like C++. I would like to someday be making games...are Python and HTML good choices starting out?