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BRRGames

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  1. Ah gotcha! Totally understand where you're coming from now. All I can say is that, the best designers have bombs too. So do not fear failure. If anything, you can't really learn to improve, till you bomb out. ;) Personally, I design games I want to play. If others want to play it too, then yeehaw!
  2. Completely agree with all of the above. You couldn't spend the first twelve months of your career better than creating 3-4 small games. Being able to prove you can move through a project from start to finish is MUCH more important to employers, than having fantastic ideas and starting things that go nowhere. Plenty of time to make your MMO after the first twelve months.
  3. Personally I think it's easier to determine figure out how to represent karma AFTER the type of game is worked out. For instance: Strategy - good could result in small boosts to various things such as higher crop yield, scientific breakthrough, better battle odds and bad could result in small penalties such as higher disaster chance, worse combat odds, etc. RPG - karma here could affect the type of treasures found, chance of finding secrets, maybe even a special quest (either a good aligned quest or a bad aligned quest). The most obvious for RPG's is that karma determines the skills and class abilities, even spell lists of the player. I could go on, but there's a lot of genres and my lunch break has run out.
  4. I like the suggestions above, just giving you another option: Whilst questing, rumors of new quests come with the navigation coords of that planet. Those coords are entered into the ship's navigation system, which then allows you to hyperspace to it. BTW, if you only allow hyperspace jumps between planets, there is no need to have the entirety of space in game (ie: Infinity style). You'd be able to get away with each planetary system (ie: star plus any planets, satellite objects, etc) being an isolated scene, thus making it easier to manage.
  5. eugene2k thanks for the feedback. My intention is to focus on the cardinal sins. Whilst tradition says there are seven cardinal sins, Galatians 5 in the Bible notes the following mortal sins (what we call the seven deadly sins in modern times) as such: - adultery - fornication - uncleanness - lasciviousness - idolatry - sorcery - hatred - variance - emulations - wrath - strife - sedition - heresies - envy - murder - drunkenness - revelings This is a more complete list and as I see it, by increasing the number of these sins which you have to process provide a higher difficulty as time goes by. The increasing population of Earth over time is also another way to increase difficulty. So not only do you need to adjust to more sins to administer, but there are more souls arriving to be processed. A similar mechanic to Theme Hospital's disaster can be done through "a war on Earth" where a batch of souls arrive to be processed at the same time. Satan's Generals can also make increasing demands for payments of soul power during the level to ensure an increasing difficulty level. Ultimately, it will be this multi-pronged approach which will provide the player a harder and harder game as they go through the levels. PS: I used to play Afterlife too. Not a bad game at all! Of course, that leads to a sequel doesn't it, Heavenish Administrator. ;)
  6. [quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354102423' post='5004935'] When I said WoW is the longest running MMO, I was saying that it is the longest running while maintaining a solid playerbase and being somewhat mainstream. [/quote] Sorry again. NationStates opened 2 years earlier and has a solid playerbase and been mainstream since it opened. ;) WoW is the most popular MMO, but certainly not the longest running mainstream one. BTW, I was mistaken before. It's not The Realm Online, but Furcadia which claims to be the longest continuous MMO. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furcadia
  7. [quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354061897' post='5004754']as WoW is the longest running MMO to date[/quote] The Realm Online is the longest running.
  8. Not all MMO's are like this. For instance CitiesXL and SimCity 2013 have/will have an MMO planet where each player gets their own city site to construct on. Each city is able to interact with the world, and decisions in one city can have an impact (albeit tiny impact) on other cities.
  9. Colbya, I wouldn't worry so much about school, and start focusing on your portfolio. My experience with game studios, and the IT industry as a whole (17 years in IT before moving to games) is that a diploma, degree, etc is just seen as a piece of paper. A nice to have, but doesn't prove skill. Your portfolio is where you will show potential employers what you can do.
  10. Good advice WavyVirus, I didn't consider that. Thanks for pointing it out. I'll make notes on that point. I am hoping to have some cartoony way to depict the actual staff as Imps, or even just a selection of lesser creatures of Hell. And of course the person giving you the mission briefing just has to be a lesser demon.
  11. This is good, a good start. I would also look at some way of tieing concepts together to make the game more interactive with other parts of the game. For instance, your workers could supply resources (wood, metal, etc) to factories which supplies goods to shopping complexes which supplies luxuries to workers which raises taxes and happiness which translates into more efficient resource collection. There is the basic foundations of a game economy in one sentence. You may go a different path, but it should help you to work out how each part of the game works with each other part.
  12. I think you need to have a clear and concise idea of what this game is. At the moment it sounds pretty rambling (which you acknowledge). One problem you may have is that whilst thinking of these ideas, you may end up with the complexity you said at the top you want to avoid. For instance, having workers return to an apartment and shopping at malls. Here's what I'd suggest: - Describe what you want this game to be in one simple sentence. eg: [i]This game is a turn based role play game that takes the player through each day of their life.[/i] This allows you to focus and avoid feature creep. - Decide exactly what "a turn" simulates: an hour, a day, a week, a year, etc. - Once you figure out what a turn is, then think of some tasks a player can achieve in that turn which is directly related to your description in the one sentence above, and you want each task to be either finished in that turn, or finished in a couple of turns: chop a tree, go shopping, go to work, build a house. You should be on a roll from this point on. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Let us know how you go.
  13. Have you looked into how other flight sims do this? From memory (I don't really play them) it's something like a circle and a small crosshair and when they crosshair is inside the circle you've got the target locked.
  14. To get around the "ranger can hit me but I can't hit them" issue you could have an item that could be found (or gained through a tough puzzle) that helps deflect ranger shots. A shield is the most obvious answer for an item, but could be a number of things. If you want to make the item more common, then have the shield break after X number of shots so the player has to keep finding one. You could make an interesting player choice out of this too: - Do I go for the tough two-handed sword which has a small chance of insta-kill melee units? - Do I go for the weaker short sword but allows me to carry a shield?
  15. Here's one big secret to design: [i]Inspiration is all around you![/i] [i]You just have to 'see' it.[/i] Basically, yes you can sit there and try to "force" yourself to think of a certain game design, but in my experience this is not the best way to go about game design. I find that my best ideas just come to me whilst simply going through my normal life. What you need to do is recognise when you have one of those ideas and note the idea down in one sentence. Then later when you sit at your desk instead of trying to "force" yourself to think of an idea, you already have your initial idea from inspiration to start from. Note: this is based on the number of ideas from "forced" and "came to me" that I throw out.