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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

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  1. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352684054' post='5000081'] Man, this thread has become a history lesson. [/quote] I came to have a work in progress reviewed, I left with greater understanding of the German boogeyman. hah....behold, the power of the internet.
  2. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352682914' post='5000075'] The culture was actually Germany. [/quote] figures Egyptian, Greek, Native American, and Norse mythology you hear about, Chinese less so. German mythology seems non existent by comparison. I only know of a few myths that are originally German.
  3. I mean, 1300 a.d. that's gotta be at least during the crusades, definantly before the Chinese discovered how to weaponize black powder....Rome had fallen by then....interesting.
  4. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352681947' post='5000064'] They dated all the way back to the late 1300s, early 1400s. I would love to see a slender game with a story. [/quote] 1300s? wow, not sure I know where exactly that is at in regards to advances in society and cultures chronologically, what cultures where telling these stories?
  5. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352681011' post='5000059'] They saw stories from those days of a man called "the tall man" who was tall, had several arms, had a white face, and several tentacles. Just like today's story. [/quote] except for the multiple arms and white face, he almost sounds like a Cthulhu prototype. How far back are you talking about, I mean we talking before or after the discovery of america?
  6. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352680499' post='5000055'] Believe it or not, there have been stories of the Slender back in those times, tales of a tall man with long arms that stalked people. [/quote] really? did it go by another name, or that the time the story was written wasn't older just the setting of it?
  7. My idea on the end game events was that the player finds themselves in a situation where running or failing to kill the creature before it can escape is no longer an option, either they are trapped somewhere and the creature comes for them, or guards or bounty hunter of some kind have captured them, and their last chance to prove their innocence is to provide the world with a body, be it the creatures, or someone else that looks enough like you to shift the blame to. As for the ending, it would change based on just how much damage the creature did, if you chose to struggle in the wild, the creature never got a chance to enter a village, and your bounty may be limited to disturbing the peace or questioning in the deaths of numerous thieves and bandits. On the other hand, if you never stopped using the easier less dangerous villages as a haven, you could be accused of mass murder, possibly cannibalism. Such crimes would be much harder to escape with your life.
  8. [quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1352679871' post='5000047'] [quote name='ThisIsAUsername' timestamp='1352679443' post='5000044'] [quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1352679015' post='5000041'] [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352678637' post='5000039'] Don't worry, I noticed. Anyway, slenderman is a man with no face, and he wears a business suit. He stalks and kills people. Before they die, they see him everywhere they go. Kind of sounds like your story. [/quote] meh, its not working. I'll deal with it later. Anyways, your right. His theorisation is similar, a bit like my game and bastion. Which is why you'll have to look at slendermen, to see what you can do differently in yours so as to make yours "unique". [quote name='ThisIsAUsername' timestamp='1352678154' post='5000032'] My idea for the beast was, its real for you and you alone. It might exist but its just as likely that your character is insane, and very dangerous because of there hallucinations. From your perspective, there is this destructive impossible thing hunting you down and killing people whenever it shows up. No one else sees it because from their perspective, they literally see you doing these things to them. No one believes in monsters like the creature, so no one seriously believes that your being hunted by it. I didn't wan to explain how it finds you or give proof that its there, [/quote] I was saying everything in theory, in actual reality the player will have no idea about any of this. It will just happen and he'll have to figure it out as he goes. The problem with never giving proof it is there, is that their is no solution to your problem of endings. You'll have three choices, stay in solitude forever, go to jail or get executed. None of these are good endings, which creates the problem of an "all negative game". Even slendermen has a good ending, where you collect all the papers. It's a necessity within games, for without it the player is never satisified since it doesn't really feel like a "victory" as such. If you don't wish the beast to become known, you'll have to find a solution for that. [/quote] I see what you mean, I'll admit I haven't had much time to fully flesh the details of the story line out, more focus has been placed on game controls and visual style. One of the possible endings could be that this thing does turn out to be real, or at the least, evidence of your innocence could be found, though the character themselves may always wonder about what really happened. [/quote] possible, in his last battle, they find evidence of the beast having been there through a paw mark or something of the sort. Yet later on, he starts having flashbacks of himself making that exact paw. It can be him knowing accurately he made it, or him suspecting it through finding a tool on the ground or something. You can even let the player choose to reveal such, or pretend nothing happened.The visual style should have a calm, serene effect when the beast or villagers are not near and either go into intense, ominous style for the beast or scary, quickened style for the villagers. With games like these, it's all about smoothly shifting between the different instances. [/quote] True, ominous music and lighting changes would definantly clue players in to whats happening,
  9. My idea was that the player to some manner becomes aware that staying in a populated are grants longer safety from the creature then hiding out in the wilds in an abandoned house or cave area, the downside is, that when you do choose to put people in danger by living among them with this thing after you, you are blamed for its actions, because you are what people see doing everything you see the creature doing. Does someone being hunted by a monster DESERVE a happy ending when they choose to blatantly risk and constantly get other people killed for the sake of a warm bed and easier to acquire meals?
  10. [quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1352679015' post='5000041'] [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352678637' post='5000039'] Don't worry, I noticed. Anyway, slenderman is a man with no face, and he wears a business suit. He stalks and kills people. Before they die, they see him everywhere they go. Kind of sounds like your story. [/quote] meh, its not working. I'll deal with it later. Anyways, your right. His theorisation is similar, a bit like my game and bastion. Which is why you'll have to look at slendermen, to see what you can do differently in yours so as to make yours "unique". [quote name='ThisIsAUsername' timestamp='1352678154' post='5000032'] My idea for the beast was, its real for you and you alone. It might exist but its just as likely that your character is insane, and very dangerous because of there hallucinations. From your perspective, there is this destructive impossible thing hunting you down and killing people whenever it shows up. No one else sees it because from their perspective, they literally see you doing these things to them. No one believes in monsters like the creature, so no one seriously believes that your being hunted by it. I didn't wan to explain how it finds you or give proof that its there, [/quote] I was saying everything in theory, in actual reality the player will have no idea about any of this. It will just happen and he'll have to figure it out as he goes. The problem with never giving proof it is there, is that their is no solution to your problem of endings. You'll have three choices, stay in solitude forever, go to jail or get executed. None of these are good endings, which creates the problem of an "all negative game". Even slendermen has a good ending, where you collect all the papers. It's a necessity within games, for without it the player is never satisified since it doesn't really feel like a "victory" as such. If you don't wish the beast to become known, you'll have to find a solution for that. [/quote] I see what you mean, I'll admit I haven't had much time to fully flesh the details of the story line out, more focus has been placed on game controls and visual style. One of the possible endings could be that this thing does turn out to be real, or at the least, evidence of your innocence could be found, though the character themselves may always wonder about what really happened.
  11. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352678637' post='5000039'] Before they die, they see him everywhere they go [/quote] everywhere they go......interesting....would certainly make you paranoid if you saw and or heard the thing all the time, but it only actually did anything occasionally.
  12. [quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352678637' post='5000039'] Don't worry, I noticed. Anyway, slenderman is a man with no face, and he wears a business suit. He stalks and kills people. Before they die, they see him everywhere they go. Kind of sounds like your story. [/quote] I see what you mean, though it sounds more modern or at least post-medieval era, a business suit isn't something one would expect to see in a medieval setting.
  13. np[quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1352678410' post='5000036'] WOH. hold on. I'm signed in as ShiftyCake, not ShiftyKake.......... what. :/ so this means I made an account for ShiftyCake without realising, and is why I had to make Shiftykake. This sucks. Signing into my real account now, sorry. [/quote] np
  14. I like the idea of there being rumors spreading about the events though, would definatly be a realistic explanation for why people would begin to recognize you later on in the game, wanted posters where one idea I had but rumors spreading makes sense.
  15. [quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1352677952' post='5000030'] [quote name='ThisIsAUsername' timestamp='1352677709' post='5000029'] not sure how the posting methodds work on this site yet, is there a "reply" option for posts by other people? or do you just reply to the original topic and hope the person you are talkign to notices it? [/quote] quote. Instantly quotes the other person's post, so they know your replying to them. [/quote] ah, thanks