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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

mikeishere

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  1.     This is a common them in government, trying to save the citizens/subjects from their own stupidity for their own good. However, regulations are always a bad idea. Free market consumer interaction will always be more efficient and lead to more wealth because it allows greed, the motivation of just about everything great in this world, to do its thing. What do you think would happen if all the regulations were abolished tomorrow. Would we have an epidemic of poorly run and dangerous businesses a few years from now? Of course not, because consumers don't run charities. They want the best value for their money, always. Usually they will want people with experience and a good reputation because their is a smaller risk involved. They also might want to go for the cheapest guy despite him not having a track record (risky). Regardless, they should be able to choose. Government regulations aren't necessary to pick and choose suitable businesses and unsuitable businesses. The consumers can do it much better and without paying paper pushing bureaucrats. Crappy businesses fail and good businesses prosper.            The sad thing is that "protecting the people" isn't even the whole story as people have said above. Reducing competition is a huge factor not only in Detroit but also on a nationwide scale as anyone familiar with the dealings of large corporations and the government will tell you. Disgusting if you ask me       Maybe this example seems too extreme for you; maybe when you said "regulations are always a bad idea," you didn't really mean always, just sometimes. In that case, here's a slightly more down-to-earth example:   Imagine, again, that you are a producer of food. You could increase your profits if you could make your food cheaper to produce. You discover that by using extremely dangerous pesticides or other chemicals, you get to sell a higher percentage of your crop than your competitors. Your food might be less safe, but you don't know this for sure, and the pesticides might be damaging the water supply, but this does not bother you: government inspectors never come to examine your means of production, and you simply do not reveal what you're doing. In fact, you can just lie, and say that you're not using chemicals at all.   Your competitors could hope that people somehow catch onto what you're doing, but they don't, at least not quickly enough. Your competitors realize that, by the time any detrimental health effects of your food become public knowledge, they will no longer be in business, since your prices are so much lower. To save their business, your competitors realize that they have to start using chemicals, too. Eventually, citizens might discover that the chemicals in their food has devastating long-term effects, but by this time you have made enough money that you have left the food-production business altogether. You live in your mansion while everyone who eats the food you sold them dies of cancer. The simple fact is that, even the most hardcore, free-market theorists know that regulations are necessary; no one who studies the economy disputes this. There's disagreement as to how much or which regulation is necessary, but any attempt to model an economy that has scarce resources and actors motivated by greed reveals that a completely unregulated market is bad for almost everyone.     I should clarify. When I said "regulations are always a bad idea" I meant government mandated regulations are always a bad idea. As you can see I'm hinting at the fact that quality control is important for consumers, but there is no reason it needs to or should come from the government. Anything provided by the government can be done better by the private market. Food certification boards provided by the free market could impose certain regulations on food producers in order to put a little stamp on their product that consumers trust. Furthermore, because of competition between certification boards and food producers the quality and safety of food would surely increase. Don't you think YOU should be able to choose which products are suitable or not? Or are you the kind of person that believes in the infinite wisdom of elected saviors that will guide us to the promised land? There is nothing special about government apart from the fact that it cannot fail no matter the results it produces. 
  2.     This is a common them in government, trying to save the citizens/subjects from their own stupidity for their own good. However, regulations are always a bad idea. Free market consumer interaction will always be more efficient and lead to more wealth because it allows greed, the motivation of just about everything great in this world, to do its thing. What do you think would happen if all the regulations were abolished tomorrow. Would we have an epidemic of poorly run and dangerous businesses a few years from now? Of course not, because consumers don't run charities. They want the best value for their money, always. Usually they will want people with experience and a good reputation because their is a smaller risk involved. They also might want to go for the cheapest guy despite him not having a track record (risky). Regardless, they should be able to choose. Government regulations aren't necessary to pick and choose suitable businesses and unsuitable businesses. The consumers can do it much better and without paying paper pushing bureaucrats. Crappy businesses fail and good businesses prosper.            The sad thing is that "protecting the people" isn't even the whole story as people have said above. Reducing competition is a huge factor not only in Detroit but also on a nationwide scale as anyone familiar with the dealings of large corporations and the government will tell you. Disgusting if you ask me
  3. stay away from the caffeine as it will just make you crash eventually and feel like utter garbage   I would recommend standing up every now and then for circulation in your lower half   For snacks I recommend goldfish as they are my favorite :)   Other than that good luck and have fun
  4. wrong section mate and please go lol
  5. I recommend sager if you like to game.
  6. I also love listenign to video game music when i program but not always morrowind/halo2 soundtracks are my favorites otherwise i listen to nothing or some white noise if other people are around
  7. [quote name="LennyLen" post="5013555" timestamp="1356229729"][quote]but as far as I'm concerned he decided, probably with more than a little push from his wife, to separate himself from a situation that put his family and business in jeopardy.[/quote] It in no way put the business in jeopardy. She had been employed for 10 years and he even stated that she was the best dental assistant he had ever had. It may have been putting his marriage in jeopardy, but that is irreverent in the employer/employee relationship. She was hired to do a job and she did the job well. Firing her is unfair dismissal.[/quote]
  8. OP I am in a very similar situation. I made a thread on it in the "Breaking in into the Industry" section called "mixed feelings at uni". I've decided to just stick it out in uni, get my degree (currently freshman) and just program A LOT in my spare time (which is quite plentiful as an undergrad).
  9. Hello folks I need some advice I'm currently a freshman (18 y.o.) at a large Big 10 uni with a very good computer science program. I did not start programming until this past summer, but I really really like it. I'd say my c++ skills right now are halfway between absolute beginner and intermediate (havent been able to dedicate a huge amount of time to it cuz of uni), so I still have a long way to go. Anyways, the problem for me is I feel like uni is not going to help me at all in becoming a game developer. I feel like I can teach myself better/faster than most courses I will take here. Moreover, I can learn what I want when I want. If I wasn't sure what I wanted to do for a career other than that it would be computer science related, I would not have a problem staying in uni. The thing is I really like programming but only in the context of being a game developer in the future. I don't want to want a programming career in anything else. Period. Here is a list of pros and cons for I have come up with for dropping out of uni (I'm definitely going to school next semester so I have some time to think this over) Pros - Much more time to dedicate to game programming - Save close to $100,000 (parents' money) that I would spend on next 3 years of tuition - Don't have to worry about keeping up my grades in classes where I have only lukewarm interest Cons- - Will be missing out on a lot of the social benefits on Uni I don't "party" but I do enjoy the company of others my age with similar interests which would be hard to find if I dropped out of school. Additionally, there is much more access to attractive women my age here than if I wasn't going to school. - No "insurance" (i.e. a degree) if game programming doesn't work out for me. - Parents/family members will be disappointed (not really a big deal though) - I could still work on game dev. in my spare time (one has quite a bit as an undergrad) but note that is hard to focus on such when you have your actual classes constantly on your mind. At least that's the way it is for me. I've been incredibly stressed over this for the past few weeks and am quite lost on what to do. Hopefully some of you can give me useful insight on how to move forward. Thanks in advance |||| Side-Note |||| - You may find this relevant. Humility aside, I am a rather intelligent person with an IQ of 140 (not on the super genius level of Bill Gates, Zuckerberg etc but it would be the next tier). I am able to digest and apply new concepts rather quickly (which is why I generally prefer teaching myself over a uni course). |||| Side-Note |||| Edit: Forgot to add- The computer science degree at my uni is almost entirely in Java