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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Badwolf1

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  1. [quote name='NEXUSKill' timestamp='1352209736' post='4998023'] Right now the consensus seems to be that XNA is finally dying, in its place we are left with Mono, on which Unity is built, and which is built upon SharpDX if I'm not mistaken, that would be the chain to follow depending on the level of abstraction you want to work with. If you like low level take SharpDX, if you want some wrapping and multi platform support but don't want a high level abstraction use mono, and if you are fine with taking only gameplay logic within a highly abstracted framework, Unity is a very comfortable engine to use. [/quote] I think your referring to [url="http://monogame.codeplex.com/"]MonoGame[/url] (Open Source implementation of the Microsoft XNA 4 Framework). The [url="http://www.mono-project.com/Main_Page"]Mono Project[/url] itself is basically a cross platform implementation of .Net which makes it possible to create cross plateform applications in C#/ASP.Net and many others and which Unity does use. MonoGame according to the site uses [url="http://www.opentk.com/"]OpenTK[/url] for OpenGL rendering or [url="http://sharpdx.org"]SharpDX[/url] for DirectX rendering depending on which platform its running on. I've been considering using these projects myself but haven't done so yet. Anyways hope this informations helpful in clearing up any problems if nothing else OpenTK could be useful to you in the future if you decide to go with SharpDX and later want to mess with OpenGL and possible cross platform implementations. PS: Posted mostly to try and clear up any miss misunderstandings.
  2. You actually might be partly right about Windows 8 being the last "Windows" release since they are at least considering changing the name with the project codenamed [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midori_%28operating_system%29"]Midori[/url] (Not the browser). Not sure how accurate this information is since its from wiki however based off similar [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singularity_%28operating_system%29"]projects[/url] we know they are pushing forward more with the idea of a Managed Code OS. Should be interesting at any rate.
  3. [quote name='DavidGArce1337' timestamp='1352070967' post='4997332'] [quote name='Badwolf1' timestamp='1352067107' post='4997314'] Question 1 (Well the second part of it): Because of the open source nature of GNU/Linux all of the good killer apps are ported to other platforms and so you really wont have a big reason in that reguard to switch to linux. Would like to know exactly what nonsense you feel like the Linux community is spreading but in the hope of preventing a war I'll leave it at that. [/quote] By the nonsense, I ment to the ones that say that it is better and hate on Windows. Maybe it runs "faster" or hogs less memory. But I already have a 5 year old lappy with 3GBs of RAM running Win7 and tested Win8 on and it runs just fine. But, yes. We should leave it at that. [quote name='Badwolf1' timestamp='1352067107' post='4997314'] Question 3: Windows 8's rules on the new Windows Store is where Game Development gets impacted most they have it pretty restrictive on what they allow into their store and thats were a lot of the concern for it is. Windows is also the OS of choice for low end computer manufactors so yes its going to get a lot of numbers based on that alone. [/quote] What don't they allow on the store that makes it pretty restrictive? [quote name='Badwolf1' timestamp='1352067107' post='4997314'] If you have no reason to switch and enjoy Microsoft congrats. I sincerely wish you the best of look in the future, but please don't think down on those that use GNU/Linux. I don't down on those that use Windows and Mac. [/quote] I don't think down on them. Just the fanatics. I like logic. And I don't see Linux as a viable platform to target for games. And that's the reason I run Windows, first. I do see an Android type of PC in my future tho, and yes, I know, don't say it. But, it is different and more mainstream! jaja [/quote] The fanatics go with everything and I would agree that I'm just as tired of the whole "Mines better and greater then your's" responses as you I am sure are as well. They are unconstructive and just plain wrong in many cases. Yes you can tweak to make it boot faster and run a little faster but you usually can with any operating system if you know what your doing and in general it comes down more to the hardware then it does the operating system itself. As for the store I'm not aware of the specifics so if someone more well informed then me would please answer this question I was just making a general statement from what I've read from others and the stores policys appear to be a hot topic. I dont for see Linux itself become a main player without a big corporate backing however I do think operating systems based off Linux/Unix/FreeBSD will become more popular and its not that the OS itself can't be stable enough to be I just think that its more likely to be forked/split into a different project as Google did with Linux or Mac OS X did with FreeBSD.
  4. [quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1352071106' post='4997334'] Interesting ... Linux is also incompatible with 99% of the software out there, with no good alternative of it's own. Also I swear to the gods ... Linux programmers have no clue what a wizard is for, or how to implement them! [/quote] If its Windows/Mac only software then yes your going to run into a lot of incompatibility, however I do find that the community does try and do a good job of making either native solutions available (Libreoffice can open and save to just about any Windows word format I've needed) or create work arounds using CrossOver/Wine. However keep in mind looking at it from the other side you will rarely find an application in the Linux community that will not also run on Windows and in many cases Mac, just something to think about. As for install wizards most distributions have package management systems which do a far better job of taking care of installs in my opinion however compiling from source when such a solution isn't available in the repository's does become a pain sometimes I'll admit.
  5. [quote name='DavidGArce1337' timestamp='1352060798' post='4997282'] One question, what are the totals? The percentage is lowering but are the numbers declining? One thing I dislike about this is, Linux crowd, where are your "killer aps"? Where are your "killer games"? All these years complaining and talking nonsense and yet, absolutely nothing to make me even think about trying the OS. Windows 8? I tried it as soon as I could. Linux(anything)...why bother? Question two, Why even bother with something like Linux? Question three, Why does it matter to game developers? I mean, Windows 8 is already a viable platform isn't it? Its almost as high as a 3DS, it just came out(!) and obviously higher than a PS Vita. Much higher than an Ouya will ever be. And in a year or two, much higher than this current gen of consoles put together. And that's just Windows 8(and its own Store). My view is, MS is king on the PC. I have no reason to switch. I would like an ARM based fully functional Laptop tho. Not here yet. x86 Windows 8 Pro it is! =P [/quote] Question 1 (Well the second part of it): Because of the open source nature of GNU/Linux all of the good killer apps are ported to other platforms and so you really wont have a big reason in that reguard to switch to linux. Would like to know exactly what nonsense you feel like the Linux community is spreading but in the hope of preventing a war I'll leave it at that. Question 2: For those looking for something different usually, I personally just got tired of jumping through hopes with Windows and didn't feel it worth my money to buy a new Windows licenes when I personally could accomplish anything I would want to do on Windows on GNU/Linux (and the hit in performance for running Windows games through wine was an acceptable loss for me). Also most people that actually make the switch don't do it if they are looking for it to be Windows if you love windows and it works for you then your most likely looking for a "Free" Windows which GNU/Linux is not it is its own OS and if your trying it with the attempt of it being a "Free" Windows your going to have a very hard time enjoying it. Question 3: Windows 8's rules on the new Windows Store is where Game Development gets impacted most they have it pretty restrictive on what they allow into their store and thats were a lot of the concern for it is. Windows is also the OS of choice for low end computer manufactors so yes its going to get a lot of numbers based on that alone. If you have no reason to switch and enjoy Microsoft congrats. I sincerely wish you the best of look in the future, but please don't think down on those that use GNU/Linux. I don't down on those that use Windows and Mac.