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reppinfreedom

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  1. How many fellow social gaming developers are in here? Curious if there are any other people in here who have been high rollers with 300-500k+ DAU games.
  2. Aha... Viola! Now this should be correct in converting xyVel into a velocity and an angle... Now I should be able to solve it. [source lang="java"] public static function xyVelToVelAngle(xyVel:Point):Object { var velAngle:Object = new Object(); var Angle:Number = Math.atan2(xyVel.y,xyVel.x); var Degrees:Number = 360 * (Angle / (2 * Math.PI)); if (Degrees < 0) { Degrees = Degrees + 360; } velAngle.Angle = Degrees-180; velAngle.Vel = Math.sqrt(xyVel.x * xyVel.x + xyVel.y * xyVel.y); return velAngle; }[/source] Edit: Changed "velAngle.Angle = Degrees" to "velAngle.Angle = Degrees-180"... Now correct! Those functions were a little funky... This should be more proper and readable. [source lang="java"] public static function xyVelToVelAngle(xyVel:Point):Object { var velAngle:Object = new Object(); var Angle:Number = Math.atan2(xyVel.y,xyVel.x); var Degrees:Number = radToDeg(Angle); velAngle.Angle = Degrees; velAngle.Vel = Math.sqrt(xyVel.x * xyVel.x + xyVel.y * xyVel.y); return velAngle; } public static function angleBetweenPoints(Location:Point, Target:Point):Number { var dx:Number = Location.x - Target.x; var dy:Number = Location.y - Target.y; var Angle:Number = Math.atan2(dy,dx); var Degrees:Number = radToDeg(Angle); return Degrees; } public static function radToDeg(Radian:Number):Number { return Radian * 180 / Math.PI; } public static function degToRad(Degree:Number):Number { return Degree * Math.PI / 180; } [/source] Ok, this is what I came up with... [source lang="java"] public static function animationAndSpeedToNextRowCol(currentRowCol:Object, nextRowCol:Object, tileSizeX:int, tileSizeY:int):Object { var angleSpeed:Object = new Object(); var Angle:int=Math.floor(gameMath.angleBetweenPoints(rowColToPoint(currentRowCol,tileSizeX,tileSizeY),rowColToPoint(nextRowCol,tileSizeX,tileSizeY))); if (Angle == 0) { angleSpeed.Animation="l"; angleSpeed.Speed=1; } else if (Angle == 26) { angleSpeed.Animation="ul"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.707; } else if (Angle == 90) { angleSpeed.Animation="u"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.5; } else if (Angle == 153) { angleSpeed.Animation="ur"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.707; } else if (Angle == 180) { angleSpeed.Animation="r"; angleSpeed.Speed=1; } else if (Angle == -154) { angleSpeed.Animation="dr"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.707; } else if (Angle == -90) { angleSpeed.Animation="d"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.5; } else if (Angle == -27) { angleSpeed.Animation="dl"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.707; } else { angleSpeed=null; } return angleSpeed; } [/source] Edit: Ok... I finally managed to run a test that generated the numbers for me... These are the final multipliers simplified to four decimals of accuracy. Sideways: 1.4142 Angle: 1.118 Up/Down: 0.7071
  3. Okay... So I created a function to convert a x/y velocity into an angle... Now, I need to solve for the velocity... It something as simple as Math.sqrt(xVel + yVel)?<br /> [source lang=&amp;amp;quot;java&amp;amp;quot;]<br /> public static function xyVelToAngle(xyVel:Point):Number {<br /> var Angle:Number = Math.atan2(xyVel.y,xyVel.x);<br /> var Degrees:Number = 360 * (Angle / (2 * Math.PI));<br /> if (Degrees &amp;amp;lt; 0) {<br /> Degrees = Degrees + 360;<br /> }<br /> return Degrees;<br /> }<br /> [/source]
  4. The problem is I only have one of the cartesian to polar/polar to cartesian functions I need both functions to solve this... I need to convert the x/y velocity from the normal to isometric conversion function into speed and angle... Hmmm... *Searching.*
  5. I have conversion classes for converting between isometric and normal coordinates... I just want to keep the code lighter and faster. If I wanted perfect accuracy I would calculate out everything on a non isometric coordinate grid. I would just set a velocity and angle... But, I want things to run faster and not require many conversions and calculations. [source lang="java"] public static function getXyVelocity(Velocity:Number, Angle:Number):Point { var newPoint = new Point(); newPoint.x = - Velocity * Math.cos(Angle * Math.PI / 180); newPoint.y = - Velocity * Math.sin(Angle * Math.PI / 180); return newPoint; } [/source] Then I would run a conversion to isometric velocity and angle from normal. [source lang="java"] package Michael{ public class iso3dTransformer { static var Ratio:Number=2; public static function convertToIso(screenPoint:Object):Object { var zPos:Number=screenPoint.z; var yPos:Number=screenPoint.y-screenPoint.x/Ratio+screenPoint.z; var xPos:Number=screenPoint.x/Ratio+screenPoint.y+screenPoint.z; return new Object(x:xPos,y:yPos,z:zPos); } public static function transformForDisplay(displayPoint:Object):Object { var zPos:Number=displayPoint.z; var yPos:Number=(displayPoint.x+displayPoint.y)/Ratio-displayPoint.z; var xPos:Number=displayPoint.x-displayPoint.y; return new Object(x:xPos,y:yPos,z:zPos); } } } [/source]
  6. No, that math of mine was definitely not correct... I just checked the math... Here are the tile distances... Horizontal:92 Vertical: 46 Angular: 51.5 Rounded, Actually: (51.42956348249516) According to my calculations angular speed should be... 0.55978260% of Horizontal. So a multiplier of 0.56 would be correct? Hmmm... That doesn't sound right... I think I need to calculate out non isometric tile distances first to solve this easier...
  7. Can someone verify that this math is correct? If your traveling up or down on an isometric map the speed of the character should be half that of traveling horizontal. What I am not sure about is traveling at an angle. The character speed should be the horizontal and vertical speeds divided together correct? So 0.75. This will be multiplied times the actual character speed. Hmmm... Going to go see if I can find some information on eight directional isometric character movement speeds... [source lang="java"] public static function animationAndSpeedToNextRowCol(currentRowCol:Object, nextRowCol:Object, tileSizeX:int, tileSizeY:int):Object { var angleSpeed:Object = new Object(); var Angle:int=Math.floor(gameMath.angleBetweenPoints(rowColToPoint(currentRowCol,tileSizeX,tileSizeY),rowColToPoint(nextRowCol,tileSizeX,tileSizeY))); if (Angle == 0) { angleSpeed.Animation="l"; angleSpeed.Speed=1; } else if (Angle == 26) { angleSpeed.Animation="ul"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.75; } else if (Angle == 90) { angleSpeed.Animation="u"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.5; } else if (Angle == 153) { angleSpeed.Animation="ur"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.75; } else if (Angle == 180) { angleSpeed.Animation="r"; angleSpeed.Speed=1; } else if (Angle == 206) { angleSpeed.Animation="dr"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.75; } else if (Angle == 270) { angleSpeed.Animation="d"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.5; } else if (Angle == 333) { angleSpeed.Animation="dl"; angleSpeed.Speed=0.75; } else { angleSpeed=null; } return angleSpeed; } [/source]
  8. Here is additional proof for any remaining disbelievers. Tax scan from before when I sold the business off to a friend. Hardly could call it a business... I was the only programmer/developer and managing a 14+ server cluster and game development. Got burned out quite fast. I wasn't interested in hiring and expanding into a full company and just hired contractors for art and server structure optimization. I also had a overnight part time user support guy hired through odesk who had a special email address rigged to a blaring alarm on my smartphone for server issues. Getting woken up at 3am for a mysql database corruption is a lot of fun! Anyway... How many game developers in here are interested in getting some free tips on how to break into social gaming? I'm in a good mood today and feel like sharing some tips. If anyone doesn't like social gaming and social games it's probably because you just don't understand the business. I worked on a bunch of apps for friend of mine that grew to over 250k users/day before launching my own game. What gave me an edge is that I was an affiliate marketer as a hobby early in college. Without some kind of marketing background it's very hard to make it in social gaming...
  9. If so... You probably hate me. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] A Japan or China based social gaming company (forget who, sixwaves or someone) researched who was the first person to launch a virtual farming game on any US social network an it was confirmed to be me! I didn't make that much money off it. I was only making around 100k/month at the top before I started selling the app off. Proof? Just google "designermichael llc playsocial vs zynga". Check my username which is same as on FB "http://facebook.com/reppinfreedom". So, how many haters are there in here? [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/happy.png[/img] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/ph34r.png[/img] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.png[/img]
  10. I think it's simplest just to let the artist give you a quote on the job. Btw, very nice looking game Ashaman73! Any artists around here have any comments? Trying to get an estimate on graphics costs for a game I am launching in early 2014. Heres some details on the art. Cartoon style isometric art with gradients and one layer of shading to give depth. (For example, the show family guy generally uses one pass of non gradient shading. See attached!) Shadows will be used below isometric characters to reinforce perspective. Top down lighting. Also attached is one of my rough 2d drawings for the game. I should add in more shading to give the drawing depth. Ugh, drawing is hard! I am not an artist... An artist should be able to easily understand the style I am aiming for though. Here is an example of a small part of the game art... Ten 90x46px character sprite sheet's isometric with eight directions of movement. With top down lighting that is just five different animations. About ten frames per character action... Five unique actions. Walking, idling in place, moving fast, etc... Works out to 250 sprites total, but only about 25 semi unique vector sprites which are manipulated frame by frame for the animation. What would be a fair price for that? I am only looking for art quality around what the top vector facebook social games have. I am a social app developer.
  11. I have not personally contracted out any vector graphics that I can remember... Just logo's and banner's. When I was purchasing isometric pixel art a few years ago I was paying 3.5k per 8 sprite sheets like the attached example. I was sometimes paying certain artists upto $500 per 180x180px for more detailed game elements like buildings, trees, and etc... The quality of art can make or break a game. How much is fair price for high quality isometric Vector graphics? A company of a friend of mine was paying around 15k for the graphics for small arcade games a year ago. Their games used 2d vector/vexel art. I have never paid by the hour. I have always negociated a price for each job based upon the number of pixels and the quality of the work. This below is Copyrighted. Don't take!