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hughdesmond2006

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  1. yeah i did the same thing with my ps3 couple of years ago, ebayed it and sold all my games. but then after a few months i went crazy and bought an xbox haha!!   Then i went through another similar phase but less extreme about 4/5 months ago, didnt sell my Xbox  but just didn't renew my live gold and most of the games i have for it i only play multiplayer so its like the same thing. It went very well up until just before xmas, i started dabbing in free or old PC games which i haven't done in years and gradually got back into gaming with the excitement surrounding all the great new releases around that time, November i think, was a crazy month for great game releases.   Thing is, its still great to have games for downtime, say if i was tired from some exercise, often im not tired enough to go straight to bed, but my brain isn't in the right mode for programming/creativity, then i wouldn't feel guilty relaxing and playing some games, just like anyone else might watch some evening TV or read a book. Sadly the addictive nature of games + an addictive personality leads to game time spilling into other less suitable time periods for example the one we all struggle with - BED TIME!! :D
  2.   Y'know, you're right.  I read back through the OP and at no point was there ever a request for advice.  I just jumped into that mode because I saw the same mindset and roadblocks that I used to struggle with and got all preachy.  Sorry for pushing my assumptions.  Good luck with the project.   Thanks man!
  3.   Because there's nothing to really gain from talking about it.  The point of my "I don't know what you expect to get" starter was that procrastination as a stumbling block is only ever solved by finally getting to work, no matter how much discussing you do about it.  No one has ever stopped procrastinating on a task by talking to other people about how they're putting off getting started.  And it sounds like you have quite the task on your hands and an approaching deadline.       This is why I can't take it seriously as a "lets ponder the origins and solutions to procrastination" discussion.  It's an issue of discipline, and comments like this say "I don't have any".  There's your answer.  It's like eating junk food instead of making yourself a healthy dinner: games are immediate gratification, hard work takes time and isn't fun.  Until it is, which happens pretty much once you start.   Since this is a college assignment, it's not optional (unless you're deciding passing your course is optional, in which case, game away!), otherwise I'd second someone's comment earlier that you should instead pick something you're more interested in working on.  As for your theory, it reads more like denial or an excuse: "obviously it's the games' fault that I'm not motivated!"  Please.  You don't want to work on the project because it's work.  I'm just going to say it's due to burnout from being in school for a while, I too had trouble being as motivated in the last semesters of my undergrad.  But I still worked on some pretty awesome projects that got me fired up once I got started.     OK. so at this point i could easily pick flaws in what you are saying and start a big long internet argument which would drag out for ages and be of no use to anyone but for both of us defending our massive egos. Instead i will just say this, i made the thread to get people to share their experiences on this topic because i thought it would be interesting to read, if that in itself is procrastination then so be it. I am not looking for a solution, i know what i need to do. I'm sorry if i didn't communicate this well.
  4.   Yeah, that is SO me! I always put off starting stuff. Also i try to keep code open to remind me of what i should be doing! sometimes even a little code tweak is enough to get me going and once im off trying to solve a problem, im usually engaged until it is solved or i have to sleep!    @Happycoder thanks for the article. Ive been considering the extreme route, going cold turkey on games, but i just so happened to make the worst decision ever by getting a graphics card for xmas! I gave in, my stupid brain just wants games XD.   @BCullis I think by now you should know exactly what i want to get from this, a good discussion. Its not often talked about.
  5. Anyone else find if they put the same amount of time they spend PLAYING video games into MAKING them, you would be flying it!    I have less then a month left to complete my 2D game for college and although i thought by this stage i would have settled down and gotten into a coding routine. I thought id  be at that sweet spot in a project where your really deep in your work, enjoying it and nothing else really matters, but instead i'm just constantly putting the next workload off.    I never really had this problem so bad in previous years with general software development, it could be that i have just gotten more lazy but my theory is that by playing and enjoying the latest games (my favs: hotline Miami, far cry 3, hitman absolution, chivalry: medieval warfare) I am being constantly exposed to cutting edge, top-notch game development and design, so when i return to my primal, sorry excuse for a game (which is to be expected for a 1st attempt) my drive and enthusiasm suffers immensely! Instead of using these games for inspiration, I am just being constantly reminded of how many ideas I wont be able to implement because of my level of skill.   anyone else have similar problems?
  6. https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B15GggekvGgoNnlET0RwUktaMnc   Here is my 20,000 word research phase report for my final year project in college.   Before starting on this i trawled through the internet for something similar which would help me, a template to work off of, but couldn't find anything that wasn't really specific/technical, had an objective view and was professionally/academically written. Seems to be much harder to find this sort of stuff in relation to games as apposed to traditional software.   So i hope this may help someone who is also being forced to write this crap when they should be getting down and dirty with code ;)   PS: Google Docs screws up the formatting so click file -> download and open in word to view properly.
  7. after some more research it looks like using sound fonts is the way to go! for example here: http://woolyss.com/chipmusic-soundfonts.php#soundfonts
  8. Ok, so you have provided me with a bit of clarity in terms of what i am looking for. I guess the software in which i assemble the music only matters so much as to how simple and intuitive it is to use, i was just saying that impulse tracker looks dated and unintuative compared with modern composing software. I suppose i could use ableton as long as i have the right sounding instruments. The more important issue is trying to find sounds, samples and instruments which sound like the videos a posted above. I believe the sound is characterized by a sort of cheesiness in the sound of the synths which try to sound like peices of an orchestra, sometimes mixed with some more electronic sounds. Think old zelda games? i want this cheesiness because i think its gives the music more charm. Maybe some of these software packages like impulse tracker have decent default libraries to work with, i dont mind, i would be happy to work with a limited set of sounds as long as i can do it on the cheap! Are there not a selection of sounds that are simply freeware at this stage due to how common they are in those types of games, like theres only so many variations of a cheesy string instrument you will hear in the music for these games! I am trying my best to convey what i want, but i am somewhat limited by my musical knowledge, i am good at putting sounds and instruments together but when it comes to the technical details of those sounds i genuinely dont have a clue!
  9. I have ableton but i do believe there is commonly used software to create authentic retro style music like impulse tracker. My goal is to make music that sounds like these, not as far back as 8-bit chip tune, but just that nice middle area like the sonic era: metal slug theme: [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xdv3fKqbYk"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xdv3fKqbYk[/url] a project similar to mine: [url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6WTnpxdrQE"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6WTnpxdrQE[/url] I am under alot of pressure for time so dont want to spend a lot of time learning how to use software to make something like this, is there any more user friendly alternate to something like impulse tracker? Is it relatively easy to make a simple 16-bit sounding (?!) track in impulse tracker? perhaps there is a nice downloadable synth for ableton i could use? also note i must make the theme for commercial use so i need mostly royalty free samples/instruments! Thanks in advance, Hugh.
  10. thanks beernutts, il look into that. any other opinions? the more the merrier!
  11. Hi, I would like to get some opinions on whether i should develop my game using a physics engine (farseer physics seems to be the best option) or follow the traditional tile-based method. Quick background: - its a college project, my first game, but have 4 years academic programming experience - Just want a basic platformer with a few levels, nothing fancy - want a shooting mechanic, run and gun, just like contra or metal slug for example - possibly some simple puzzles I have made a basic prototype with farseer, the level is hardcoded with collisions and not really tiled, more like big full-screen sized tiles, with collision bodies drawn manually along the ground and walls etc. My main problem is i want a simple retro feel to the jumping and physics but because its a physics simulation engine its going to be realistic, whereas typical in air controllable physics for platformers arent realistic. I have to make a box with wheel body fixture under it to have this effect and its glitchy and doesnt feel right. I chose to use a physics engine because i tried the tile method initially and found it very hard to understand, the engine took care of alot things to save me time, mainly being able to do slopes easily was nice and the freedom to draw collision bounds wherever i liked, rather then restricted to a grid, which gave me more freedom for art design also. In conclusion i don't know which method to pick, i want to use a method which will be the most straight forward way to implement and wont give me a headache later on, preferably a method which has an abundance of tutorials and resources so i dont get "stuck" doing something which has been done a million times before! Let me know i haven't provided enough information for you to help me! Thanks in advance, Hugh.